Author Archive | JoeNolan

Nimoy’s Kabbalistic Photography

Photo by Leonard Nimoy

Photo by Leonard Nimoy

It was sad to lose Leonard Nimoy, but it’s wonderful to look back on the man’s productive creative life and feel gratitude for his gifts. An interesting point of focus in many of the remembrances I’ve seen is Nimoy’s work as a photographer. Some of Nimoy’s photographs connect directly to his spiritual life, but so does the character of Spock. Nimoy’s photos aren’t as well known as his acting, but the fact is that whether he was on a television screen, in front of a movie camera or working behind the lens to create his own still images, Nimoy was a mystic who grounded his creativity in the sky. Here’s what art critic and poet Donald Kuspit had to say about Nimoy’s and his art…

Nimoy is a gnostic mystic—a radical spiritualist, indeed, a spiritual rebel…I am suggesting that Nimoy’s fascination with the female body involves an element of temptation as well as transcendence.Read the rest

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Jodorowsky Gets Kickstarter Green-Light

Jodo Young

Over the weekend, Alejandro Jodorowsky’s recent Kickstarter campaign made its goal of $300,000 and was closing in on $385,000 with three days to go at the time of this posting. It looks to me like it might end up just beyond the $400,000 mark.

My girlfriend and I supported the campaign to make Endless Poetry a reality, and I’ve been posting to the film’s poetry archive via Twitter. I don’t write poetry as often as I do critical writing, songwriting, blogging etc. I usually feel moved to actually practice poetry with more attention in the fall, but this year that didn’t really happen.

I’m really happy that this Jodorowsky archive has popped up as its given me a framework and a set of rules for writing poems and I’ve found it to be completely engaging. People think writer’s block denotes a lack of ideas, but, in fact it’s usually an abundance of ideas that stops the process, and it’s often limits and lacking that finally stoke the fires again.… Read the rest

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Black Moon/Dave Cloud

Dave Cloud

Last Wednesday afternoon my Facebook wall began to light-up with the frantic news that outsider musician and Nashvillian par-excellence, Dave Cloud, was in an intensive care unit as a result of his battle with cancer. The news came out of nowhere for most of the rocker’s friends and admirers, and last Thursday’s announcement of his death came so quickly that most are still trying to wrap their heads — and hearts — around the wide, wild space Cloud and his art once occupied.

For the uninitiated, here’s a bit of the man’s bio:

By day a volunteer book reader for the blind, Cloud undergoes a transformation at night, and for over three decades has entertained patrons of local dive bar Springwater, often with his band The Gospel of Power. Cloud’s unpredictable performances can be uproarious, jaw-droppingly bizarre events, delighting some while frightening others. His musical amalgam of experimental garage rock and lounge crooning—defies easy categorization, but his delivery makes the experience hard to forget.

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Alejandro Jodorowsky’s Endless Poetry

Dinero Poetico

Alejandro Jodorowsky is one of my favorite filmmakers, but that won’t come as a surprise to anyone who follows my posts. I’ve seen all of the master’s films and was particularly excited by last year’s release of both The Dance of Reality and the documentary Jodorowsky’s Dune. The former was Jodo’s most recent feature film and the elegiac tone of the movie felt a bit like a summing up of a life and a career, and a few friends of mine even opined that they thought it would be the great magician’s last illusion.

Not so.

Taking a page from the younger set, Jodo has a new Kickstarter campaign underway to fund his next cinematic project. Here’s the skinny…

After a 23 yearlong absence, the director of cult classics El Topo (1969) and Holy Mountain (1973) made his comeback in film direction in 2013 with The Dance of Reality. The film was based on the first part of Alejandro Jodorowsky’s homonymous autobiographical book, depicting his childhood years in Tocopilla, Chile.Read the rest

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Celebrating Alice

Alice Cooper

This week we celebrate the birthday of Vincent Furnier who was born February 4, 1948. Better known as Alice Cooper, the black-clad rocker made a name for himself when he pushed the outrageousness of his proto-glam theatricality toward the macabre, becoming the primary architect of shock rock. Here’s Furnier in a Rolling Stone interview from last year, discussing his alter-ego…

I didn’t really figure it out until later. The Alice character was originally a victim. He represented all the disenfranchised kids that didn’t fit in, the kids that didn’t even listen to mainstream FM. These were the kids that were going to get bullied. These were the artistic kids. These were the kids not looking for something straight up. And there were lots of them.

