Author Archive | majestic

The Uncensored Story of LA Artist/Occultist Marjorie Cameron

Many a disinfonaut knows the story of rocket scientist/occultist Jack Parsons, but have you heard of Marjorie Cameron, his wife and Kenneth Anger’s notorious “Scarlet Woman”? The New York Observer reports on a retrospective art exhibit focusing on Cameron’s work (if you’re in NYC, it runs until October 17th):

On Thursday night, a remembrance of sorts was held inside 76 Grand Street, the legendary former outpost, now reclaimed, of art dealer Jeffrey Deitch.

Close friends of occultist, artist, and iconic Los Angeles figure Marjorie Cameron gathered to share memories of the “Scarlet Woman” who starred in Kenneth Anger films and was married to rocket scientist Jack Parsons, amid a small but historic first East Coast survey of her artwork. The occasion for the panel on the woman and her work was a re-staging of the Los Angles Museum of Contemporary Art survey, or at least a portion of it, at the dealer’s Grand Street space.

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Are Alzheimer’s and Diabetes the Same Disease?

There’s a compelling link between obesity and Alzheimer’s disease, reports New Scientist:

Having type 2 diabetes may mean you are already on the path to Alzheimer’s. This startling claim comes from a study linking the two diseases more intimately than ever before. There is some good news: the same research also offers a way to reverse memory problems associated with diabetes – albeit in rats – which may hint at a new treatment for Alzheimer’s.

 More details This image shows a PiB-PET scan of a patient with Alzheimer's disease on the left and an elderly person with normal memory on the right. Areas of red and yellow show high concentrations of PiB in the brain and suggest high amounts of amyloid deposits in these areas. Credit: Klunkwe (CC)

This image shows a PiB-PET scan of a patient with Alzheimer’s disease on the left and an elderly person with normal memory on the right. Areas of red and yellow show high concentrations of PiB in the brain and suggest high amounts of amyloid deposits in these areas. Credit: Klunkwe (CC)


“Perhaps you should use Alzheimer’s drugs at the diabetes stage to prevent cognitive impairment in the first place,” says Ewan McNay from the University at Albany in New York.

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Tesla’s Dream Of Wireless Electricity Transmission Here At Last

Tesla Broadcast Tower 1904

Nikola Tesla’s Wardenclyffe lab building, seen in 1904.

Nikola Tesla’s grand plans for wireless transmission of electricity never quite panned out, but the Wall Street Journal is reporting that on a smaller scale, it’s now happening:

In 1902 workers completed a mysterious tower, 187 feet high and shaped like a giant mushroom, on which rested the hopes of one of the 20th century’s most prolific geniuses.

Facing the beach in the hamlet of Shoreham, N.Y., on Long Island, the Wardenclyffe Tower was, according to its inventor, Nikola Tesla, the key that could unlock an age of wonders.

As Mr. Tesla later wrote, the tower’s ability to transmit information to the far side of the Earth would someday allow the creation of “an inexpensive instrument, not bigger than a watch, [which] will enable its bearer to hear anywhere, on sea or land, music or song however distant.”

Future Tesla wireless power transmitter

A 1925 artist’s conception of what Nikola Tesla’s wireless power transmission system might look like in the future.

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Wall Street Deaths Gain Pace

The rising number of banker suicides has been written about here before; the New York Times now focuses on the increasing number of deaths, by suicide and otherwise, on Wall Street:

In retrospect, it was around Easter that John Hughes began to think something unusual was going on with his middle son, Thomas, a 29-year-old investment banker.

The Yale Club.

The Yale Club.


John’s former wife, Marypat, had arranged for brunch at the Yale Club, in Manhattan, with her three sons: Thomas, who worked at the Wall Street advisory firm Moelis & Company; John III, a young lawyer at Sullivan & Cromwell; and Joseph, an undergraduate at Fordham. The Yale Club, near Grand Central Terminal, was an easy enough trip on the train from her home in Westchester County, and an even easier one for her sons. But Thomas couldn’t make it. “There’s some big deal cooking at Moelis or whatever,” John recalls his son telling him.

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Breaking: Trans-Pacific Partnership Trade Deal Reached

The infamous Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) trade agreement has just been agreed to by the United States and Asian nations according to the New York Times:

The United States and 11 other Pacific Rim nations on Monday agreed to the largest regional trade accord in history, a potentially precedent-setting model for global commerce and worker standards that would tie together 40 percent of the world’s economy, from Canada and Chile to Japan and Australia.

TPP Leesburg Rally

The Trans-Pacific Partnership still faces months of debate in Congress and will inject a new flash point into both parties’ presidential contests.

