Author Archive | majestic

The Small Penis Party

Gents: Would you go to a small penis party, even if you had one? A man in Britain thinks others will join him at the first such event reports i100:

At four inches erect, Ant Smith’s penis is smaller than average. And it’s taken him a long time to be OK with that.

"Soft ruler" by Lite (CC)

“Soft ruler” by Lite (CC)

 

The 48-year-old first started talking about his penis size two years ago. Since then he has released a poem ‘Shorty’ about his “crooked little finger”, performed around the country and received national press attention.

Now he is organising the first ever ‘Big Small Penis’ party. The cabaret evening is aimed at one thing – making people celebrate “tiny todgers, compact cocks, wee willies, mini members, and dinky dicks”.

“I think it’s really important to maintain a balanced sense of fun. That’s why I’m creating a celebratory party. I’ve got various thoughts on what is a good and what is a bad small penis joke.

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The Pink Pill: Viagra for the Female Brain

Nicknamed the “little pink pill,” flibanserin may be the female Viagra, the first drug intended to enhance the libido of women. Yahoo Global News Anchor Katie Couric reports:

Thirty-year-old Katherine Campbell has no desire for sex. “After my first son was born, I noticed it right away. It was there one day, gone the next,” Campbell tells Yahoo Global News Anchor Katie Couric. The married mother of two says she suffers from hypoactive sexual desire disorder, a condition characterized by chronic low libido in women. Experts in the field say it’s related to brain function.

“We know there is this area of the limbic system that is associated with the neurotransmitters dopamine and norepinephrine that is functioning differently in the women with HSDD,” says Leah Millheiser, MD, director of the Female Sexual Medicine Program at Stanford School of Medicine.

A company called Sprout Pharmaceuticals has been lobbying the Food and Drug Administration to approve its experimental drug, which would be the first treatment of its kind for this problem.

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ISIS End Game: Apocalypse

According to CNN‘s National Security Analyst Peter Bergen, ISIS actions only make sense if you realize that its aim is the apocalypse and its supporters believe we are living in the end times:

A key window into understanding ISIS is its English language “in-flight magazine” Dabiq. Last week the seventh issue of Dabiq was released, and a close reading of it helps explains ISIS’ world view.

The mistake some make when viewing ISIS is to see it as a rational actor. Instead, as the magazine documents, its ideology is that of an apocalyptic cult that believes that we are living in the end times and that ISIS’ actions are hastening the moment when this will happen.

IS insurgents, Anbar Province, Iraq.jpg

The name of the Dabiq magazine itself helps us understand ISIS’ worldview. The Syrian town of Dabiq is where the Prophet Mohammed is supposed to have predicted that the armies of Islam and “Rome” would meet for the final battle that will precede the end of time and the triumph of true Islam.

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Animated Life: Pangea (The Story of Alfred Wegener)

This animated documentary by Flora Lichtman and Sharon Shattuck tells the story of polar explorer Alfred Wegener, the unlikely scientist behind continental drift theory.

Alfred Wegener.jpg

Alfred Wegener in 1925

Lichtman and Shattuck have written some text to accompany the film at the New York Times:

Just as biology tells us about the origin of life, geology tells how our physical world came to be. The field explains how the mountains and rivers, oceans and shores were born. Surprisingly, one of the first people to propose one of the most important theories in geology, continental drift — the idea that the continents were once pressed together and have since drifted apart — wasn’t a geologist at all.

In this film, we celebrate Alfred Wegener, who studied astronomy, worked as an atmospheric physicist, and seemed happiest exploring Greenland on grueling multiyear expeditions. How did someone with no training in geology come up with a theory that is now central to earth science?

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Smoking Skunk Triples Chances of Psychosis

Cannabis Plant.jpg

Cannabis Training University (CC)

Hey stoners, did you know that smoking your favorite skunk weed triples your chances of psychosis? From BBC News:

Smoking potent cannabis was linked to 24% of new psychosis cases analysed in a study by King’s College London.

The research suggests the risk of psychosis is three times higher for users of potent “skunk-like” cannabis than for non-users.

The study of 780 people was carried out by KCL’s Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience.

A Home Office spokesman said the report underlines the reasons why cannabis is illegal.

Scientists found the risk of psychosis was five times higher for those who use it every day compared with non-users.

