Author Archive | Good German

US Officials Leak Information About the ISIS Raid That’s More Sensitive than Anything Snowden Ever Leaked

AK Rockefeller (CC BY-SA 2.0)

AK Rockefeller (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Trevor Timm writes at the Freedom of the Press Foundation:

Over the weekend, the US government announced that special forces soldiers entered Syria to conduct a raid that killed an alleged leader of ISIS, Abu Sayyaf. In the process, anonymous US officials leaked classified information to the New York Times that’s much more sensitive than anything Edward Snowden ever revealed, and it serves as a prime example of the government’s hypocrisy when it comes to disclosures of secret information.

Here’s how the New York Times described how the US conducted this “successful” raid:

The raid came after weeks of surveillance of Abu Sayyaf, using information gleaned from a small but growing network of informants the C.I.A. and the Pentagon have painstakingly developed in Syria, as well as satellite imagery, drone reconnaissance and electronic eavesdropping, American officials said. The White House rejected initial reports from the region that attributed the raid to the forces of President Bashar al-Assad of Syria.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

Thirteen Things I Learned in Iran

A hilltop view of Tehran, the capital of Iran. (Photo: ninara/flickr/cc)

A hilltop view of Tehran, the capital of Iran. (Photo: ninara/flickr/cc)

Robert Naiman writes at Common Dreams:

I just experienced the blessing of visiting Iran for the first time. Here are some things I learned.

1. If you are visiting someone’s office and you appear very sleepy, you may be asked if you want to take a nap. If you say yes, a comfortable place to take a nap may be immediately prepared. I want to state categorically for the record that no country in which you can take a nap any time you want should ever be bombed by anyone.

2. Any American who wants a hero’s welcome in Iran right now should compare the Saudi bombing and blockade of Yemen to the Israeli bombing and blockade of Gaza. An American sporting a “Saudi Arabia = Israel” button could get invited to any party in Iran right now.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

The TPP, the Biomassacre and the End Game for the Great Forests of the Northwest

Michael Donnelly writes at CounterPunch:

The Charge and Retreat of the Faux-Resistance

New York’s Third Senator Ron Wyden, (D-Ecocide) had a banner week. First, the media and social memes were ubiquitous on the hours-long Faux Resistance mounted against the secret Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) trade deal pushed by Obama. Wyden’s joining other Dems in the faux resistance got big media play and allowed die-hard Dem boosters to ignore (for a few hours, anyway) his long-standing role as TPP’s main sponsor of the (fait accompli) Senate legislation – at the behest of the usual oligarchs.

Other “liberal” Dems, Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid, Ben Cardin of Maryland, Dianne Feinstein of California, and Christopher Coons of Delaware, Sen. Tim Kaine of Virginia and others also took cover and voted with the faux resistance on Tuesday’s meaningless procedural vote. Predictably, the resistance quickly collapsed after the press releases went out and a dealwas cut by Wyden et al.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

The Rise of the Child Terrorist

DGriebeling (CC BY 2.0)

DGriebeling (CC BY 2.0)

Mia Bloom and John Horgan write at Foreign Affairs:

On January 15, a video surfaced on the Internet that depicted a 10-year-old Kazakh boy using a gun to execute two Russian members of the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS) who had been accused of being spies. ISIS claimed ownership of the video, although it has not yet been authenticated. Only a few days earlier, twin suicide bombings rocked northern Nigeria, involving three girls, who appeared to have been only 10 years old, all wearing explosives that may have been remotely detonated by members of Boko Haram. A year before, a nine-year-old girl named Spozhmai, who is the sibling of an Afghan Taliban commander, was detained at a border checkpoint in Kandahar. Rather than go through with her mission, she confessed to the authorities that she had been forced to wear a suicide belt.

The exploitation of children by terrorist groups is not new, but groups such as ISIS, Boko Haram, and the Pakistani Taliban are increasingly using children to carry out their activities.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

Why You Should Hide Your Virginity

Hartwig HKD (CC BY-ND 2.0)

Hartwig HKD (CC BY-ND 2.0)

Via the Black Pill:

For all of you virgin men out there like me you should never let anyone know that you are a virgin.  Lie about it.  Do whatever it takes although there are many cases where less is more since most people aren’t thinking about your sex life.  Here’s an example of why you should never let anyone know you’re a virgin in real life.

A HOSPITAL worker was so upset after being branded a 35-year-old virgin that he left his job claiming sex discrimination.

Frenchman Christophe Lepeltier said his life was made a misery by a whispering campaign at Lothian Health Board.

The cleaner, who worked at Edinburgh’s Eye Pavilion, was the butt of jokes about his sexuality, his nationality and claims that he had HIV.

He moved to another hospital – but found that the bizarre rumours had got there ahead of him.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

Long Beach Police Officer ID’d in Fatal Shooting of Unarmed 19-Year-Old

Hector Morejon is shown in a family photo with his mother, Lucia Morejon.