But the accord — a product of nearly eight years of negotiations, including five days of round-the-clock sessions here — is a potentially legacy-making achievement for President Obama, and the capstone for his foreign policy “pivot” toward closer relations with fast-growing eastern Asia, after years of American preoccupation with the Middle East and North Africa.

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Have the secrets of a lost civilisation finally been unearthed?

There’s a resurgence of interest into the work of Graham Hancock with the release (already in the UK, forthcoming in the US) of the long-awaited follow-up to his classic Fingerprints of the Gods. Entitled Magicians of the Gods: The Forgotten Wisdom of Earth’s Lost Civilization, it has a whole new generation of readers and journalists asking questions about a forgotten civilization, including Rupert Hawksley at the Telegraph (who definitely is not a fan):

When I eventually reach Graham Hancock’s house, I am late and out of breath. The amateur archaeologist lives in a grand slab of a place halfway up one of Bath’s lung-busting hills and I have been struggling with a bag full of his bestselling books.

Graham Hancock on Good and Evil

The 65-year-old opens his imposing front door, waves away my apologies, and ushers me straight down to his study, which is spilling over with books and expensive-looking curiosities. He offers me a cup of coffee and enquires about my journey.

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Future Weapons Will Alter Human DNA And Cause Genetic Mutations

The future is a scary place; Sputnik reports on weapons that will change the geophysical landscape and alter human DNA:

Future wars will have much more devastating weapons than airstrikes, tanks and even nuclear weapons. Russia’s Ministry of Emergency Situations warned about new threats, including geophysical and genetic weapons that could pose threats to Russia’s well-being in the future.


Future weapons will be based on energy, electromagnetic, radiological, geophysical and genetic principles. There will also be special information weapons to change people’s perception, completely changing their mind, the Ministry said.

Geophysical weapons that can alter the weather were already talked about in the past. People even wondered whether some hurricanes and earthquakes were “natural” disasters, speculating that it was possible to alter the climate and set off earthquakes using electromagnetic fields.

These deadly weapons of the future will target main control centers, essential facilities, technology, infrastructure and population.

Future weapons will disrupt the physical processes that occur on the Earth and change people’s DNA, causing genetic mutations and diseases.

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The Military Industrial Complex

An art installation  and talk by Bonnie Camplin at the South London Gallery examined the notorious Military Industrial Complex and brings in a plethora of conspiracy theories along the way:

This live work by Bonnie Camplin took the form of a study room exploring what ‘consensus reality’ is and how it is formed. Drawing from an interdisciplinary array of materials and theories, from physics to philosophy, psychology, witchcraft, quantum theory and warfare, The Military Industrial Complex examined the anxieties caused by the categorisation of lived experiences as valid or deviant, questioning how the actual locus of madness is located and identified.


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A Map of Bohemian Grove, the Place where Masters of the Universe Play Summer Camp

Remember when Alex Jones, Jon Ronson and others took it upon themselves to sneak into Bohemian Grove to try to confirm rumors of all sorts of sordid activities by the so-called “elites”? Vox takes a look at a 1950s map that may have led to some of the hysteria:

Bohemian Grove is one of the most secretive places in the world, a Northern California campground that’s a play land for the rich and powerful, with lore that claims it holds Illuminati meetings. It also has a charming map just like Disney World.

grove detail

Detail from cartograph of the Bohemian Grove, Sonoma County, California, David Rumsey Historical Map Collection.


This 1952 map, created by Gus Schneider and available via the David Rumsey Map Collection, was handed out to attendees when they arrived at their Sonoma County, California, destination; the back included a helpful directory (you can zoom around the full map here).

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The nudists, doctors, and true believers who built vegetarianism

Believe it or not, refusing to eat meat was once considered to be a radical act, reports Vox:

Today, October 1, is World Vegetarian Day. The North American Vegetarian Society started the holiday in 1977, and the International Vegetarian Society picked it up the next year. But the history of vegetarianism in the West stretches back far, far earlier, all the way to the 19th century. And the early days were … well, sometimes they were a bit weird.

Back in the 1800s, people in England first began to organize groups that promoted vegetarianism as a means of preserving animal life. The 1809 founding of the Bible Christian Church marked an early starting point, and other organizations — both religious and secular — followed. As early as 1811, potential vegetarians could find arguments in books like John Newton’s strident testimonial The Return to Nature:


In the ensuing decades, vegetarianism grew in popularity, thanks to advocacy from some religious groups and support from parts of the medical community (one example, from 1838: Vegetable Diet, as Sanctioned by Medical Men, and by Experience in All Ages).

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