They also concluded the use of hash, a milder form of the drug, was not associated with increased risk of psychosis.

Psychosis refers to delusions or hallucinations that can be present in certain psychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

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Brain-Altering Devices Now Available

Imagine this: you can change your mood without drugs, meditation, or any of the other more or less undesirable techniques now in use for mood alteration. How? With brain-altering devices now coming to market, reports the Daily Dot:

It feels like a long time since the Quantified Self movement caught us in its clutches. The first fitness bands and their corresponding apps sucked us in; the ability to monitor self-defined statistics made us feel more in control of ourselves. It’s part narcissism, part hypervigilance.

(C) Zen Vibez

(C) Zen Vibez

 

But the most significant roadblock has been taking all the information we’re self-quantifying and acting on it. You know you’re taking 1,000 too few steps a day, eating 500 more calories than you should, and getting only a fraction of the outside time you need; actually doing something with the data is the hard part.

Motivation and habit change are hard, and no heart-monitoring bracelet is going to magically solve that problem.

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The Three Most Desirable Jobs in Britain: Author, Librarian, Academic

It seems that Britain is about to change from a nation of shopkeepers to a nation of bookworms if this report in the Independent is to be believed:

Forget dreams of a glittering career in Premier League football or Hollywood. The three most desirable jobs in Britain are an author, a librarian and an academic, according to a new study that suggests the country is increasingly bookish in its career aspirations.

British Museum Reading Room by Eneas (CC)

British Museum Reading Room by Eneas (CC)

 

The “aura of prestige” connected with a career in writing or academia is preferable to jobs that brought promises of wealth and celebrity status, according to a Yougov survey with more than 14,000 respondents.

Being an author was the most popular choice among both men and women, with more than 60 per cent selecting it as their dream job. It was followed by a career as a librarian (54 per cent) and in academia (51 per cent).

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2015 Watkins Spiritual 100 List

Dalai Lama (14481761838).jpg

Dalai Lama by Christopher Michel (CC)

Watkins Books has published its annual “most spiritual” people list for 2015, including quite a few friends and allies of disinformation®. Check out all one hundred names here; the top ten are:

1. Dalai Lama
2. Pope Francis
3. Eckhart Tolle
4. Thich Nhat Hanh
5. Desmond Tutu
6. Deepak Chopra
7. Paulo Coelho
8. Oprah Winfrey
9. Ram Dass
10. Alice Walker

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The Latest Economic Conspiracy Theory

USCurrency Federal Reserve.jpgConspiracy theories and money go together like … [fill in the simile]. From Bloomberg View:

Friday’s jobs numbers were big, and the revisions below the surface were huge. Yet even before the release, the birther/vaxxer/flat-earther crowd had warned us about phony numbers. As public policy, this kind of conspiracy thinking can cause the deaths of infants and the elderly. At least in markets, it merely loses you money.

In December, I wrote:

Today’s column is about stupidity. Perhaps that’s overstating it; to be more precise, it is about the conspiracy-theorist combination of bias, innumeracy and laziness, with a pinch of arrogance thrown in for good measure.

I am talking about the manifold ways various economic reports get misinterpreted, sometimes in a willful and ignorant manner.

That column discussed some of the sillier theories from within the darker corners of the Internet. Admittedly, these weren’t from influential people or important media outlets; it was the usual collection of oddballs in tinfoil hats.

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The Movement To Completely Change The Way You Get High

“Cannabis is joining the coca leaf in the ranks of drugs improved by technology,” claims Cece Lederer at Kernel:

“I’ve got something special for us,” A.J. said as I cued up my recording device. “Have you ever done dabs?”

A.J. is about as close to weed royalty as you can get. If you’ve heard of Sour Diesel, you’ve heard of him. He’s cultivated some of the most potent strains of marijuana and has large-scale grow facilities clamoring for his advice.

Butane honey oil after being whipped 2

Butane honey oil with cannabis sativa exterior trimmings, by Vjiced (CC)

Careful to keep it horizontal, he unzipped a rolling suitcase and took out a blowtorch. Then came the “rig.” At first it looked like a regular water pipe, but instead of a slide, there was a ceramic “nail” that resembled a bird bath for a dollhouse.

Then came the jars. “The flavor is in the liquid,” he said as he put a jar of brown oil on my coffee table.

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