Archive | Education

Join the Making of Online Courses With Some Dangerous Minds

As previously posted on Disinfo, The Institute of Art and Ideas have started an educational platform called IAI Academy with free online courses from world-leading scholars on the ideas that matter.

The physical version of the IAI Academy, where the courses are filmed in front of a live audience, takes place at the HowTheLightGetsIn festival for philosophy and music. This year’s version runs from 21st to 31st May in Hay-on-Wye in Wales and will add Academy courses on everything from how culture affects mental illness with the president of the World Psychiatric Association Dinesh Bhugra to how AI will change our societies by the Data Editor of the Economist Kenneth Cukier.

All courses from last year’s Academy can be found here, and the full programme for this year’s festival courses here. The festival itself is 11 days of big thinking and music with over 200 world-leading speakers including Lawrence Krauss, Roger Penrose and Paul Krugman, and 270 artists such as Lianne la Havas, Mike Skinner and Rae Morris.… Read the rest

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As Above, So Below: True Meaning of The Cross With Crichton Miller

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“We are on firmer ground when we reflect on how our ancestors used the stars — for timekeeping, calendar-making, and navigation at sea.”
The History of Astronomy by Heather Couper and Nigel Henbest, p.8

The Golden Thread of Time by Crichton E. M. Miller traces the history of the cross from Paleolithic and Neolithic hunter-gatherers to stone age seafarers and megalith masons. He argues that the cross was not merely a religious symbol, but a device used to measure time, navigate, make astronomical observations, and create architecture. He first came to this realization when attempting to discover an ancient theodolite capable of accuracy to 3 minutes of arc in order to measure the pyramids of Giza. He suddenly found himself kneeling before such a device in the form of a cross. It was this discovery, or rediscovery, that initiated his journey to understand the true meaning and history of the cross.

“How did the cross originate?” I asked.… Read the rest

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Carlos Castaneda: The Trickster Sorcerer

Thrift Store FindsI took the above picture after a rather fruitful day at the thrift store a few weeks back. No really, I found a copy of The Disinformation Book of Lists, a hard cover copy of The Art of Dreaming by Carlos Castaneda, and a VHS copy of Harvey all on the same morning. Sometimes everything just comes together. I posted the picture on Facebook (friend me). Of course, I’m only mentioning it here because of the synchromystic hive-mind interconnectivity shit that went down right afterwards. So, someone comments on the picture in regards to Castaneda, which was the second time he had come up in the same week. The first time was in relation to a wizard battle dream I had, where I fought off fledgling spectral witches inside my psychic mind temple. I don’t even pretend to entirely understand this stuff, but because it came up once again, I briefly mentioned how Castaneda was essentially a fiction author and a rather fucked up dude at that.… Read the rest

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Middle schoolers: Uncle Sam wants you

August Say, 12, holds out his arm to determine where he should stand in class in the new Dragon Leadership Corps at his middle school in Bowling Green, Ohio.

August Say, 12, holds out his arm to determine where he should stand in class in the new Dragon Leadership Corps at his middle school in Bowling Green, Ohio.

Seth Kershner via In These Times:

Last year, Henry F. Moss Middle School in Bowling Green, Ohio, offered students a brand new course. And, as a headline in the local newspaper proclaimed, this was “not your traditional class.” For starters, the teacher—an army sergeant—had told the Bowling Green Daily News that one of his goals was to expose these seventh- and eighth-graders to “military values” that they could use as “building blocks” in life. To that end, students in the class earn military style ranks, engage in army-style “PT” (physical training) and each Wednesday, wear camouflage pants and boots.

This is the Moss Middle School Leadership Corps, part of the growing trend of military-style education for pre-adolescents.

Middle school military programs are younger cousins of the Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (JROTC), a Pentagon program taught by retired military officers and present in more than 3,500 high schools nationwide.

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The Thousand Eyed God Within & The Regenerative Power of Insectile Telepathy

alex grey eyesIf you’re familiar with my writing at all, then you’re probably aware that everything in my life is guided by the hidden hand of a synchronous collusion with the unseen. On that front, a couple of weeks ago, I tossed up a new series of art. I was later informed in an intuitive informational download from beyond that the images I conjured forth had to do with a psilocybin encounter that went down on my birthday back in 2010. (I write about this Occult meditational shit on FB all the time, feel free to friend me.) As a matter of fact, I talked about that particular entheogen transmission in my latest book (another one on the way soon). Because of that, I was planning on doing a post about how extravagantly peculiar this all is. However, in going back and reviewing the entire passage, I remembered, oh yeah, wait, that whole ritualistic encounter was partially induced by my unintended exposure to Alex Grey’s art the night before.… Read the rest

