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Tangerine Dream Founder Edgar Froese Dead at 70

Ralf Roletschek via Wikimedia Commons.

Ralf Roletschek via Wikimedia Commons.

Daniel Kreps writes at Rolling Stone:

Edgar Froese, founding member and keyboardist of the long-running band Tangerine Dream and an electronic music pioneer, passed away after suffering a pulmonary embolism on January 20th. Froese was 70.

“This is a message to you we are very sorry for… On January 20th, Tuesday afternoon, Edgar Froese suddenly and unexpectedly passed away from the effects of a pulmonary embolism in Vienna,” the band posted on Facebook Friday afternoon. “The sadness in our hearts is immensely. Edgar once said: ‘There is no death, there is just a change of our cosmic address.’ Edgar, this is a little comfort to us.”

Formed in 1967 in West Berlin and born out of the same Krautrock scene that produced Kraftwerk, Cluster, Neu! and Can, Tangerine Dream’s 1970 debut LP Electronic Meditation, which featured fellow electronic music giant Klaus Schulz, shared many of the same musical qualities as their German peers.

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Read The Very First Comic Book: The Adventures of Obadiah Oldbuck

 

Obadiah Oldbuck

Via Open Culture.com

Comic books, as any enthusiast of comics books won’t hesitate to tell you, have a long and robust history, one that extends far wider and deeper than the 20th-century caped musclemen, carousing teenagers, and wisecracking animals so many associate with the medium. The scholarship on comic-book history — still a relatively young field, you understand — has more than once revised its conclusions on exactly how far back its roots go, but as of now, the earliest acknowledged comic book dates to 1837.

The Adventures of Obadiah Oldbuck, according to thecomicbooks.com’s page on early comic-book history, “was done by Switzerland’s Rudolphe Töpffer, who has been considered in Europe (and starting to become here in America) as the creator of the picture story. He created the comic strip in 1827,” going on to create comic books “that were extremely successful and reprinted in many different languages; several of them had English versions in America in 1846.

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Rare Paintings by Occultist Aleister Crowley to Show in New York

There’s more than a few Crowleyites among disinfonauts, so if any of you can get to New York for the Outsider Art Fair (January 29-February 1, 2015) you may be interested to view some original Aleister Crowley paintings. They’re being presented by Collective 777 (Art Guild of the Ordo Templi Orientis Australia):

An English artist, mystic, ceremonial magician, poet and occultist, Crowley revelled in his notoriety, pleased that the press labeled him ‘the wickedest man in the world’ and ‘The Beast 666’. In 1920, Crowley travelled to Cefalu, Sicily to establish The Abbey of Thelema. While there he created a central room which became known as The Chamber of Nightmares. He painted the walls with a range of images designed to challenge his students. “The purpose of these pictures,” wrote Crowley, “is to enable people, by contemplation, to purify their minds.” While the Abbey itself is now lost, a handful of the artworks remain.

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HP Lovecraft’s ‘The Colour Out of Space’

H. P. Lovecraft, June 1934.jpg

H. P. Lovecraft, June 1934

[Excerpted from Reclaiming Art in the Age of Artifice: A Treatise, Critique, and Call to Action (Manifesto) by JF Martel]

Published in 1927, H. P. Lovecraft’s story “The Colour Out of Space can be read as a prophecy of this new spectral age that isolates the properly aesthetic component of the social order that would rise in the postwar era. An unnamed narrator attempts to uncover the truth behind a “blasted heath” shunned by the people of a rural New England county. From a possibly insane old man, he learns that a meteorite fell at that spot several decades ago, bringing with it a diabolical entity from outer space. Interestingly the creature does not take the form of the usual space invader but of a mass of unearthly color. As the story unfolds we learn how this malignant color warped and withered the surrounding vegetation, mutated wildlife and livestock, and caused the madness or death of the unfortunate souls who lived closest to its lair.… Read the rest

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Selma blurs line between past and present

Selma director and co-writer Ava DuVernay has crafted a new and important vision of an oft-examined era in our nation’s history. Stanley Wolfson/Library of Congress

Selma director and co-writer Ava DuVernay has crafted a new and important vision of an oft-examined era in our nation’s history.
Stanley Wolfson/Library of Congress

By Mary Schmitt, University of California, Irvine

Hollywood films that depict American history deeply influence our sense of national identity. Films that portray Civil Rights and Black Freedom history are particularly important.

Beyond entertaining moviegoers, films like Glory and Remember the Titans have served as barometers of US race relations. As (mostly) stories of progress and triumph, they provide us with the picture of morality we wish to project as the world’s leading superpower.

Needless to say, who gets to tell these stories, how they are told and why they are told is no simple matter. In her new film Selma, director and co-writer Ava DuVernay plunges into the history of the Civil Rights movement, and emerges with a new and important vision of an oft-examined era in our nation’s history.… Read the rest

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Berenice — A Tale by Edgar Allan Poe

Simon Pearson CC BY-ND 2.0)

Simon Pearson (CC BY-ND 2.0)

In honor of Edgar Allan Poe’s 206th Birthday, here’s his short story of teeth and love: “Berenice.” It was published in the Southern Literary Messenger in 1835. Publisher Thomas W. White received multiple complaints about the story’s graphic and disturbing content and thus he removed four paragraphs for the 1840 version. Poe, of course, disagreed with White’s decision, saying that this was a good opportunity for the Southern Literary Messenger to become a famous magazine. He admitted, “I allow that it approaches the very verge of bad taste – but I will not sin quite so egregiously again.” (via Wikipedia.)

MISERY is manifold. The wretchedness of earth is multiform. Overreaching the wide horizon like the rainbow, its hues are as various as the hues of that arch, as distinct too, yet as intimately blended. Overreaching the wide horizon like the rainbow! How is it that from Beauty I have derived a type of unloveliness?… Read the rest

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Pale Emperor In The Mirror

First, a confession. I feel uncomfortable reviewing Marilyn Manson’s “The Pale Emperor.” I mean, I’m thirty six, for christ’s sake. Haven’t we outgrown the shock rocker of the 90s, and the androgynous king of self indulgence that followed in the 00s, finally bottoming out in almost overnight, Robert Smithesque debauch that spurned on memes like:

Well. Haven’t we all outgrown it?

I think that’s precisely the point. You get the sense throughout this album of a kind of dawning, bleary eyed sobriety. The album gets more raw as it goes. Seven days? Imagine waking up from a twenty year long binge. And your alter ego once took control of the airwaves, it took over your personal life, and only when that was smoking wreckage did you manage to take a look backward and see the alter ego staring back at you. And on the other hand is the ever immanent grave.… Read the rest

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The Hunter S. Thompson Fireball Trick

For all you Hunter S. Thompson fans out there, here’s a handful of first-hand Hunter stories from the Indie Bohemians Morning Show. A morning show, for people who hate morning shows.

Ron Placone was fully aware that Mack Dryden had first hand experience with Hunter S Thompson. So, he ended their interview by asking Mack to share some of those stories. Mack recalls Hunter’s fireball trick, where he would literally blow a flame towards someone, Hunter’s impulse to buy a boat one day in Key West, and more. These are just a few first hand accounts that confirm what we kinda already knew, yup, he was that weird. Yup, he lived it.

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