Archive | Art

“How to Build a Universe That Doesn’t Fall Apart Two Days Later” by Philip K. Dick, 1978

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Philip k dick drawing” by Pete Welsch from Washington, DC, USA – Philip K Dick. Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons.

 

Via Deoxy.org

by Philip K. Dick 1978

First, before I begin to bore you with the usual sort of things science fiction writers say in speeches, let me bring you official greetings from Disneyland. I consider myself a spokesperson for Disneyland because I live just a few miles from it—and, as if that were not enough, I once had the honor of being interviewed there by Paris TV.

For several weeks after the interview, I was really ill and confined to bed. I think it was the whirling teacups that did it. Elizabeth Antebi, who was the producer of the film, wanted to have me whirling around in one of the giant teacups while discussing the rise of fascism with Norman Spinrad… an old friend of mine who writes excellent science fiction.… Read the rest

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Psycho: Up Close


Psycho: Up Close from Roman Holiday on Vimeo.

Here we are on week 2 of the new “Up Close” montage series. Today’s film choice is Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho (1960). Ol’ Hitch certainly knew how to shoot some gorgeous close-ups.

I’d like to give a quick shout out to Psycho II and Psycho III which I’ve recently viewed and quite enjoyed. Even though the sequels came in over 20 years after the original they all come together in a pretty nice trilogy. Word’s still out on Psycho IV: The Beginning. Haven’t quite sought that one out yet.

Music: The Body – Bernard Herrmann (from the Original Motion Picture Soundtrack)

 

h/t Laughing Squid.

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Performance, Capture Technology, Ritualistic Animation, and Hologram Musings

“It is only by working the rituals, that any significant degree of understanding can develop. If you wait until you are positive you understand all aspects of the ceremony before beginning to work, you will never begin to work.”

Lon Milo DuQuette


This story begins with a really strange moment from my childhood, that somehow is connected to all of this, a spark that bounced off into the distance from when I can hardly remember. At about the age of 5, I saw Toy Story in theaters. I had seen many animated feature films before this one, but for some reason, a peculiar feeling came over me. After seeing that movie and going home, I asked my parents about animation. I somehow knew, after discussing it with them, that I would be making animation, in Georgia of all places. I remember asking them where Georgia was—it was all pretty weird to say the least. It was odd, even at that young age, to imagine doing something for a living in a place I hadn’t really heard of or knew anything about.… Read the rest

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Google Puts Online 10,000 Works of Street Art from Across the Globe

Circling Birdies by Cheko, Granada Spain

Circling Birdies by Cheko, Granada Spain

Ayun Halliday via Open Culture:

Since last we wrote, Google Street Art has doubled its online archive by adding some 5,000 images, bringing the tally to 10,000, with coordinates pinpointing exact locations on all five continents (though as of this writing, things are a bit thin on the ground in Africa). Given the temporal realities of outdoor, guerrilla art, pilgrims may arrive to find a blank canvas where graffiti once flourished. (RIP New York City’s 5 Pointz, the “Institute of Higher Burning.”)

A major aim of the project is virtual preservation. As with performance art, documentation is key. Not all of the work can be attributed, but click on an image to see what is known. Guided tours to neighborhoods rich with street art allow armchair travelers to experience the work, and interviews with the artists dispel any number of stereotypes.

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First and Final Frames


First and Final Frames from Jacob T. Swinney on Vimeo.

What can we learn by examining only the first and final shot of a film? This video plays the opening and closing shots of 55 films side-by-side. Some of the opening shots are strikingly similar to the final shots, while others are vastly different–both serving a purpose in communicating various themes. Some show progress, some show decline, and some are simply impactful images used to begin and end a film.

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Nimoy’s Kabbalistic Photography

Photo by Leonard Nimoy

Photo by Leonard Nimoy

It was sad to lose Leonard Nimoy, but it’s wonderful to look back on the man’s productive creative life and feel gratitude for his gifts. An interesting point of focus in many of the remembrances I’ve seen is Nimoy’s work as a photographer. Some of Nimoy’s photographs connect directly to his spiritual life, but so does the character of Spock. Nimoy’s photos aren’t as well known as his acting, but the fact is that whether he was on a television screen, in front of a movie camera or working behind the lens to create his own still images, Nimoy was a mystic who grounded his creativity in the sky. Here’s what art critic and poet Donald Kuspit had to say about Nimoy’s and his art…

Nimoy is a gnostic mystic—a radical spiritualist, indeed, a spiritual rebel…I am suggesting that Nimoy’s fascination with the female body involves an element of temptation as well as transcendence.Read the rest

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Jodorowsky Gets Kickstarter Green-Light

Jodo Young

Over the weekend, Alejandro Jodorowsky’s recent Kickstarter campaign made its goal of $300,000 and was closing in on $385,000 with three days to go at the time of this posting. It looks to me like it might end up just beyond the $400,000 mark.

My girlfriend and I supported the campaign to make Endless Poetry a reality, and I’ve been posting to the film’s poetry archive via Twitter. I don’t write poetry as often as I do critical writing, songwriting, blogging etc. I usually feel moved to actually practice poetry with more attention in the fall, but this year that didn’t really happen.

I’m really happy that this Jodorowsky archive has popped up as its given me a framework and a set of rules for writing poems and I’ve found it to be completely engaging. People think writer’s block denotes a lack of ideas, but, in fact it’s usually an abundance of ideas that stops the process, and it’s often limits and lacking that finally stoke the fires again.… Read the rest

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Roerich and Tibet: The Road to Shambhala Can Take Some Very Surprising Turns 

N Roerich.jpg

Nicholas Roerich

In the fall of 1923, a peculiar sage-looking European appeared in Darjeeling in the northernmost part of India near the Tibetan border. A plump man with a round face and a small Mongol-styled beard, he moved and talked like a high dignitary. He announced that he was a painter, and, indeed, from time to time people could see him here and there with a sketchbook, drawing local landscapes.

Yet, even for an eccentric painter, he acted strangely. To begin with, he argued that he was an American, although he spoke English with a heavy Slavic accent. He also demonstrated a deep interest in Tibetan Buddhism, particularly in the Maitreya and Shambhala legends, which was not unusual—except that the painter had a ceremonial Dalai Lama robe made for himself and donned it occasionally, hinting he was the reincarnated fifth Dalai Lama, the famous reformer in early modern Tibet. His behavior raised the eyebrows of local authorities who passed this information along to the British intelligence service.… Read the rest

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The Art World’s Descent into Irrelevance and Degeneracy

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Cainus Maxus writes at Alternative Right:

Today’s Art world is so far gone, so lacking in any substance, even anything naive and amusingly humanistic, that it befuddles any average person with a working sense of reality. The irony of all this is that Art is dominated by the Far Left, and the Far Left claim to idolize the working man – at least around outsiders. Instead they succeed only in alienating him, and this is no surprise because artists don’t really care about average people – but like everything else in society, they must adopt the veneer of militant humanism.

Ludicrously priced junk goes for obscene amounts, and the average working man shakes his head because he feels he’s being fooled. While he bleeds from his hands, hammering in steel at the job site, or biting his lip when his boss is verbally reaming him, he wonders how those pampered artists, with their 10 dollar soy mocha lattes are enjoying the day duct-taping a blow up doll to a chair and dumping paint on it as an expression of “feminine rage” against the always present “patriarchy.”

The politics of the art world claim to have the common man’s best interests at heart – always vying for socialism, for the working class, “Equality,” “Freedom” – but he knows they don’t really care.

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