Archive | Education

Sustainable Psychedelics: Cultivating a Viable Relationship with the Medicine

Moderator dreamer042 of the DMT-Nexus elaborates on more sustainable approaches to utilizing psychedelics:

As the global demand for entheogenic medicines 1grows, we are seeing a simultaneous rise in unsustainable harvesting, poaching, and related ecological damage. The question we, as responsible explorers of expanded consciousness, should be asking is, “What are the hidden costs associated with my personal path of healing through medicine work?” From the cultural and environmental impact of the ever-growing ayahuasca tourism industry in the Amazon, to the ripping up of mature mimosa trees for their root bark in Brazil, to the stripping of protected acacia trees in Australia, to the poaching of iboga to near extinction in Africa, to the destruction of what remains of the ever shrinking North American peyote habitat. It’s time for a radical shift in the way we relate to these sacred plant teachers.

You will often hear people endlessly expounding on the idea that you should never drink ayahuasca without a shaman or that the only way to have an authentic experience is to jet-set halfway around the world and attend a ceremony in Peru or Gabon.… Read the rest

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“Broken Windows” Policing in the Classroom

“Women’s School Jail.” Library of Congress

“Women’s School Jail.” Library of Congress

via Jacobin:

When police grappled Eric Garner into a chokehold and left him to die in the street on July 17, it wasn’t just one Staten Island cop that incited protest. The entire ”broken windows” system of policing was again thrown into question – particularly because its architect, Police Commissioner Bill Bratton, had been reappointed to a second term just seven months earlier by Mayor Bill de Blasio.

Perhaps less known is the fact that the “broken windows” theory has crept into classrooms in New York City and across the nation.

As the policing theory goes, minor instances of supposed disorder — spraying graffiti, panhandling, selling single cigarettes – creates an environment of lawlessness, leading to acts of theft and murder. Busting jaywalkers and homeless people for misdemeanors, it follows, will decrease the homicide rate. Some of the fastest-growing charter school networks explicitly draw on Bratton’s law enforcement methods to run their schools, which typically enroll mostly black and brown students.

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Noam Chomsky on Education and Indoctrination

By Kris Arnold via Flickr (cc by 2.0)

By Kris Arnold via Flickr (cc by 2.0)

via AlterNet [Click through to read the entire interview]:

History teacher Dan Falcone and English teacher Saul Isaacson spoke with Noam Chomsky in his Cambridge office on September 16, 2014, about education and indoctrination, the 1960s, the Powell memorandum, democracy, the creation of ISIS, the media and the way “capitalism” actually works in the United States.

Dan Falcone: We’re in Cambridge, Massachusetts, with Professor Noam Chomsky. I am Dan Falcone with Saul Isaacson, and this is actually the third time I’ve visited you. So I wanted to thank you for that. And since I am a teacher, I wanted to start off by continuing on the themes of democracy and education.

I have noticed students making very insightful and uplifting observations in the midst of chaos. For example, they noticed that support for Israel fell out of favor in certain mainstream circles, and that the recent police treatment of unarmed black teenagers in intensifying areas of violence is a crucial matter of concern.

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Magick is All in My Head? Think Again!

sacredsigilsservitor3Okay, so you’re probably getting bored with hearing about my book (The Galactic Dialogue: Occult Initiations, out now!) at this point, so this will be the second to last in my five part series (symbolizing the five sides of the pentagram) of posts on it. Of course last week if you were watching you heard me rant about my “Summoning my Holy Guardian Angel/Alien Contact” experience, but that is only one of many ultra-strange tales contained in the living book’s pages. This might be the strangest. It’s funny but when critics tell me that magick is crazy, I say “exactly.” When they say that it’s just my imagination, I say “precisely the point.” Materialist science still hasn’t explained what the hell is going on with things like schizophrenia. (Why do nearly all schizophrenics see daemons?) Furthermore, the boundaries of the human imagination have yet to be explored or defined.

But when critics say that it’s all in my head I have to resoundingly say, well, no.… Read the rest

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Columbus Day and the Sanitization of History

851px-Christopher_Columbus

The strife that has engulfed Christopher Columbus’s legacy in recent years has put the concept of an Indigenous People’s Day at the forefront of discussion.

In theory, as we move forward in our lives, we should make every effort to broaden our perspective and to seek out the truth. As we mature so should our thought process. Such maturation holds true on both an individual and a societal basis. A broad understanding of history enables one to reconcile the past, comprehend the present, and reasonably theorize how future events may unfold. As truths are discovered, norms begin to shift. Such forthright thinking is necessary to fully grasp the complexities of historical events and figures. This is particularly true with respect to the legacy of Christopher Columbus. A polarizing historical figure whose life has been defined, by many, for his astonishing level of courage and intestinal fortitude; nevertheless, such impressive traits should never blur the fact that he oversaw a murderous quest for material riches that resulted in the utter demise of a people.… Read the rest

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Schools Need to Learn the Importance of Recess

By Bruce McKay via Flickr (CC by 2.0)

By Bruce McKay via Flickr (CC by 2.0)

Jesse Hagopian writes at the Seattle Times:

MY 5-year-old is bursting at the seams with excitement with the start of kindergarten this year. He tells me he wants to learn to tell time, tie his shoes, learn a new language, play basketball and make new friends. He attends an increasingly rare school that allows a decent amount of time for recess — something research has shown supports academics, healthy friendships and healthy bodies.

The average time Seattle students spend in recess has steadily declined over the past few years, according to a May KUOW investigative story. When the study tracking recess began four years ago, only one Seattle school reported an average recess time of 20 minutes or less per day. During the 2013-2014 school year, some 11 schools offered that sort of a recess.

What’s worse, the schools with the shortest recess times enroll disproportionately more low-income students and students of color.

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Psychoactive Sermon #1: The Occult and Alien Contact

Just a reminder that there are roughly 20 autographed copies of The Galactic Dialogue left and when they’re gone, they’re gone. Suggested donation of $11, $21 extra for overseas shipping unfortunately.

Also available for way cheaper overseas through Amazon and only $2.99 digital.

@Thad_McKraken for the Tweedle dee deets

(Constant magick journal weirdness on Facebook, friend me)

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Op-ed: The Plot Against Public Education

By Detlef Schobert via Flickr (CC by 2.0)

By Detlef Schobert via Flickr (CC by 2.0)

via Politico Magazine:

Bill Gates had an idea. He was passionate about it, absolutely sure he had a winner. His idea? America’s high schools were too big.

When a multibillionaire gets an idea, just about everybody leans in to listen. And when that idea has to do with matters of important public policy and the billionaire is willing to back it up with hard cash, public officials tend to reach for the money with one hand and their marching orders with the other. Gates backed his small-schools initiative with enormous amounts of cash. So, without a great deal of thought, one school district after another signed on to the notion that large public high schools should be broken up and new, smaller schools should be created.

This was an inherently messy process. The smaller schools—proponents sometimes called them academies—would often be shoehorned into the premises of the larger schools, so you’d end up with two, three or more schools competing for space and resources in one building.

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