Articles by Ed Snowden

With prognosticators claiming that Senator Chuck Schumer (D-NY)’s re-election campaign is full-steam ahead, activist/writer/playwright/Brooklynite Sander Hicks is running for the Senate on a platform of “true transparency,” and economic and leadership policies focused on peace. We had an exchange about immigration, anthrax, the finer points of the alleged 9/11 cover-up, the BP oil spill disaster, the trial of Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, and — that old, beaten-horse topic for Green Party candidates — in essence, the ambiguity of saying Republicans are worse.

Sander Hicks

1. On your campaign page, you hold up Cesar Chavez as an example of non-violence. In light of recent events in Arizona and the passage of controversial immigration legislation, how does Mr. Chavez’s opposition to illegal immigration function alongside your personal views of border control? (This is what I’m talking about.)

Is attempting to apply restrictions on human movements through the enforcement of borders ever inherently racist?

Any good labor leader will want to protect against strike-breakers. This is what Chavez was dealing with — illegals were being hired to cross picket lines and scab on the union.

The ideal immigration policy would make it easier to become a citizen. We need to create more jobs in this country so that we’re not at each others’ throats competing for a such a small number of jobs…




If you fill out and send in this form, you can remove you or your ward’s name from a list of prospective American military recruits. Its completion moves a name into a “suppression file” in the Department of Defense’s Joint Advertising and Marketing Research & Studies. This makes it much harder for military recruiters to reach out to a prospective recruit whose contact information they may have acquired in various ways. Federal law actually requires that they have as much access to high school students as any other prospective employer.

Sesame Street has become loved and reviled for its socially-conscious programming; in one famous example from 1983, after an actor on the show died, Sesame Street took the chance to impart to very young children the temporal nature of human existence by marking his character’s death on the show. The forward-thinking episode invited some degree of opposition because even adults When Families Grievethemselves continue to find death very uncomfortable or even impossible to psychologically confront.

Premiering tonight on PBS at 8 p.m. EDT is a program, “When Families Grieve,” that features four families, two of which features fathers from the American military…