Author Archive | Good German

Astounded by the Lack of Compassion for Men in Prison: Inside the Conversation at The Good Men Project

jmiller291 (CC BY 2.0)

jmiller291 (CC BY 2.0)

Via the Good Men Project:

Lisa Hickey: I’ve been thinking a lot about prison lately. It’s not something that, as a women, I am used to thinking about a lot, and the number of conversations I’ve had about the topic in my lifetime are far and few between. Perhaps men don’t think or talk about it much either, but we’ve been discussing it a lot on the The Good Men Project lately and I’d like to share with you the complexity of the issues and the insights I’ve seen unfolding.

One thing we’ve discussed recently in an article is the difference in sentencing between men and women for similar crimes. I think the sentencing disparity is part of a cultural narrative that goes like this: Men are assumed to be guilty more often, and they are also assumed to cause more harm when they do commit crimes.

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This Is Absolutely Terrifying: “There Are Really Only Two Big Patches of Intact Forest Left on Earth”

Alias 0591 (CC BY-NC 2.0)

Alias 0591 (CC BY-NC 2.0)

Lindsay Abrams writes at Salon:

Can a forest that exists only in the spaces between roads and patches cleared for human settlement and agricultural development truly be called a forest?

Not so much, say researchers studying the growing, global problem of forest fragmentation. And the “persistent, deleterious and often unpredicted” consequences of human activity, finds a new study conducted by a team off 24 international scientists, and funded by the National Science Foundation, may be ruinous for plant and animal life.

“There are really only two big patches of intact forest left on Earth — the Amazon and the Congo — and they shine out like eyes from the center of the map,” lead author Nick Haddad, a professor at North Carolina State University, told the New Yorker.

“Nearly 20 percent of the world’s remaining forests are the distance of a football field — or about 100 meters — away from forest edges,” he elaborated in a statement.

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How to Discipline Your Children without Rewards or Punishment

Discipline is necessary for children, but we need to teach them to self-discipline, not bribe them to be good. Emiliano, CC BY-SA

Discipline is necessary for children, but we need to teach them to self-discipline, not bribe them to be good. Emiliano, CC BY-SA

Might parenting be one of the reasons so many people grow up to be obedient worker/consumer/sheeple?  Rebecca English writes at the Conversation.

Rebecca English, Queensland University of Technology

Many parents are moving towards “gentle parenting”, where they choose not to use rewards (sticker charts, lollies, chocolates, TV time as “bribes”) and punishments (taking away “privileges”, time-out, smacking) to encourage good behaviour, but encourage good behaviour for the sake of doing the right thing.

Gentle parents argue that to offer rewards and punishments overrides a child’s natural inclination towards appropriate behaviour by teaching them to behave in certain ways purely to receive a reward, or to avoid punishment.

What is discipline?

For most people it would seem impossible to discipline without rewards and punishments. However, it depends on your understanding of “discipline”.

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‘The Best Movie of All Times?': Jim Henson’s “Dark Crystal” as Warning Against the NWO and WWIII

Screen Shot 2015-03-29 at 8.17.23 PM

Via the YouTube Description:

PREVENTING WORLD WAR 3 IS NOT AN EASY TASK
This series of clips is aimed at giving an interpretation of the message left to us by the makers of “The Dark Crystal.” The original movie is available in internet and rental stores. This is an artistic effort (not popularity contest) and, therefore, there will be those who appreciate the effort and those who don’t. “To each his own.”

The uploader has disabled embedding of the videos, so please click here to watch them.

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For I Was Hungry and You Gave Me Food, I Was Thirsty and You Gave Me Drink, I Was Homeless and WTF You Drenched Me With Sprinklers To Drive Me Away

newjesusfoodstamps

Abby Zimet writes at Common Dreams:

Evidently setting aside their stated goal of “advancing human dignity” to ponder the abstruse question, “Who would Jesus soak?” San Francisco’s stately Saint Mary’s Cathedral, home to the Archdiocese and Archbishop, has been dousing homeless people who sleep in its doorways with a sprinkler system as “a safety, security and cleanliness measure” to “encourage them to relocate to other areas” – with, obviously, God’s blessing. They stopped the practice this week after critics ripped the practice as “inhumane,” city officials said it’s illegal, and church officials conceded “it actually has had the opposite effect from what it was intended to do (maybe kinda like opposing birth control and other so-called right-to-life stances?) and for this we are very sorry.”

Saint Mary’s has long attracted homeless campers in the alcoves of its four soaring doorways, despite clear signs posted on the church – umm, what?

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God is Evil, Man is Free

Portrait_of_Pierre_Joseph_Proudhon_1865By Pierre-Joseph Proudhon, via the Anarchist Library:

My friends beg me, in the interest of our common ideas, and to remove any pretext for slander, to make my opinion known on the divinity and Providence, and at the same time to explain certain passages from the System of [Economic] Contradictions, that the reactionary tartuffes have for a year constantly exploited against socialism with simple and credulous souls.

