Author Archive | Marcie Gainer

An Essay on Time From a Dying Neurosurgeon: “Most ambitions are either achieved or abandoned; either way, they belong to the past.”

Screen Shot 2015-04-25 at 11.27.31 AM

Paul Kalanithi, a neurosurgeon, knew he was dying. His time was limited, and after being released from the hospital due to a relapse in lung cancer, his daughter was born. For him, the expectation of death warped time. Now, the hours in a day, the minutes in an hour, meant something different.

Here’s his moving adieu to the world.

He died on March 9, 2015 at the age of 37.

Paul Kalanithi writes at Stanford Medicine:

There are two strategies to cutting the time short, like the tortoise and the hare. The hare moves as fast as possible, hands a blur, instruments clattering, falling to the floor; the skin slips open like a curtain, the skull flap is on the tray before the bone dust settles. But the opening might need to be expanded a centimeter here or there because it’s not optimally placed. The tortoise proceeds deliberately, with no wasted movements, measuring twice, cutting once.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

There is no evidence that the death penalty acts as a deterrent

Patrick Feller (CC BY 2.0)

Patrick Feller (CC BY 2.0)

Carolyn Hoyle, University of Oxford and Roger Hood, University of Oxford

Australia has executed no-one for half a century. Following the abolition of the death penalty by various states, the federal government abolished capital punishment in 1973.

Nevertheless, Australian citizens – like all of those from abolitionist jurisdictions – face the death penalty when they commit serious crimes in countries that retain it. Bali Nine pair Andrew Chan and Myuran Sukumaran are facing execution in Indonesia following their convictions on drug trafficking charges almost ten years ago. On Saturday, they and seven others were given official notice that they will be killed by firing squad on the prison island of Nusakambangan. Under Indonesian law, the minimum period between receiving notice and execution is 72 hours.

Indonesian President Joko Widodo, popularly known as Jokowi, has insisted all along that he will reject clemency petitions for drug traffickers on death row.… Read the rest

Continue Reading

Paul Stamets Holds the Patent That Could Put Monsanto Out of Business

PaulStamets

Paul Stamets, a leading mycologist, has discovered a way to keep insects off crops without the need for chemical-pesticides. Stamets’ “pesticide,” dubbed SMART pesticides, uses “entomopathogenic fungi (fungi that destroys insects).” It is able to control over 200,000 species of pests and he patented it back in 2006.

via Earth. We Are One:

If there’s anything you read – or share – let this be it. The content of this article has potential to radically shift the world in a variety of positive ways.

And as Monsanto would love for this article to not go viral, all we can ask is that you share, share, share the information being presented so that it can reach as many people as possible.

In 2006, a patent was granted to a man named Paul Stamets. Though Paul is the world’s leading mycologist, his patent has received very little attention and exposure. Why is that? Stated by executives in the pesticide industry, this patent represents “the most disruptive technology we have ever witnessed.” And when the executives say disruptive, they are referring to it being disruptive to the chemical pesticides industry.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

The Calbuco Volcano in Chile Has Erupted — Here’s a Video

This is the first time in four decades that the Calbuco volcano has erupted. It blasted twice on Wednesday and about 5,000 people have evacuated.

Devastatingly beautiful.

According to NPR:

The Calbuco volcano in southern Chile erupted this week for the first time in four decades. Quiet since 1972, it’s blown twice since Wednesday, generating striking images and concerns over the effects of both the lava and a mammoth cloud of ash.

That column of ejected ash measures nearly 7 miles, says Chile’s National Mining and Geology Service, citing a “flyby” that was made early Thursday. In its latest update, the agency says volcanic activity is finally diminishing but that a state of emergency remains for a 12-mile area.

Saying 5,000 people have left the area around the volcano, NPR’s Lourdes Garcia-Navarro reports, “Local officials say people are very, very frightened. The immediate concern is the volcano’s eruption could trigger snow melts and cause flooding.”

Read the rest

Continue Reading

Invasion of the earthworms, mapped and analyzed

This small worm -- Dendrobaena octaedra, sometimes called the octagonal-tail worm -- measures less than an inch long, but the invasive species is impacting the ecology of the boreal forest in Alberta. CREDIT Photo courtesy of Erin Cameron, University of Alberta.

This small worm — Dendrobaena octaedra, sometimes called the octagonal-tail worm — measures less than an inch long, but the invasive species is impacting the ecology of the boreal forest in Alberta.
Photo courtesy of Erin Cameron, University of Alberta.

The Ohio State University via EurekAlert:

COLUMBUS, Ohio–An international research team is bringing a new weapon to bear against invasive earthworms.

The ongoing research project at The Ohio State University, the University of Alberta and Simon Fraser University uses statistical analysis to forecast one worm species’ spread, in hopes of finding ways to curtail it.

Most recently, they’ve focused on the boreal forest of northern Alberta. No native worms live in the forest whatsoever; the region had been worm-free since the last ice age 11,000 years ago, until invasive European species began working their way across the United States and Canada. The worms have only recently invaded Alberta.

In the journal Computational Statistics and Data Analysis, the researchers project that by 2056, one of those invasive species–Dendrobaena octaedra, sometimes called the octagonal-tail worm–will expand its territory from 3 percent of the Alberta boreal forest to 39 percent.

Read the rest
Continue Reading