Archive | Art

Remembering Wes Craven

Cinema lost a giant last night as horror master Wes Craven passed away from brain cancer. Craven was a powerhouse in the horror world, bringing us classics such as The Last House on the Left, The Hills Have Eyes, and the Nightmare on Elm Street and Scream franchises.

While we horror aficionados will lament his passing, we can rest assured that his legacy will live on.

Notable Quotes:

“I believe the cinema is one of our principal forms of art. It is an incredibly powerful way to tell uplifting stories that can move people to cry with joy and inspire them to reach for the stars.”

“I think there is something about the American dream, the sort of Disneyesque dream, if you will, of the beautifully trimmed front lawn, the white picket fence, mom and dad and their happy children, God-fearing and doing good whenever they can, and the flip side of it, the kind of anger and the sense of outrage that comes from discovering that that’s not the truth of the matter, that gives American horror films, in some ways, kind of an additional rage.”

“The horrors of retirement.… Read the rest

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TRIALOGUES

Bobby Campbell (CC BY 2.0)

Bobby Campbell (CC BY 2.0)

I find the series of Trialogues conducted between Terence McKenna, Rupert Sheldrake, and Ralph Abraham endlessly fascinating. I have listened with inflamed imagination to their discussions ad infinitum, finding them thus far inexhaustibly thought provoking.

For the most complete collection (42+ hours) of their discussions I refer you to The Psychedelic Salon’s Trialogues Archive. (It includes numerous recordings of their private discussions donated by Ralph Abraham.)

Though before I try to sell you on the deep cuts, let’s parade out the hits:

METAMORPHOSIS: CAST OF CHARACTERS

TRIALOGUES AT THE EDGE OF THE MILLENNIUM – June 6, 1998
Part 1: SHELDRAKE
Part 2: MCKENNA
Part 3: ABRAHAM

As perhaps one of the world’s biggest fans of this material, I dreamed the dream of getting to actively participate in the discussion, and in my own silly way, via e-mail, got to do just that.

from: Bobby Campbell weirdoverse@gmail.com
to: Ralph Abraham, Rupert Sheldrake
date: Thu, Jan 31, 2008 at 1:47 PM
subject: Hello again, Ralph & Rupert!

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The Lost Spiritual Path in Wes Anderson’s Films

11783040314_4e4dae9a6c_zOn elephant journal, I explore what happened to the aspect of Wes Anderson’s older films in which a white male undergoes a transformation to a new paradigm of living:

About a decade ago, acclaimed director Wes Anderson started taking some flak for what critics perceived as repetition of childish content, or content he had imagined in his youth. I didn’t agree with the Hollywood echo chamber at the time, but I also never really got Anderson’s films until “The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou” (2004). Despite being a twentysomething, I related far too much to Bill Murray’s rendition of a man in mid-life crisis.

As I reacquainted myself with Anderson’s back catalogue (and discovered his feature debut, “Bottle Rocket”, from 1996), I started to notice symbols, character types and traits that reappear in a seemingly intentional way: the overachieving kid, the has-been adult, the disgruntled wife, ex-wife, or widow and even the pregnant woman.

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It should be a capitalist flop, but Banksy’s Dismaland is pure magic

Banksy Releases Promo Video for Dismaland

It’s not easy being a superstar anti-establishment art celebrity. Back in the late 1990s I was one of a group of art students who, for a time, became mildly famous as art pranksters. Within the group we could never be sure – and this despite our most earnest efforts – that our work really was the stuff of revolution. But we were in the papers. We were on the Turner Prize programme. We were even offered a book deal. Nonetheless it’s hard to maintain revolutionary kudos once you’ve been interviewed by Timmy Mallett.

And so I feel for Banksy. In Bristol, his street-pieces are still powerful landmarks even if we know, and he knows, what a dichotomy he represents, caught somewhere between art and artifice; an anarchist in capitalist giftwrap.

This being so, I was not expecting much from his latest hyped-up creation, Dismaland. I assumed it would be trying too hard to recapture that lost edginess; that old sold-out soul.… Read the rest

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Westboro Baptist Church gets Rick Roll’d

This is a thing of great beauty.

Daniel Kreps via Rolling Stone:

Foo Fighters performed Friday night at Kansas City’s Sprint Center, and is customary anytime Dave Grohl visits the Missouri city, the Westboro Baptist Church was situated outside the venue protesting the gig. In August 2011, the Foo Fighters hijacked the Westboro protests with an impromptu flatbed concert.. This time around, the church’s hateful placards and chants were drowned out by the sounds of Rick Astley’s “Never Gonna Give You Up” blasting out of a pickup truck with the Foo Fighters onboard.

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L$D by A$AP Rocky – When Psychedelics Go Mainstream

I sort of can’t believe I’m posting a video that already has over 19 million hits, but I’m actually posting this precisely BECAUSE it has over 19 million hits. This may be the best example of psychedelic drugs going full on mainstream that I can think of in recent memory. I mean, this is a song and video about tripping on acid….by a commercial hip hop artist. File it in the “things I never thought I’d see in my lifetime” category.

Is it good? Yeah, not bad. I could do without the prototypical “materialism and misogyny” bling rap breakdown, but you know, catchy tune. Will have to give more of A$AP’s stuff a listen here when I have a minute. I give the video higher marks for catching what would in my mind be a rather mild potency acid experience. Props to Mr. Rocky for pulling off the “holy crap am I tripping balls right now” face right before the rap breakdown.… Read the rest

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Joseph Marr’s Raspberry-Flavored Sugar Skull

skull-1

Joseph Marr, a Berlin-based, Australian-born artist, creates stunning sugar sculptures of the human body. He explains:

Working with sugar is wonderful and difficult. Its so colourful and textural, having similarities to paint. But then there is the temperature which is firstly dangerous but also it drops so quickly which influences the viscosity, so I find myself having to work really quickly to get what I need. It’s a sensory overload, the smell, the colour, the heat and the honey like movement… it’s sharp like glass and smooth like Marble and at the same time rough like concrete… unpredictable.

His work deals primarily with consciousness, focusing on “issues of desire and mortality.” Last year, Marr contributed this life-sized, edible sugar skull to an art exhibit organized by the Skull Appreciate Society to raise money for Live Life Give Life, an organ donation charity organization.

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A Life Amongst Art

For over 50 years, Los Angeles resident Enrique Serrato has been building an impressive collection of American, Chicano and Mexican art that now exceeds 6000 pieces covering ceramics, paintings, sculpture and outsider art. Unlike the Vogels, Mr. Serrato kept his collection private for more than 35 years, and only recently opened his collection to a small group of Los Angeleno artists and collectors. Mr. Serrato lives in a two-bedroom apartment and surrounds himself with his ever-growing collection which has been called Los Angeles’ best kept secret. Filmed by Patrick Kennedy.

Watch part one of this fascinating documentary here:

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