Hector Morejon is shown in a family photo with his mother, Lucia Morejon.

Matt Hamilton writes at the LA Times:

A veteran of the Long Beach Police Department was identified Tuesday as the officer who fatally shot an unarmed 19-year-old last month while responding to a reported vandalism, authorities said.

The Long Beach Police Department said Jeffrey A. Meyer, a patrol officer with the department since 1990, opened fire at Hector Morejon in the afternoon of April 23. The department released the information in response to a public records request filed by The Times.

Meyer, who has been removed from field duties, was involved in a police shooting in March 2002, according to a Police Department spokeswoman. The circumstances of the 2002 shooting were not immediately available.

The president of the Long Beach Police Officers Assn., Steve James, opposed the decision by The Times to publish the name of the police officer involved in the shooting.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

A Coversation With Genesis Breyer P-Orridge

Michael Nirenberg interviewing Genesis Breyer P-Orridge, at the Huffington Post:

GBO: I turned 65 in February. My eldest daughter Caresse is going to be 33 in august. You are old enough to be my child. (laughs). Isn’t that weird?

MN: It is weird. You someone I wanted to be like when I was in my 20’s. I thought, “Here’s somebody who was himself.”

GBO: Well thank you. That’s what I used to think about Burroughs and Gysin. I want to be a bohemian, poet, artist, freak, (laughs) and managed to. I got very fortunate to be meeting and working with them as well.

MN: It’s great to be at a place where you can meet the people you admired and hope you can do the same for the next generation.

GBPO: God, I hope so.

MN: I’m working my ass off towards it.

GBPO: That’s good to know, it’s arid out there at the moment.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

Before You Call a Man a Creep—or Worse—Read This

See-ming Lee (CC BY 2.0)

See-ming Lee (CC BY 2.0)

Peter Ross writes at the Good Men Project:

We’ve all seen the stories online about men being falsely accused of being creeps and paedophiles. Stop me if any of these sound familiar:

I was sitting on a bench watching my granddaughter on the swings when the police show up to question me because someone reported that I was leering at the children.

I was asked to move seats on a plane because a child was seated next to me.

I was tapped on the shoulder by police while I was taking photos of the beach. Someone thought I was taking pictures of their children.

For most men, any of the above situations would not only be mortifying but would also make us extremely angry to be accused of such a heinous intention just because we have a Y chromosome. This is an awful phenomenon and one that has been written about a number of times, and recently on The Good Men Project, in an attempt to educate people that, surprise, most men aren’t predators.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

Amnesty International: Whitewashing Another Massacre

Richard Potts (CC BY 2.0)

Richard Potts (CC BY 2.0)

Paul de Rooij writes at CounterPunch:

Amnesty International has issued four reports on the Massacre in Gaza in 2014 [1]. Given the scale of the destruction and the number of fatalities, any attempt to document the crimes committed should be welcomed. But these reports are problematic, and raise questions about this organization [2], including why they were written at all. It also raises questions about the broader human rights industry that are worth considering.

Basic Background

July 2014 marked the onset of the Israeli massacre in Gaza (I will dispense with the Israeli sugar-coated operation names). The Israeli army trained for this attack for several months before finding a pretext to attack Gaza, shattering an existing ceasefire; this was the third such post-“disengagement” (2004) attack, and possibly the worst so far. At least 2,215 were killed and 10,000+ wounded, most of them civilians. The scale of destruction was staggering: tens of thousands of houses rendered uninhabitable; several high-rise buildings struck by huge American-supplied bombs; schools and hospitals targeted; 61 mosques totally destroyed; water purification and sewage treatment plants damaged; Gaza’s main flour mill bombed; all chicken farms ravaged; an incalculable devastation [3].

Read the rest
Continue Reading

Mind Your Own Business

Surian Soosay (CC BY 2.0)

Surian Soosay (CC BY 2.0)

Barbara Ehrenreich writes at the Baffler:

At about the beginning of this decade, mass-market mindfulness rolled out of the Bay Area like a brand new app. Very much like an app, in fact, or a whole swarm of apps. Previous self-improvement trends had been transmitted via books, inspirational speakers, and CDs; now, mindfulness could be carried around on a smartphone. There are hundreds of them, these mindfulness apps, bearing names like Smiling Mind and Buddhify. A typical example features timed stretches of meditation, as brief as one minute, accompanied by soothing voices, soporific music, and images of forests and waterfalls.

This is Buddhism sliced up and commodified, and, in case the connection to the tech industry is unclear, a Silicon Valley venture capitalist blurbed a seminal mindfulness manual by calling it “the instruction manual that should come with our iPhones and BlackBerries.” It’s enough to make you think that the actual Buddha devoted all his time under the Bodhi Tree to product testing.

Read the rest
Continue Reading