Articles by JacobSloan

Can you afford NOT to give your child the advantage of a nanny who will cultivate their sixth sense? The Mirror on a so-called “psychic nanny”:

Single mother Denise Lescano, from Florida, US, is a much needed support for parents of children who show worrying signs of having a sixth sense. Denise uses her psychic abilities to ‘speak to’ the spirits and instructs families on how to approach life beyond death.

Denise, who believes she has been psychic since the age of nine, said: “My biggest mission in life is to get rid of the fear around what I do. This is not a scary thing, this is a very healing and comforting thing.”

Often Denise is called to determine whether youngsters are seeing spirits or displaying signs of mental illness: “Sometimes the parents don’t know how do deal with their children’s abilities.”

Buzzfeed‘s Matt Stopera visited the Creation Museum in Kentucky and takes note of the various attractions and lessons learned. The centerpiece is a Universal Studios-style multimedia movie experience (“Just think how it could change her life if Wendy found out there really is purpose and meaning to her existence!”) designed to cement kids’ scorn and skepticism of evolution-spouting teachers, with a simple but effective message – caring about science is for nerds:

They had this special effects show in a big theater with shaking chairs and water sprinklers. It was pretty cool and very Disney. This part caught my attention, though. They were constantly tearing down teachers. Teachers who teach evolution are the worst!

salvation mountainThe Los Angeles Times reports the death of an eccentric visionary who assembled his own psychedelic-religious portal to another dimension out in the desert of California:

Leonard Knight, the lean New Englander who spent three decades joyously painting religious messages on a tall mound of adobe he called Salvation Mountain in the Imperial Valley desert, died Monday at age 82.

His death was announced on his Salvation Mountain Facebook page by his devoted followers who have been attempting to preserve his labor of love east of the Salton Sea near the squatter village called Slab City.

Until his health declined, Knight had lived in the back of his truck, sharing his space with a variety of cats without names, undeterred by the brutal desert heat or howling winds. To his amazement, Knight had become a favorite of folk art aficionados.