Religious Engineering: What Alien Abduction Has to Do with the CIA, the Finders, & Child Abuse

strieber2

“There is the possibility, as I have discussed, that conscious life extends into an energetic level that is completely detached from the physical.”
—Whitley Strieber, Solving the Communion Enigma


In the third chapter of Solving the Communion Enigma, the author, Whitley Strieber discusses a shadowy organization called “the Finders.” This organizations activities first came to light when reported by the Washington Post in February 1987. Two white males were arrested in Tallahassee Park, with six disheveled children, all under the age of seven.  From the Customs report from February 12, 1987:

The children were covered with insect bites, were very dirty, most of the children were not wearing underpants and all of the children had not been bathed in many days. . . . The men were somewhat evasive in their answers to police and stated only that they were the children’s teachers and that all were en route to Mexico to establish a school for brilliant children. The children were unaware of the functions of telephones, television and toilets, and stated that they were not allowed to live indoors and were only given food as a reward. . . . Cursory examination of documents revealed detailed instructions for obtaining children for unspecified purposes. The instructions included the impregnation of female members of the community, purchasing children, trading and kidnapping. . . . There were pictures of nude children and adult Finders, as well as evidence of high-tech money transfers. There was a file called ‘Pentagon Break-in,’ and references to activities in Moscow, Hong Kong, China, Malaysia, North Vietnam, North Korea, Africa, London, Germany, ‘Europe’ and the Bahamas. . . . One such telex specifically ordered the purchase of two children in Hong Kong to be arranged through a contact in the Chinese Embassy there. Other documents identified interests in high-tech transfers to the United Kingdom, numerous properties under the control of the Finders, a keen interest in terrorism, explosives, and the evasion of law enforcement. 

A warehouse purportedly in use by the organization was discovered and evidence of their activities found. The Finders were described in a court document as a cult that conducted “brainwashing” and used children “in rituals.” Photographs allegedly showed naked children involved in bloodletting ceremonies of animals and sexual orgies, including a photograph of a child in chains. Evidence was found for an international network of child trafficking for sexual and other purposes. The investigation was abruptly ended, however, when the US Justice Department named it a matter of “national security.” It was turned over to the CIA as an “internal security matter.” The evidence was suppressed (there’s no Wikipedia page for the case), and the children were released back to the same adults who had been arrested for abusing them.

finders-doc

Why, in a book about alien contact, does Strieber have a chapter about this group? The answer is that he has ample reason to suspect that he was also inducted, as a child, into whatever murky operation being carried out under the cloak of national security. Strieber remembers being taken to a school for “brilliant children” in Monterrey, Mexico, though he is left with “very little recollection of what happened there.”

There is one flash of memory of seeing another child holding a bloody saw. I was told that this child had killed somebody with it. The child appeared absolutely terrified. While this person, whom I still know well, seems to have no memory of this incident, she has lived a ruined, disturbed life. She has never been healthy, either physically or mentally. My wife tells me that I have mentioned seeing Jewish babies there, and that I once said that the school was located in a villa owned by somebody connected with the Pan American Sulphur Company. I have no recollection of saying either of these things. The Pan American Sulphur Company did indeed exist, and was once a powerful influence in Mexico.

Strieber first wrote about this period of his life (growing up in San Antonio, Texas, in the 1940s and 1950s) in 1997, in The Secret School. The book recounts a “hidden life” in which Strieber and other children belonged to a secret school run by “the visitors” (curiously, he remembers them mostly as nuns, called “Sisters of Mercy”). It was six years later, at his website in 2003, that he first shared memories of a secret government program that involved systemized traumatization of children, for ends never fully explained.

Jasun Horsley

Jasun Horsley

Existential detective. Liminalist author. Movie autist in chronic confessional mode. You only think you don't know who I am.
Jasun Horsley
  • http://www.abovetopsecret.com The Skeptic Overlord

    first