Archive | History

The Questions People Asked Advice Columnists in the Early 1700s

abfd02514Apparently people were slightly less banal in 1703 than they are today. At least, the folks who felt compelled to write-in questions.

Adrienne Lafrance at The Atlantic compiled her favorite questions and answers found in The Athenian Mercury Oracle, printed in 1703.

Here are a few (via The Atlantic):

Q: What is anger?
A: Anger is a passion of the irascible appetite caused by apprehension of a present evil, which may be repelled, but with some difficulty.

Q: Why is thunder more terrible in the night time?
A: In the dead of night, noises are rendered more distinct and consequently more terrible by the universal stillness everywhere else.

Q: In what space of time do you think the whole mass of blood circulates through the body!
A: ‘Tis probable in much shorter time than many have imagined… It will be circulated six or seven times over through the heart in the space of an hour.

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The X-Men are Sooo Gay

"Resolution" by Ponderosa http://destiny.ponderosa121.com/art-resolution/

“Resolution” by Ponderosa http://destiny.ponderosa121.com/art-resolution/

You might not have noticed through the dense fog of fantastic abilities, leather and spandex outfits, hot celebrity portrayal, general mayhem, and multiple future storylines, but X-Men represents the landmark queer literature of popular culture. Complete with secret identities, powers that awaken during puberty, viscous social and government oppression, as well the constant struggle for equality—there are few ongoing works that so totally embody the struggles of others, outsiders, revolutionaries, and other such nonconformists as wholly as X-Men does.

Filmmaker, comic book writer, and pop culture maniac Kevin Smith famously remarked: “Little kids walk out of the movie they’re all like, ‘That Wolverine! Snikt! Snikt!’ I’d go ‘Come here, little kid. Do you like Wolverine? That means you love cock. Nevermind Snikt, Snikt. Dick. Dick.'”

Wanna know more about the queer parallels in the X-Men universe? Here are a few time-vampirig papers, chapters, and articles on the subject.… Read the rest

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Things that are not in the Constitution

rights endowed

Seems like every day there is a new story about something some politician is doing or saying that isn’t in the Constitution. Just in case you’re losing track of exactly how many things are not in the constitution, there is a list linked below. Some of the things that are listed are implied powers. Others are powers that congress adopted through the necessary and proper clause. Some of the things listed are not in the constitution and are government policies that are outright unconstitutional. Others aren’t listed because they are considered state powers. Lastly, lots of the rights listed as not in the constitution are powers protected by the 9th and 10th Amendments. I just wish that they had mentioned that the word “democracy” isn’t in the Constitution.

Have you ever heard someone say, “That’s unconstitutional!” or “That’s my constitutional right!” and wondered if they were right? You might be surprised how often people get it wrong.

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Who wrote the works of Shakespeare? (Answer: Shakespeare)

Front Cover for KindleLast week would have been Shakespeare’s 451st birthday, had he been as immortal as his work. Some might say that you’d need to have lived that long to have garnered the experience, the wisdom, and even to have had the time (or sufficient typing monkeys) to have been both so prolific and profound as Shakespeare.

In the latest podcast from The Eternities, Nick Buchanan, author of What Happens in Shakespeare’s King Lear, explains why he believes it entirely possible that this one remarkable man could indeed have been the sole author.

“The folks who argue that [it couldn’t possibly have been] Shakespeare really dislike the idea that he didn’t go to university and he was a country boy. How dare he become this great playwright!”

Those who question Shakespeare’s authorship offer several alternatives – typically aristocrats – the most popular current candidate being Edward de Vere, 17th Earl of Oxford, while others have argued for highly educated urban intellectuals such as Francis Bacon.… Read the rest

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Race Riot of 1919 in Omaha — The Lynching of Will Brown

Americans across the nation were reactive to the wave of riots of 1967 which killed over 150 people, called the worst rioting this country saw up to then. The red summer riots of 1919 killed 150 people in individual cities. A dozen cities burned over the summer. I find it interesting that anarchists and white nationalists ganged together not just to burn several black ghettos in the north, but also to kill police officers.

