Archive | Entertainment

What Movies Are You Watching This Weekend?

Still from The Zero Theorem.

Still from The Zero Theorem.

Do any of you Disinfonauts have movie plans for the weekend? Two films I’ve been highly anticipating are opening tonight: The Zero Theorem by Terry Gilliam and Tusk by Kevin Smith. Though, I’m not sure if I’m going to be able to get to a theater in the next few days. I did, however, finally finish reading The Trial by Franz Kafka and am hoping to find some time to watch Orson Welles’ version on Netflix. Do you have anything you want to check off your Netflix queue? Or any recommendations for me to add to mine?

I did catch As Above, So Below a couple of weeks ago. I’m probably one of the only people left who still has hope for the found footage subgenre, but I usually end up disappointed. As Above, So Below’s storyline had a lot of potential as Paris’ catacombs are fascinating, and I was excited to see how the filmmakers would utilize them.… Read the rest

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Better Things – The Life and Choices of Jeffrey Catherine Jones

Jeff catherine jones

Who Was Jeffrey Catherine Jones?

Frank Frazetta once called Jones the “greatest living painter.”

Born in 1944, Jones first published a comic book in 1965 (Blazing Combat #1). Jones quickly grew to popularity within the art community and went on to paint “covers for books, including the Ace paperback editions of Fritz Leiber’s Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser series and Andre Norton’s Postmarked the Stars, The Zero Stone, Uncharted Stars and many others. For a period during the early 1970s she also contributed illustrations to Ted White’s Fantastic. Jones drew many covers and short stories for a variety of comics publishers including DC Comics, Skywald Publications, and Warren but generally avoided the superhero genre.”

In 1998, Jones underwent hormone therapy. According to Steven Ringgenberg at The Comics Journal, “It’s now known from the artist’s personal writings that she had felt conflicted about her gender since childhood, always feeling a greater affinity for the fair sex than for her own maleness.Read the rest

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Kevin Smith’s TUSK Memorabilia Giveaway

1940001_527693247359457_755596116126798391_nTusk is creepy, enthralling and infused with Kevin’s distinct sense of humor.

Disinfo is honored to be running a giveaway of Tusk goodies for Kevin Smith’s highly anticipated horror-comedy. Tusk recently premiered at the Toronto Film Festival to rave reviews. Personally, I’ve been looking forward to this one for a while now, which makes this giveaway even more exciting for me!

Plot

The idea for Tusk came about when Smith saw a hoax-ad for an apartment on Gumtree. The ad’s creator requested that potential lodgers must agree to wear a Walrus costume for 2 hours a day in exchange for free rent. Go here to see the advert in all its glory.

A rehash of the plot by Henry Barnes at The Guardian (who gave the film four out of five stars):

 Silly and sick, with very little blubber, Tusk, a comedy-horror about a man who is turned into a walrus, is the first great Kevin Smith film since Dogma.

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Say You Want a Revolution: The Invisibles Started 20 Years Ago

invisiblesWhen people ask me what my favorite pieces of psychedelic literature from the last 20 years are, I immediately tell them Graham Hancock’s Supernatural and Grant Morrison’s The Invisibles without even having to think twice about it. Of course, I’m not sure if anyone I’ve ever told this has actually taken my advice and read either one, but I’ll just keep repeating it in the off hope that at least one person will have their mind blown by the genius of either one of those epics. When people ask me for suggestions regarding books about magick, The Invisibles immediately jumps to the top of my list. This usually leads to someone arguing with me and informing me that The Invisibles isn’t an instruction manual on how to do magick to which I reply, that’s exactly the point. Since you can sum up basic sigil magick techniques in a few paragraphs, and chaos magick was supposed to be about pushing these techniques forward and creatively fitting them to your subjective microverse, I have zero idea why books regurgitating technique are even of much value at this point.… Read the rest

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How the films you’ve seen influence your choice of dog

This article was originally published on The Conversation.
Read the original article.

By Flora Lisica, The Conversation

Did watching 101 Dalmatians instill you with a burning desire to fill your home with dozens of monochrome puppies? A new study suggests that may often be the case. The research suggests that all those great canine characters in films have been a prominent influence on the popularity of a breed among dog owners.

The impact of 29 films released in the United States was examined, each featuring a different dog breed. Classics such as The Wizard of Oz (1939), Lady and the Tramp (1955), The Fox and the Hound (1981) and Beethoven (1992) were all judged to have influenced people’s choice of dogs. The study traces the popularity of the featured breeds for up to ten years after the film’s release.

The authors used the records of the American Kennel Club, which has been recording the numbers of registration for each dog breed since 1927, and keeps the largest such dog registry in the world.… Read the rest

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5am Film Series: Butter Fingers

This was submitted to me via the Disinfo Contact Form.

Butter Fingers from J-Scott on Vimeo.

