Archive | Education

Southpaw kid is Totally Metal according to teacher

In this day and age of advanced science and technology, it is always shocking to hear an alleged educator spewing idiotic medieval nonsense.

But when has that ever stopped anyone? You guessed it, never.

Since I’m clearly a cock-eyed optimist I say: when life hands you lemons make some badass totally metal lemonade.

'nuff said. \m/(x1x)\m/

’nuff said. \m/(x1x)\m/

According to Anything Left Handed this kid is now The Most Metal Kid in School:

We had an email recently from Club Member Mary that rather shocked us.  She said…

“I am very disturbed by a news report of a 4 year old being forced to write with his right hand.  This thought process is archaic.

Here is a link about a 4 year old being forced to write with his right hand.

Be outraged for this child.  I guess some Oklahoma educators are still using 1815 methods regarding left-handed people.  Hopefully, this will not cause him to have academic problems. 

Read the rest
Continue Reading

‘Citizen Kane’ to ‘Call of Duty’: The rise of video games in universities


Dead Bug Creek, Ashley Pinnick’s final project

Jessica Conditt via engadget:

Picture an art school. Visualize the hallways of a university dedicated to the arts, the classrooms lined with paint tubes, charcoal sticks and nude models. Imagine the galleries where outgoing seniors present their final projects. Consider the thick-framed glasses that sit atop students’ noses as they sketch, sculpt, write and design the things that lurk in their wildest daydreams. Now picture a creation so strange that the school’s professors aren’t sure how to critique it from an artistic angle, let alone how to assign it a grade.

In Pasadena, California, Art Center College of Design graduate Ashley Pinnick faced this problem in her last semester, with her final project: a video game.

Specifically, Pinnick’s project was a quirky exploration game for Oculus’ VR headset called Dead Bug Creek. It was wildly different from her peers’ creations in the Illustration degree program, but not because it was more experimental or nonsensical: It was the only video game on display because Art Center didn’t have a technical video game development program.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

Donald Trump and the Ghosts of Totalitarianism

Donald Trump
Henry Giroux writes at CounterPunch:

In the current historical moment in the United States, the emptying out of language is nourished by the assault on the civic imagination. One example of this can be found in the rise of Donald Trump on the political scene. Donald Trump’s popular appeal speaks to not just the boldness of what he says and the shock it provokes, but the inability to respond to shock with informed judgement rather than titillation. Marie Luise Knott is right in noting that “We live our lives with the help of the concepts we form of the world. They enable an author to make the transition from shock to observation to finally creating space for action—for writing and speaking. Just as laws guarantee a public space for political action, conceptual thought ensures the existence of the four walls within which judgment operates.”[1] The concepts that now guide our understanding of American society are dominated by a corporate induced linguistic and authoritarian model that brings ruin to language, politics and democracy itself.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

Beyond Words: Manly P. Hall Teaches You How to Read

“A mind needs books as a sword needs a whetstone, if it is to keep its edge.” Tyrion Lannister

Ever wish you could get the most out of the material you read? From articles to books to academic papers to opinion pieces, there is a sea of old and new information out there (more like an overwhelming tsunami of it) that’s not only become increasingly difficult to keep up with and sift through, but to comprehend in the first place. In this lecture (“Mind and the Book“), Manly P. Hall doesn’t offer a “one weird trick” shortcut, but a deeply involved, integrative, and discerning discipline. It’s genuinely some of the best advice on reading (including its foundational importance and principles) that I’ve ever come across – and he puts it in such shatteringly obvious and crystallizing terms that the toolkit he provides will be sure to stick with you regardless of what you may read (and how “hard” it may be to understand).… Read the rest

Continue Reading

Why We Should Fear University, Inc.

Just like government, university education has been taken over by corporatism. Fredrik deBoer makes a case “Against the corporate taming of the American college” at the New York Times Magazine:

Here at Purdue University, where I recently completed my Ph.D. in English, we have a little garden on the far west side of our enormous campus, where students and their families and professors and nearby residents tend to tomatoes and sunflowers. It’s one of my favorite places here. Overgrown and seemingly unmanaged, this western fringe of campus is perhaps the only place left at the university that is not meticulously landscaped and stage-managed for tour groups and the website. There’s nothing specific to Purdue in this aesthetic conformity. Over the past two decades, financial crises notwithstanding, the American university writ large has undergone a radical physical expansion and renovation, bringing more and more campuses into line with grand architectural visions.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

Children in Some Communities Have Higher Rates of PTSD than Veterans

india sad
Emily Watson writes at Alternet:

In his 22 years of teaching high school English to East Oakland’s teenagers, Jeff Duncan-Andrade has witnessed kids and their families struggle through all kinds of trauma. He has seen how the constant, unrelenting stress – what researchers are now calling toxic stress – that comes from housing, employment and food insecurity, as well as continued violence in the neighborhood, visits a punishing impact on students and how they learn.

These experiences led Duncan-Andrade, some years ago, to begin looking for ways to better support students and their families — to show students they were valuable members of a community and worthy beyond their test scores. Buoyed by the belief that it is essential to provide kids with the most basic supports (food, shelter, safety) before they can learn, in early August Duncan-Andrade opened the doors of the Roses in Concrete Community School, incorporating his philosophy of involving parents and families to lift up the whole community.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

Terence McKenna Had a Bad Trip in the Late 80’s and Never Took Mushrooms Again

Terence_cosmo-codeAll I can say is wow, and of course the way I stumbled upon this fun little nugget of information had to do with listening to synchronous inner wisdom. So a couple weeks back I had a dream where it felt like I was watching a film about Terence’s final days. The details aren’t super relevant here, but what’s compelling is that at one point, my mind-camera focused in on his face and you could see it in him. The mushrooms killed him. He’d gone way too far on that front, and somehow, in this alternate dream world, this was evident to me solely from his appearance. I picked up on it immediately and it was the main thing I took away from the dream. Anyway, I posted this on Facebook (like my new page if you want to see this sort of shit in your feed), and one of my fans pointed out to me that Terence did in fact stop taking mushrooms nearly 12 years before he died because of a horrifying trip.… Read the rest

Continue Reading

How to Get a Bad Cop Fired

Matt Agorist writes at the Free Thought Project:

While police brutality may seem overwhelming at times, it is important to remember that brutal police are the few and those of us who want peace are the many.

It is also important to remember that police work for the many. 

Matthew Cooke is an Oscar-nominated documentary film producer, who has since turned to making powerful and hard-hitting minifilms about the police state.

More here.

Read the rest

Continue Reading

Reform Higher Ed? Treat Badmin Like Bankers

college lecture
David Mihalyfy argues that in order to reform higher education, America should focus on “higher ed’s pre-modern governance system, which lacks transparency and accountability and thus easily permits diversion of funds by ‘badmin’, as institutional guardians with the wrong values have been evocatively called.”

via CounterPunch:

Culture oddly normalizes everything, including the legal oligarchies hijacking our universities and harming our country. The bolded terms of our schools’ civics textbooks laud our government’s system of checks-and-balances and ultimate citizen control, from division of powers and the bicameral legislature all the way through the increasing enfranchisement of Women’s Suffrage and the Civil Rights Act.

Our universities, however, little resemble our properly praised although sometimes frustrating form of government. Instead, university authorities are “beholden to none“, as the American Council of Trustees and Alumni declares; customarily, trustees are either self-appointing or politically appointed, and thus everyone from funders and beneficiaries to frontline mission fulfillers exert virtually no real formal control.

Read the rest
Continue Reading