Archive | Art

Charles Bukowski On Writing

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I try to do all of my writing during the week. Songs I’ll write anytime. Poems anytime. But everything else gets pushed away at least once a week. It seems I’m always editing something or getting a blog post together by Sunday evening, but mostly, during the weekends, words are for reading.

Nowadays that means reading the articles I’ve streamlined into my Flipboard feed. I’ve got a pretty big ass phone at this point and it doubles as a very readable, little tablet.

This weekend I came across some news that a new Charles Bukowski book was going to be released. On Writing illuminates the author’s wordcraft with the help of a hitherto undiscovered cache of Buk’s letters.

“If a man truly desires to write, then he will. Rejection and ridicule will only strengthen him …There is no losing in writing, it will make your toes laugh as you sleep, it will make you stride like a tiger, it will fire the eye and put you face to face with death.

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Horror Occult Geekery: The Psychedelic Secret of Dario Argento’s SUSPIRIA

This article contains spoilers for the 1977 film SUSPIRIA.

Watch it.

Preferably while comfortably dosed up on your favourite psychedelic substance.

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I’ve been an ardent fan of the shadowy occult strangeness found in late 70s-early 80s Italian horror flicks for a good chunk of this incarnation, for reasons I used to find hard to fathom.

I’ve often felt too that there was some concrete textual core shared between a lot of these movies, specifically the films that came in the wake of the briefly popular “Giallo” subgenre. Giallo, a genre where POV killers adorned with black leather gloves go on fetishised killing sprees as clueless detectives scratch their heads in an artistically blood-spattered wake. In which the camera was the killer.

These post-Giallos, mainly of Argento’s own making, but also the more ethereal Zombie films of Lucio Fulci, i.e. Gates of Hell (aka City of The Living Dead) and The Beyond (aka Seven Doors of Death), seem to share some dark strand of DNA between them.… Read the rest

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Gonzo Box

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I was recently reading a fun UPROXX article about Hunter S. Thompson’s appearing in pop culture. Of course this didn’t include the good doctor’s own contributions to said pop culture. This article mostly talked about biopics like Where the Buffalo Roam, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, and The Rum Diaries. But it was also smart enough to mention Spider Jerusalem in the mix and savvy commenters were quick to add Colonel Hunter Gathers from the Venture Bros. cartoon.

I really like all of these Hunter happenings, but nothing beats the man himself. Here’s a bit about the Gonzo Tapes which give us the clearest glimpse we’re likely to get of the mad one’s demons and angels…

…from early missives on the Hells Angels and classic selections from Thompson’s seminal Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas to trenchant 1972 presidential campaign coverage and reportage from the front lines of the Vietnam War.Read the rest

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Salvador Dalí’s Rare, Erotic Vintage Cookbook

dali_lesdinersdegalaSalvador Dali fans, Brain Pickings features your hero’s cookbook, and quite a feast it is:

“When I was six years old,” Salvador Dalí once professed, “I wanted to be a cook.” But it wasn’t until his late sixties that he channeled his childhood fantasy into Les Diners de Gala — a lavishly illustrated cookbook, originally published in 1973 and featuring Dalí’s intensely erotic etchings and paintings. The twelve chapters each cover a specific class of dishes — from exotic courses to fish and shellfish to vegetables — rendered with a surrealist twist both gastronomically and aesthetically, but nowhere more so than in the tenth chapter, dedicated to aphrodisiacs.

Prefacing the recipes is Dalí’s unambiguous cautionary disclaimer, penned at the dawn of the first major dieting era of popular culture:

We would like to state clearly that, beginning with the very first recipes, Les Diners de Gala, with its precepts and its illustrations, is uniquely devoted to the pleasures of Taste.

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Artist’s Grotesqueries Confront Biotechnology

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Australian artist Patricia Piccinini creates hybrid sculptures that echo modern science’s obsession with biotechnology and bioengineering. Her work is currently being exhibited the Galway International Arts Festival in Galway, Ireland. She’s known for her “Skywhale” hot air balloon, which is basically a giant turtle with draping nipples.

Read more about her work at Beautiful Decay and Hi Fructose.

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Ben & Jerry’s flavors we’d actually like to see

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Vermont is a terrible place. In fact, it’s the only state in the Union of which nothing nice at all can be said.*

Moose attacks. Forests teeming with flesh craving, lyme disease infested vulture ticks. More extraterrestrial anal probings per anorectum capita than any place on Earth. Blizzards of bloody ice and frogs. Bed and Breakfasts. Skeleton Witches. Flannel.

To most of us, however, Vermont is only known for three things: Maple syrup (a sticky insect attractant that tastes like bark and is poured from the head of an effigy of a woman molded in glass — no thank you!), Bernie Sanders (“…there’s too many varieties of deodorant. All you need is Victory antiperspirant: Only people guilty of ThoughtCrime sweat!”) and of course, Ben & Jerry’s ice cream.

An ice cream so foul and perverted that they named a once wholesome fruit flavor after the epitome of all that is noisome, barefoot and dirty, Cherry Garcia.… Read the rest

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Black Metal: Evolution of the Cult

FRONT COVER FINAL_printBlack metal is fast, loud, theatrical, angry, and murderous — both musically and in the scene that surrounds it.

If you dig Black Metal, or if you like to read about things odd and dark, check out Black Metal: Evolution of the Cult by Dayal Patterson. Patterson is an expert on the scene and is the man behind Cult Never Dies. You can check out his store here.

My interview with him is below.

For the uninitiated, what constitutes Black Metal?

Well that’s a question that I’ve been exploring over two full-length books – not least because there is a lot of disagreement about its definition within the scene. So that’s a tough question! What is fairly safe to say is that black metal is one of the most extreme, ambitious, and varied forms of heavy metal… and one might argue contemporary music in general. It was born in the early eighties but reinvented itself around 1990/1991 and has continued to explode in terms of activity and popularity since then, with bands and scenes existing in almost every territory you could care to mention.Read the rest

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