Archive | Art

The Twisted Art by Zdzisław Beksiński

h/t Reddit. via Wikipedia:
Zdzisław Beksiński (24 February 1929 – 21 February 2005) was a Polish painter, photographer and sculptor, specializing in the field of utopian art. Beksiński did his paintings and drawings in what he called either a 'Baroque' or a 'Gothic' manner. His creations were made mainly in two periods. The first period of work is generally considered to contain expressionistic color, with a strong style of "utopian realism" and surreal architecture, like a doomsday scenario. The second period contained more abstract style, with the main features of formalism. Beksiński was murdered in 2005.
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DIGITAL ADDICTION | Imitate Modern Gallery

RHK1Having just returned to London from painting his largest architectural scale installation to date, the exterior of a massive 5 story, 10k square foot food bank in Lower Silesia – Poland, RSH announces the release his limited edition print DIGITAL ADDICTION via London’s Imitate Modern Gallery.“Digital Addiction” is a powerful abstract metaform built from composite layers of paintings/3D modelling/html5 panorama/and collage to create an extraordinary print of light and depth that thematically considers society’s 21st century addiction to digital imagery and its continual manipulation.

A 5 colour silk screened, 3 colour ways print in an edition of 33 each on 400 gsm heavy Bristol paper with metallic ink overlays in each of copper, gold, and silver editions. The print image is 24×24 inches on a 32×32 inch sized paper.

“At all levels, ultimately graffiti is an act of cultural insurgency. It is a rebellion; against the norm, against society at large, against corporations, against the city or “government.” Graffiti is the act of changing the visual environment in the public space.
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The Freaks, Madmen, and Monsters of Thomas Kuebler

Thomas Kuebler, an Ohio sculptor, creates stunningly life-like silicone sculptures.
"There are high-detail life sculptors out there who provide an awesome caliber of realism; sculpture so life-like that even under the closest scrutiny you expect it to move. This kind of art requires the mastery of many mediums, and while I strive to achieve that mastery, realism is secondary to the focus of the work. I want to tell wild stories in a single three-dimensional portrait and literally flesh out a biography with hair, clothing, trinkets, teeth and fingernails, etc. To me, what is most important is to create "the character" first and foremost, because all of the special effects in the world can't save you if you start with a lousy script." - Tom Kuebler
Check out his website here.

Nosferatu

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The Immortal Ed Wood

Ed WoodContinuing our string of spooky October posts, this month we celebrate the birthday of filmmaker Ed Wood who was born on October 10, 1924. Wood passed away prematurely at the age of 54 due to a heart attack. During his short life, he made a series of science fiction and monster films that weren’t so much scary as they were scary-bad.

Wood also challenged social taboos like transgenderism way back in 1953 with his first film Glen or Glenda which was based on the life Christine Jorgensen and Wood’s own predilections for transvestism — if Wood’s monster movies failed to spook his sympathetic treatment of LGBT issues at the dawn of the Eisenhower Era it would have been a true shocker.

Wood’s camp aesthetics have garnered him a cult following, but here at Insomnia we love Wood because he was a true Hollywood dreamer who imagined himself to be an immortal filmmaker before actually becoming one.… Read the rest

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David Cronenberg: Why Frustrated Novelists Hate the Screenplay

"David Cronenberg at BMC Lab in TIFF Bell Lightbox" by Canadian Film Centre via Flickr. (CC by 2.0)

“David Cronenberg at BMC Lab in TIFF Bell Lightbox” by Canadian Film Centre via Flickr. (CC by 2.0)

via The Daily Beast [click through to read the entire interview]:

“I couldn’t have written this novel without the Internet,” the film director David Cronenberg says about Consumed, sounding like one of the obsessed characters lifted from its pages.

Published late last month by Scribner, the book details the bifurcated narratives of a romantically and technologically linked journalist couple, one chasing the story of the grisly and cannibalistic murder involving a famous French philosophy couple and their acolytes, the other a relationship between the doctor behind a mysterious sexually transmitted disease and his strange daughter. In between, the novel features many detours: the Cannes Film Festival, 3-D printing, hooked penises, and transmissions from the “insect kingdom” through fake hearing aids. It’s the most Cronenbergian thing you’ll ever experience, and a little awkward to read on the subway.

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Pursuing Justice Through Filmmaking, Why we Create Beauty, Hot Dog Related Altercations

Via Midwest Real

Filmmakers Spencer Chumbley and Erik Ljung have shot for organizations like VICE and Al Jazeera. I caught up with the guys just before they debuted their film, The Death of Cory Stingley a the Milwaukee Film Festival. 

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Humans make things, we always have. But, we don’t just make, we create beauty. We pay attention to symmetry, form and detail. Why is that? Darwinian theory says it’s simply a form of “peacocking.” More specifically, our creative predispositions are merely “fitness signals.” For example, if you write a novel, create a moving peace of art, or compose a great song, it’s just a uniquely human way of showing off your intellect in hopes of attracting a mate, like a peacock with it’s innately douchey bouquet of feathers.

I fucking hate this idea.  

But, let’s be fair. It’s totally undeniable that ego and social elevation are often intertwined with creative accomplishments.Read the rest

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