When I got sober in 1982, I went, “I’m not that anymore. The character’s not that, so who’s he going to be? I want him to be this arrogant villain.Read the rest

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25 Years of “Wild at Heart”

Sailor

This year we celebrate the 25th anniversary of my favorite David Lynch film, Wild at Heart. Released in 1990, Wild tells the tale of Sailor and Lula, a red-hot couple who are reunited when Sailor is released from prison. The pair take off on a cross-country road trip that turns into a journey that resembles The Wizard of Oz on mushrooms. The film won the Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival before becoming mired in controversy. The movie’s opening scene finds Sailor (Nicolas Cage) smashing the head of a would-be attacker hired by Lula’s (Laura Dern) mother against a marble stair step until his brains slurp out of the back of his head. Commentators claimed to be shocked by the scene — and they probably were — but the reaction against the film seemed to have more to do with the overall violence of the bizarre imagery and strange set scenes that make up this weird and wonderful tale.… Read the rest

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Dolls on Film

Dolls

This New York Dolls documentary was just uncovered by Noisey and it’s required viewing for anyone interested in punk’s early greatest days. From the site…

Directed by Nadya Beck and Bob Gruen, All Dolled Up: A New York Dolls Story is a feature-length documentary that was filmed in 1972, and sees the then-married pair follow the band from their early performances in New York at Kenny’s Castaways and Max’s Kansas City to their infamous West Coast tour. Expect to see raucous, debaucherous backstage antics, illuminating interviews, footage from the Whisky A Go Go, the Real Don Steele Show, Rodney Bingenheimer’s E Club, and much more. The documentary features the entire original lineup—David Johansen (vocals), Johnny Thunders (guitar), Sylvain Sylvain (guitar), Arthur Kane (bass), and Billy Murcia (drums)—and captures an image of the band before death, alcohol, and heroin tore it asunder. It’s an intimate look at rock’n’roll’s greatest underdogs that took in too much, too soon, but still always came out swinging.

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Fear of a Black Planet 25 Years Later

Fear_of_a_Black_Planet

This year is the 25th anniversary of the release of the Public Enemy’s Fear of a Black Planet. The ambitious concept album followed-up on the success of It Takes a Nation of Millions to Hold Us Back. That album’s socio-political observations found the band comparing that record to Marvin Gaye’s What’s Goin’ On, but the musical ambitions of Planet put the band in mind of making a masterpiece — this was their Sgt. Pepper’s. I’m posting all the music below, but first, here’s the Futuristically Ancient site, explaining the collection’s iconic cover art…

…here is a post about the album cover for Public Enemy’s 1990 album, Fear of a Black Planet. The original album artwork was designed by NASA illustrator, B.E. Johnson, who is still known today for his space art. While the album is a commentary on dangerous results of white supremacy, both the tracks and the apocalyptic cover are a reminder of how fragile our world and all the things in it, including our steadfast beliefs, are.

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Terence McKenna’s Timewave

Time-Wave-Zero-Sept-2012

Keeping with my recent posts on all things eschatological, here is a charming-as-hell, cyberific video of Terence McKenna explaining his Timewave Zero theory. Listen closely with your third eye and draw your yarrow sticks with care…

Stay Awake!

Please subscribe to my YouTube channel where I archive all of the videos I curate at Insomnia. Click here to check out more Counter Culture posts.

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