Omaha is only one example of a collection of insurrections:

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The Use of DMT in Early Masonic Ritual

pinklazer1

I must say, the concept of DMT ritual being associated with freemasonry or the existence of psychedelic secret societies in the deep south are both topics I was completely unaware of until tipped off by a fellow esoteric writer on FB by the name of PD Newman. Compelling reading, for sure:

What qualifies a Man for the Seventh Order [of Masonry]? A. …the Composition of the Grand Elixir. (Post Boy Exposé, 1723)1

As outlandish as it may sound, allusions to the entheogenic properties of the acacia are commonplace in Masonic literature and various rituals. For, it would appear that the psychoactive nature of acacia was fairly widely known in certain Masonic circles at least up until the late 1700s. However, some time between the mid to late 18th century and the 19th century occult revival, the secrets of acacia, like the true word of a Master Mason, appear to have been lost.… Read the rest

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The Religion With No Name

This head of Odysseus was discovered in 1957 on the west coast of Italy between Rome and Naples, on the grounds of the former villa of the Roman Emperor Tiberius at Sperlonga. The original sculpture likely dates to the 1st century BC. Source: Wikimedia Commons

This head of Odysseus was discovered in 1957 on the west coast of Italy between Rome and Naples, on the grounds of the former villa of the Roman Emperor Tiberius at Sperlonga. The original sculpture likely dates to the 1st century BC.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Brian C. Muraresku via grahamhancock.com

“The man of a traditional culture sees himself as real only to the extent that he ceases to be himself. Plato could be regarded as the outstanding philosopher of ‘primitive mentality’ – the thinker who succeeded in giving philosophic currency and validity to the modes of life and behavior of archaic humanity.”1

Mircea Eliade

The Real Hippies

What’s become of religion these days? Seriously. More than a billion people across the planet are religiously unaffiliated. That includes one in every five Americans and Europeans, and – believe it or not – almost half of the British public. Impressive as those numbers are today, just imagine the future of the Western world.

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The Armenian Genocide, and the Supreme Evil of Human Stubbornness

The Armenian quarter of Adana left pillaged and destroyed after the massacres in Adana in 1909.

The Armenian quarter of Adana left pillaged and destroyed after the massacres in Adana in 1909.

Last Friday was the 100th anniversary of the Armenian Genocide, an event which, if you’re a Turkish government official, you’re much more likely to refer to with some nauseating euphemism like “the 1915 hostilities with Armenia” or “the period of mutual Turkish-Armenian suffering.” But no matter what name you put on it, it was an event where 1 million or more people died, nearly all of them Armenian, as a direct result of deliberate planning by the government ruling Turkey at the time.

I’m not Armenian, nor have I even been to Armenia. But in my life so far, I’ve come across my fair share of Armenians. My freshman year roommate in college was a native-born Armenian. His family had left the country and set up camp, as many others before them had, in Glendale. During my time in Argentina, I’ve come across a number of descendants of Armenian refugees who came to the country as a result of the 1915 genocide.… Read the rest

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VIDEO: Peace Prize Laureate Launches Campaign to Stop Killer Robots After Winning Ban on Landmines


From DemocracyNow!:

In 1997 Jody Williams won the Nobel Peace Prize for her work with the International Campaign to Ban Landmines. In 2013 she helped launch the Campaign to Stop Killer Robots. “Who is accountable? Is it the man who programmed it? Is it Lockheed Martin, who built it?” Williams asks in an interview at The Hague, where she has joined 1,000 female peace activists gathered to mark the founding of the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom. Williams notes how some “spider-like” robots that spray tear gas are now used for crowd control, but could be stopped before they become widespread. She recalls how she was previously able to “force the governments of the world to come together and discuss [landmines]. They thought they would fly under the radar … A small group of people can and do change the world.”

Full Story at DemocracyNow.org

More info at StopKillerRobots.org

Watch a 2012 video of Amy Goodman speaking with Jody Williams on killer robots.… Read the rest

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We Stand to Lose Everything

Aaron Dames writes for Divided Core.

 

We are like butterflies who flutter for a day and think it is forever.
— Carl Sagan

As the 100th anniversary of World War I rolls around, dignitaries and diplomats are commemorating the costly victories and tragic losses of that brutal and gaseous four-year melee which resulted in the deaths of somewhere between ten to sixteen million people. World War I set the stage for its horrific sequel, World War II, which showcased another four years of agonizing mayhem, replicated genocides, and the creation of a Hell on Earth. Millions of people died on battlefields, in death camps, and of disease, starvation, and lack of sanitation in galactic pits of unfathomable misery and suffering. World War II then set the stage for the Cold War, in which the United States, the Soviet Union, and eventually other jingoistic nuclear powers, held humanity hostage through aggressive threats of apocalyptic war.… Read the rest

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