Archive | History

Why Are There Any Jobs Still Left?

A Ghost In The Machine

Robert Bailey via Reason.com:

After two centuries of relentless automation, why are there more jobs than ever? Certainly, tens of millions of jobs have been lost. Whatever happened to the myriads of hostlers, blacksmiths, coopers, sucksmiths, millers, tallowmakers, wheelwrights, sicklemen, puddlers, telegraphers, stockingers, fellmongers, saddlers, ploughmen, knackers, bleacherers, weavers, thatchers, and scriveners? Most of these jobs have been either wiped out entirely or largely taken over by machines.

The advance of massively more productive machinery has clearly not led to mass unemployment. The number of people employed in advanced economies has never been higher. For example, since 1950 the number of Americans employed has nearly tripled, rising from about 58 million to nearly 149 million today. During that time the proportion of adults in the civilian workforce rose from 55 percent in 1950 to peak at 65 percent during the dot-com boom in 2000. The ratio has now dropped to 59 percent, but the lower rate is widely understood to reflect the fallout from the Great Recession, Baby Boomer cohort retirements, and younger individuals spending more time in school.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

“Jesus Was Black,” Reveals Newly Found Manuscript

black-jesus

Bob Flanagan via Global Research/World News Daily Report:

A team of archeologists from the University of Tel Aviv have uncovered a collection of ancient scrolls in the West Bank region, near the Qumran Caves, where the Dead Sea Scrolls were originally uncovered in 1947, and which promise to shed a new light on the life and physical appearance of Jesus Christ.

The newly found documents which are believed to have been written by a small Jewish sectarian group, called the Essenes, retraces different elements of the Old Testament and New Testament similar to the Dead Sea Scrolls, but scholars have turned their attention to a peculiar fragment which describes the birth of the Christ figure in a new light. 

The manuscripts that have been dated between 408 BCE to 318 CE describe the son of Mary as of a “darker color” of skin than her parents, a revealing bit of information admits professor Hans Schummer.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

Gruesome Find: 100 Bodies Stuffed into Ancient House

The 5,000-year-old house found in China was about 14 by 15 feet in size.  Credit: Photo courtesy Chinese Archaeology

The 5,000-year-old house found in China was about 14 by 15 feet in size.
Credit: Photo courtesy Chinese Archaeology

Remains of 97 bodies have been discovered in a 5,000 year old house in China. It’s likely that these people were victims of an epidemic.

Owen Jarus via Live Science:

The remains of 97 human bodies have been found stuffed into a small 5,000-year-old house in a prehistoric village in northeast China, researchers report in two separate studies.

The bodies of juveniles, young adults and middle-age adults were packed together in the house — smaller than a modern-day squash court — before it burnt down. Anthropologists who studied the remains say a “prehistoric disaster,” possibly an epidemic of some sort, killed these people.

The site, whose modern-day name is “Hamin Mangha,” dates back to a time before writing was used in the area, when people lived in relatively small settlements, growing crops and hunting for food.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

Strange find in tunnels under Paris

Catacombs Paris 1

The Paris Police Force is tasked with policing the 170 miles of tunnels and catacombs running beneath the city of Paris. In 2004 they made an intriguing discovery.

Behind that, a tunnel held a desk and a closed-circuit TV camera set to automatically record images of anyone passing. The mechanism also triggered a tape of dogs barking, “clearly designed to frighten people off,” the spokesman said.

Further along, the tunnel opened into a vast 400 sq metre cave some 18m underground, “like an underground amphitheatre, with terraces cut into the rock and chairs”.

There the police found a full-sized cinema screen, projection equipment, and tapes of a wide variety of films, including 1950s film noir classics and more recent thrillers. None of the films were banned or even offensive, the spokesman said.