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A Report From Occupied Territory — James Baldwin

"James Baldwin Allan Warren" by Allan warren - Own work. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:James_Baldwin_Allan_Warren.jpg#/media/File:James_Baldwin_Allan_Warren.jpg

“James Baldwin Allan Warren” by Allan warren – Own work. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons

Still eerily relevant 49 years later…

James Baldwin via The Nation:

July 11, 1966

On April 17, 1964, in Harlem, New York City, a young salesman, father of two, left a customer’s apartment and went into the streets. There was a great commotion in the streets, which, especially since it was a spring day, involved many people, including running, frightened, little boys. They were running from the police. Other people, in windows, left their windows, in terror of the police because the police had their guns out, and were aiming the guns at the roofs. Then the salesman noticed that two of the policemen were beating up a kid: “So I spoke up and asked them, ‘why are you beating him like that?’ Police jump up and start swinging on me. He put the gun on me and said, ‘get over there.’ I said, ‘what for?’ ”

An unwise question.

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Ernest Becker’s “Immortality Project” Theory and The Pyramids

Ricardo Liberato via Wikimedia Commons.

Ricardo Liberato via Wikimedia Commons.

Anthropologist Ernest Becker proposed a particularly interesting premise in his 1973 book, The Denial of Death, which won the Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction in 1974. The book proposes that civilization is driven by a symbolic defense mechanism created by the awareness of our mortality, which acts as an intellectual and emotional response to our survival mechanism. In other words, people attempt to outlive their own lives by doing or becoming a part of something that will symbolically transcend their own death. It reminds me of the eerie quote at the beginning of the movie Troy.

“Men are haunted by the vastness of eternity. And so we ask ourselves: will our actions echo across the centuries? Will strangers hear our names long after we are gone, and wonder who we were, how bravely we fought, how fiercely we loved?” — Odysseus in the movie script of Troy

Becker suggests that there exists a fundamental duality between a symbolic world of human-defined meaning and the perceived physical world of objects.… Read the rest

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Kids need to like what they’re reading to progress

Kids need to be interested in the book they’re reading, so it’s better if they choose it themselves. Flickr/Mike Mantin, CC BY-SA

Kids need to be interested in the book they’re reading, so it’s better if they choose it themselves. Flickr/Mike Mantin, CC BY-SA

Ryan Spencer, University of Canberra

When we think of reading for our children, we are often misled into thinking that we need to focus on one type of book, such as picture books or novels in order to practise specific, reading-related skills. However, this narrowly-focused approach to reading instruction can often have undesirable benefits, such as turning kids off reading altogether.

As parents, we often feel that when we select children’s books for them we are supporting them to achieve at their level – though this frequently has the opposite effect.

When we restrict choice, particularly to contrived, boring texts, children frequently see this as an indicator of their reading capability and therefore meet that low expectation. Once we take the restrictions away from what children read, their self-efficacy towards reading increases, therefore leading to an increase in their reading ability.… Read the rest

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Today’s the kind of anniversary you need to commemorate! #McCutcheon

Re-published with permission from occupy.com 

Forget wedding anniversaries and birthdays – this is the type of anniversary worth remembering. You know, the kind that shoves your rights into an oligarchical garbage disposal and drenches justice in a foul toxic sludge. Happy Anniversary McCutcheon! (April 2nd, 2014)

Check out the video below and see his tweet to @ActOutOnOccupy – funny, I don’t remember reading that money was speech or that bribery was freedom…

For the full episode: https://youtu.be/J7GKt-Vzzoc
Follow us on @ActOutOnOccupy
Facebook.com/ActOutOnOccupy
occupy.com/actout

 

#McCutcheon tweets @ActOutOnOccupy

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The Hierarchy of Humanities Schadenfreude

Franz Kafka: Not a job creator

Franz Kafka: Not a job creator

Rebecca Schuman writes at Slate:

Carmen Maria Machado had a writing professor named Harvey Grossinger who changed her life. So profound was his influence that he inspired her to become a writer herself. Her article “O Adjunct! My Adjunct!”, which appeared recently in theNew Yorker, is a testament to Grossinger’s legacy—part living elegy, part call to arms for adjunct professors, in whose ranks he labored, poorly paid, and without benefits or job security. “What I wouldn’t figure out for the better part of [a] decade,” Machado writes, “was that Harvey was an adjunct. He didn’t tell us, and I didn’t know to ask.” She’d never even heard the term adjunct before, which is part of the reason she now finds herself in a similar position, for a similar pittance. “The adjuncts who teach well despite the low pay and the lack of professional support may inspire in their students a similar passion—prompting them to be financially taken advantage of in turn,” she writes.

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