Archive | Education

Performance, Capture Technology, Ritualistic Animation, and Hologram Musings

“It is only by working the rituals, that any significant degree of understanding can develop. If you wait until you are positive you understand all aspects of the ceremony before beginning to work, you will never begin to work.”

Lon Milo DuQuette


This story begins with a really strange moment from my childhood, that somehow is connected to all of this, a spark that bounced off into the distance from when I can hardly remember. At about the age of 5, I saw Toy Story in theaters. I had seen many animated feature films before this one, but for some reason, a peculiar feeling came over me. After seeing that movie and going home, I asked my parents about animation. I somehow knew, after discussing it with them, that I would be making animation, in Georgia of all places. I remember asking them where Georgia was—it was all pretty weird to say the least. It was odd, even at that young age, to imagine doing something for a living in a place I hadn’t really heard of or knew anything about.… Read the rest

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“Zero Tolerance” Policies in Schools Are Not the Answer

Marie (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Marie (CC BY-SA 2.0)

“Zero Tolerance,” modeled after the “broken windows” theory, has become common place in American school districts. Different infractions of varying degrees: possessing a weapon, smoking a cigarette in the bathroom, continual tardiness, and “willful defiance,” can result in suspension. These policies began to take hold during the Bloomberg years in high-poverty, urban school systems. Of course, this harsh attitude leads to higher suspension rates, which puts students at risk of “failing a grade, dropping out, or becoming incarcerated.”

Nonetheless, some school districts are wising up to the failures of zero tolerance policing. The suspension rate for LA schools fell by 53% after they banned suspensions “for subjective offenses such as ‘willful defiance.'” In contrast, LA graduation rates rose by 12%.

Carly Berwick at The Atlantic writes:

It turns out that there are plenty of options, and that’s where progressive education steps in. Indeed, many of these options hark back to the era of early 20th-century schooling, when educators pushed back against the teaching philosophies typical of the 1800s: an emphasis on rote memorization and physical obedience, for one.

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Could Psilocybin Be the Next Caffeine? A Microdosing Report.

darksideofthesun3Well, this is an odd one. Typically if you were going to read an article of mine about psychedelics, it’d be about telepathic communication with higher dimensional forms of insectile intelligence or plants or some shit (which I continually pontificate about on Facebook, friend me). That’s just sort of how I roll and, as a matter of fact, I just participated in a research study for John Hopkins University in regards to that exact topic. So it’s not sounding so crazy anymore, is it? But, as with most bizzarro endeavors I find myself engaged in, I am but a talking monkey guided by means of mostly unseen synchromystic entanglement.

Last fall, I tossed up a post about the Hypnotikon psychedelic music festival in Seattle. After writing about it, I thought to myself, “hmmm, maybe I should try microdosing for this thing.” It’s something I’d read about, but hadn’t truly considered experimenting with a whole lot before then.… Read the rest

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‘Teach philosophy in primary schools,’ says academic

Hartwig HKD (CC BY-ND 2.0)

Hartwig HKD (CC BY-ND 2.0)

I wholeheartedly agree with this.

Naomi Ackerman writes at The Guardian:

“If we leave questioning the models children have been taught until later in life, it could be too late,” warns Professor Angie Hobbs. “That is why we need to start teaching philosophy in primary school.”

By this the professor means that children should be taught from a young age that there are other ways of seeing the world to the one they are exposed to by their family and social circle.

It’s a pertinent and timely point to make, especially considering the current debate around the risk of ‘radicalisation’ facing young people.

Hobbs is currently the only professor of public understanding of philosophy in the world. She believes that just one philosophy class a week could benefit children’s intellectual and social development.

Her department at the University of Sheffield – along with organisations such as The Philosophy Foundation – are currently pioneering the teaching of ancient Greek philosophy in UK primary schools.

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Sexuality & Power

CroppedImage400225-Veronique-Mottier

What is normal sex? Who decides? Why has power dominated pleasure in the history of sexuality? From the pederasty of the ancient Greeks to radical feminists in the 2oth century, sex has always been a reflection of the struggle for power in society. In ‘Sexuality & Power‘, Professor Véronique Mottier unveils the truth of what goes on behind closed doors in this free online course from IAI.tv.

The details of the course can be found here – or see the whole list of IAI Academy courses here.

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Altered States and Paranormal Narratives with Jeffrey J. Kripal

Like most readers, fellow Disinformation contributor Jeremy J. Johnson and I are both big fans of author Dr. Jeffrey J. Kripal (Mutants & Mystics and Authors of the Impossible: The Paranormal and the Sacred).
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We caught up with him recently to discuss Philip K. Dick’s precognition abilities, global shamanic culture, synchronicity, and a new documentary Supernature that he has in the works.

JJ/BR: Dr. Kripal, it is an honor to speak with you. Graham Hancock, Rak Razam, Jeremy D. Johnson and I have recently come up with the concept of entheodelic storytelling. It signifies the archaic revival narrative and gives definition to a new movement of art that is influenced by the usual subjects; altered states, the evolution of consciousness, entheogens, occultism, paranormal phenomena, shamanism, and metaphysics. This also seems to be entangled with what our friend Rak has called the “global shamanic resurgence.” 

In recent mainstream media we have seen a more positive view of entheogens as psychedelic medicines slowly infiltrate the mainstream.Read the rest

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The Book of the Law & the Gnostic Concept of the Holy Trinity

darksideofthesun1If you’ll recall, about a month ago I read Gary Lachman’s new book about Aleister Crowley (totally worth checking out) and ranted off about how I personally can’t stand the self-proclaimed Great Beast. But I must confess that my motivations for being that snarkingly harsh were quite similar to why I was such a Christianity-hating, angry, metal dude in my late teens and early twenties (it was the 90’s after all). I grew up believing in the church. When I got older, I started contemplating it a bit more and realized that I literally couldn’t go all-in believing in dogmas. I was pissed. This happened to me quite some time ago with Crowley, but dealing with dicks on the internet, the sorry state of the modern Occult, and reading Lachman’s book rekindled the fire.

In the course of all this, something quite interesting did go down, though. While bored at work one day, I pulled up a PDF of The Book of the Law, which I hadn’t read in about 6 years.… Read the rest

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Four Reasons Young Americans Should Burn Their Student Loan Papers

'Fifty years ago students burned their draft cards to protest an immoral war against the people of Vietnam. Today it's a different kind of war, immoral in another way, waged against young Americans of approximately the same age, and threatening them in a manner that endangers not their lives but their livelihoods.' (Photo: Wikimedia Commons)

‘Fifty years ago students burned their draft cards to protest an immoral war against the people of Vietnam. Today it’s a different kind of war, immoral in another way, waged against young Americans of approximately the same age, and threatening them in a manner that endangers not their lives but their livelihoods.’ (Photo: Wikimedia Commons)

Paul Buchheit writes at Common Dreams:

‘Hell No, We Won’t Go’ — 1967
‘No Way, We Won’t Pay’ — 2015

Fifty years ago students burned their draft cards to protest an immoral war against the people of Vietnam. Today it’s a different kind of war, immoral in another way, waged against young Americans of approximately the same age, and threatening them in a manner that endangers not their lives but their livelihoods.

There are at least four good reasons why America’s young adults— and their parents—should take up the fight against financial firms who are holding high-interest student loans that total more than the nation’s credit card debt, and more than the total income of the poorer half of America.

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