I surrender to their solicitations. I will even say that if I have for so long let the Constitutionnel and its consorts make of me a Vanini even more ferocious that the original, attacking at once God and the Devil, — the family and property, — I had my reasons for that. First I wanted to lead certain schools, up to then considered enemies, to confess themselves their perfect resemblance; I wanted, in a word, it to be demonstrated to the eyes of all that doctrinaire and Jesuit, it is all one.

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Magnets Can Influence Heat and Sound

Researchers at The Ohio State University have discovered how to control heat with a magnetic field. An experiment proved that the phonon--the elementary particle that carries heat and sound--has magnetic properties. This artist's rendering, based on computer simulations, depicts a phonon heating solid material. Atoms of the material, shown in orange, are joined with flexible atomic bonds, shown as springs. The phonon imparts heat by colliding with the center atom, creating a vibration in the springs. The trail of the passing phonon is marked with increased magnetic field intensity, shown in green. The figure in the lower right shows the direction of the applied magnetic field. The researchers found that a sufficiently strong magnetic field can cause phonons to collide with each other and be deflected off-course, which slows the flow of heat through the material. Credit: Image by Renee Ripley, courtesy of The Ohio State University.

Researchers at The Ohio State University have discovered how to control heat with a magnetic field. 
Credit: Image by Renee Ripley, courtesy of The Ohio State University.

I think my stereo’s speakers proved that last one, but anyway, via ScienceDaily:

Researchers at The Ohio State University have discovered how to control heat with a magnetic field.

In the March 23 issue of the journal Nature Materials, they describe how a magnetic field roughly the size of a medical MRI reduced the amount of heat flowing through a semiconductor by 12 percent.

The study is the first ever to prove that acoustic phonons — the elemental particles that transmit both heat and sound — have magnetic properties.

“This adds a new dimension to our understanding of acoustic waves,” said Joseph Heremans, Ohio Eminent Scholar in Nanotechnology and professor of mechanical engineering at Ohio State. “We’ve shown that we can steer heat magnetically.

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The One-Man Revolution (the Only One That’s Coming)

katieb50 (CC BY 2.0)

katieb50 (CC BY 2.0)

David Gross writes at the MOON:

YOU SEE the beauty of my proposal is
it needn’t wait on general revolution.
I bid you to the one-man revolution —
The only revolution that is coming.

Robert Frost
from Build Soil

TODAY, instead of dredging up something from the archives about historical tax resistance campaigns and movements, I want to spend some time looking at individual tax resistance in service of what Ammon Hennacy called the “one-man*revolution.”

Whether Hennacy got the name from Frost’s poem, or Frost from him, or whether each came up with it independently, I don’t know. The idea goes back much further than either, and in particular is especially pronounced in Thoreau’s thinking.

This idea is that, contrary to what the organizers of the world are always telling us, the key to curing society’s ills is not necessarily to organize at all. You don’t need a majority, or a critical mass, or a disciplined revolutionary vanguard.

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Individualism vs. Personality

Daniel Spaulding writes at Soul of the East:

In a West that declines as surely as the course of the sun, opponents of the incipient World State often define the modern situation as a dialectical struggle between collectivism on one side and individualism on the other. Usually “collectivism” is meant to define any manifestation of state power, be it fascism, communism, the liberal managerial state, or globalist technocracy, though many would expand the classification to include traditional religious institutions and even the family.

What is less clearly defined is “individualism,” a slippery term that means different things to different people. Popular opinion holds that “individualism” is the ability to choose and follow one’s desires for self-expression, be it spending one’s money how one prefers or something more trivial such as dying one’s hair blue.

When viewed from the perspective of a dialectical clash with collectivism, especially the state, the notion of individuality does take on a weightier significance than its more trivial manifestations, i.e.

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Truth is Our Country

Paul Craig Roberts’ acceptance speech for the International Award for Excellence in Journalism (via CounterPunch):

Thank you for this recognition, for this honor.  As Jesus told the people of Nazareth, a prophet is without honor in his own country.  In the United States, this is also true of journalists.

In the United States journalists receive awards for lying for the government and for the corporations.  Anyone who tells the truth, whether journalist or whistleblower, is fired or prosecuted or has to hide out in the Ecuadoran Embassy in London, like Julian Assange, or in Moscow, like Edward Snowden, or is tortured and imprisoned, like Bradley Manning.

Mexican journalists pay an even higher price. Those who report on government corruption and on the drug cartels pay with their lives.

The Internet encyclopedia, Wikipedia, has as an entry a list by name of journalists murdered in Mexico. This is the List of Honor.

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