“Butter Fingers” explores some of the more unique items you might not want to let slip through your fingers. Let’s face it, if you can’t relate to dropping at least a handful of the items pictured, then you’re either utilizing duct-tape to it’s fullest potential or it was you who dropped the grenade. Condolences.

Creating “Butter Fingers” was no easy task and entirely a labor of love for the better part of 2 years. Finding time during evenings and weekends, until all hours of the morning occasionally, holidays etc. until the ground was filled with all the bits and pieces of unlucky items.

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David Cronenberg: ‘My imagination is not a place of horror’

David Cronenberg, Genie Awards 2012 by Alan Langford via Flickr. (CC by 2.0)

David Cronenberg, Genie Awards 2012 by Alan Langford via Flickr. (CC by 2.0)

Cronenberg compares himself to Gergor Samsa? I like him even more.

via The Guardian (Follow the link to read the entire interview):

When the great Canadian film-maker David Cronenberg turned 70 last year he felt, in a word, old. An admirer of Franz Kafka, he said he found himself comparing himself to Gregor Samsa, the protagonist of The Metamorphosis, who wakes up one morning to find – very Cronenbergian – that he’s become a giant beetle.

“You are a new creature,” Cronenberg explains. “Ask anybody who is not advanced in years what they think of 70-year-olds – if they think of them at all – and it’s Alzheimer’s, senile old people and Zimmer frames. Just, ‘Wow, what a burden on the healthcare system.’ Three score and ten, that’s supposed to be it, that’s the biblical age. So there are precedents for considering 70 to be a major moment in your life.”

Once he had come to terms with the shock, though, Cronenberg returned to his work with renewed vigour.

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The Golden Age of Sexual Taboos: How Indie Movies Brought Deranged Sex Acts to the Big Screen

Still from Lars von Trier's Antichrist

Still from Lars von Trier’s Antichrist

Interesting read brought to you by Gary M. Kramer at Salon via AlterNet:

I recently wrote an article on ethical dilemmas in torture porn and received some rather extreme reactions. Given that two new films—James Franco’s “Child of God” and Kim Ki-duk’s “Moebius”–depict some rather extreme sexual activities, it seemed appropriate to consider how sexual taboos are depicted in indie films.  “Child of God” features a tender scene of necrophilia, as Lester Ballard (Scott Haze) makes love to the corpse of a young woman he finds in a car. And over the past few years, indie films have produced some of the most haunting, bizarre scenes of deranged sexual behavior in the history of cinema.

“Love Is a Mad Dog From Hell” (aka “Crazy Love”) (1987), by Belgian writer/director Dominique Deruddere, is an outstanding adaptation of a trio of Charles Bukowski stories. Unfolding as a triptych, the last and most provocative act has the main character, Harry Voss (Josse De Pauw), making love to a corpse he and his buddy have stolen.

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Gummies Shaped Like Penises Outrage Parents in New Zealand

gummy_620x310

via The New Zealand Herald:

Inappropriately shaped lollies on sale exclusively in the South Island have been branded offensive and recalled from shops.

Barrie Aburn, of Dunedin, said his daughters Cadence (8), Rhianna (6) and Payton (5) bought a bag of Dragon Sweets from Moyles SuperValue in Green Island and gave it to him for his birthday.

Mr Aburn’s partner, Jacqui Hawkins, said she randomly took a sweet from the bag and found it was shaped in the form of male genitals.

Another lolly in the bag was a gummy baby with a penis, she said.

”I don’t find anything amusing about it at all. I find it disgusting,” she said.

Dutch Rusk managing director Willem Van de Geest, of Nelson, said the Stoke confectionery company imported 7200 bags of mixed gummy lollies, called Dragon Sweets, from a Chinese manufacturer about six weeks ago.

The lollies were distributed to shops in the lower South Island.

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Apocalypse Pooh: One of the earliest mash-ups (Bonus: Blue Peanuts)

I’m ashamed to say that I just came across this, thanks to Slate

This is by far the most meticulously edited mash-up I’ve seen. I’m very impressed. A hauntingly surreal Winnie the Pooh.

Apocalypse Pooh:

Via the YouTube page:

This is a recently remastered version of Todd Graham’s original 1987 VCR-made remix that appropriates famous fictional animals from Disney’s animated version of Winnie the Pooh and recasts them as characters in Francis Ford Coppola’s gritty Vietnam War drama Apocalypse Now. In the new narrative, the beloved Hundred Acre Wood is transformed into a horrific war zone in which Pooh, Piglet, and the rest of the gang struggle to keep their sanity. The humorous and slightly disturbing juxtaposition was an underground viral hit at comic book conventions, and bootlegged copies were passed around and traded on VHS tape. Graham’s work, which he called telejusting, differs in some respects from that of later media jammers in that it requires viewers to at least know, if not be a fan of, the original source material.

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