A smaller cave next door had been turned into an informal restaurant and bar. “There were bottles of whisky and other spirits behind a bar, tables and chairs, a pressure-cooker for making couscous,” the spokesman said.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

From the Sumerians to Shakespeare to Twain: why fart jokes never get old

English caricaturist Richard Newton’s 1798 cartoon depicts John Bull farting on the face of King George III. Library of Congress

English caricaturist Richard Newton’s 1798 cartoon depicts John Bull farting on the face of King George III. Library of Congress

Farting is a universal human experience, as routine as eating, breathing and sleeping. And it seems to be a cross-cultural and trans-historical fact that passing gas, at least in most social contexts, is rude and offensive.

There’s also the fundamental truth pertaining to the topic: farts are funny. But why is this the case? They’re often a source of discomfort and embarrassment, so why do they double as an inspiration for humor, even literary beauty?

Literary giants let it rip

Every culture in recorded history has had its preferred forms of humor relating to bodily functions, but none have been more reliable in stirring a reaction than fart jokes. In fact, according to British academic and poet Paul MacDonald, the oldest joke in recorded history – which dates back to the Sumerians in 1900 BC – was a fart joke: “Something which has never occurred since time immemorial; a young woman did not fart in her husband’s lap.”

Fart jokes have also found their way into some of the classics of Western literature.… Read the rest

Continue Reading

Decapitated victims discovered at excavation in Mexico

aztec foto_home

Archaeologists have recently uncovered the remains of decapitated victims of human sacrifice left by the Aztecs.

Martin Barillas via Spero News:

Mexico’s National Institute of Anthropology and History announced on August 20 that archaeologists have found the macabre remains of human sacrifice left behind by Mexico’s Aztec ancestors.

Known as a tzompantli in the language of the Aztecs, Nahuatl. The find consists of a rack of the skulls of human sacrificial victims that was once part of the Templo Mayor complex in Tenochtitlan – the capital of the Aztecs that is now Mexico City.

The tzompantli was found on Calle Republica de Guatemala, a street that runs at the eastern end of the colonial-era Metropolitan Cathedral in the modern city’s central square. This is the first such skull rack that has been found that is mortared together. The human skulls found by the researchers were used almost like bricks. Some of the skulls had holes pierced through them at the temples.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

6 Things You Didn’t Know About Bees in Greece

Credit: Jan Wellmann

Credit: Jan Wellmann

This article originally appeared on HoneyColony.

“Aristaeus wept, when he saw all his bees killed and honeycombs abandoned incomplete.” ~ Ovid

Bees In Greece

The air smells of smoke and lemons and the cicadas chirp loudly and steadily, like high-speed drills, as I come upon 16 bee hives clustered together in a dry field. What I’ve just discovered is mere steps away from “Demokritos,” the National Centre for Scientific Research in Athens, the largest multidisciplinary research institute in Greece.  Every so often, pagoda, pine, and olive trees sway gently in the breeze, but overall the climate in Attica, the historic region that encompasses the capital, is hot and arid.

The scent is actually coming from lemon balm leaves, which associate researcher and apiculturist, Dr. Sofia Gounari, has placed in her smoker to calm the bees. It’s an attractive aroma to the virgin sisters of toil because it’s similar to the secretions they give off when communicating with one another, she explains.… Read the rest

Continue Reading

‘Sea Monster’ Figurehead Hauled from the Baltic Sea

Credit: Foto Ingemar Lundgren, Ocean Discovery

Credit: Foto Ingemar Lundgren, Ocean Discovery

A ship figurehead from the flagship of King Hans of Denmark, the Gribshunden, has been recovered. It resembles either a “cowling dog or perhaps a fantastical sea dragon with a helpless human clutched in its jaws.” The ship last sailed in 1495 and this figurehead could provide clues into how ships were once built.

Tia Ghose via Live Science:

The sunken ship could provide an unprecedented look at how warships were made at that pivotal time in world history.

“What is unique is that there are no other warships from this time in the world,” said Marcus Sandekjer, the director of the Blekinge Museum in Karlskrona, Sweden, where the figurehead is being kept.

The Gribshunden, or the “Grip Dog,” could even provide clues to the construction of the ships that Christopher Columbus used to sail to North America, he added.

The team isn’t quite sure what a “grip dog” is.

Read the rest
Continue Reading