Archive | History

Ancient Egyptian Woman with 70 Hair Extensions Discovered

Credit: Photo by Jolanda Bos and Lonneke Beukenholdt

Credit: Photo by Jolanda Bos and Lonneke Beukenholdt

via Live Science:

More than 3,300 years ago, in a newly built city in Egypt, a woman with an incredibly elaborate hairstyle of lengthy hair extensions was laid to rest.

She was not mummified, her body simply being wrapped in a mat. When archaeologists uncovered her remains they found she wore “a very complex coiffure with approximately 70 extensions fastened in different layers and heights on the head,” writes Jolanda Bos, an archaeologist working on the Amarna Project, in an article recently published in the Journal of Egyptian Archaeology.

Researchers don’t know her name, age or occupation, but she is one of hundreds of people, including many others whose hairstyles are still intact, who were buried in a cemetery near an ancient city now called Amarna. [See Photos of the Egyptian Skeletons and Elaborate Hairstyles]

This city was constructed as a new capital of Egypt by Akhenaten (reign ca.

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Better Things – The Life and Choices of Jeffrey Catherine Jones

Jeff catherine jones

Who Was Jeffrey Catherine Jones?

Frank Frazetta once called Jones the “greatest living painter.”

Born in 1944, Jones first published a comic book in 1965 (Blazing Combat #1). Jones quickly grew to popularity within the art community and went on to paint “covers for books, including the Ace paperback editions of Fritz Leiber’s Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser series and Andre Norton’s Postmarked the Stars, The Zero Stone, Uncharted Stars and many others. For a period during the early 1970s she also contributed illustrations to Ted White’s Fantastic. Jones drew many covers and short stories for a variety of comics publishers including DC Comics, Skywald Publications, and Warren but generally avoided the superhero genre.”

In 1998, Jones underwent hormone therapy. According to Steven Ringgenberg at The Comics Journal, “It’s now known from the artist’s personal writings that she had felt conflicted about her gender since childhood, always feeling a greater affinity for the fair sex than for her own maleness.Read the rest

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Infographic: The Fatal Wounds of King Richard III

Via Live Science:

A study of King Richard III’s bones uncovered 11 injuries inflicted near the time of death by common Late Medieval weapons. Although the king was wearing armor in battle, the head injuries are consistent with his helmet having been lost or removed. A pelvis injury was likely inflicted after death.

Four of the wounds to the face, skull and ribs were likely due to dagger stabs. Another, likely fatal, wound to the rear of the skull, was likely due to a sword strike. The largest wound to the head, penetrating deep into the brain, likely came from either a sword or the spike atop a halberd.

[Read the full story on the postmortem analysis of Richard III's Skeleton]

Chart shows dagger, sword and halberd wounds to the king's skeleton.

Source:LiveScience

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The Potato That Killed!

Beer and chips by Quinn Dombrowski via Flickr. (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Beer and chips by Quinn Dombrowski via Flickr. (CC BY-SA 2.0)

A tale of science gone wrong.

via io9:

They thought they had created the perfect potato – but they were wrong. In a dramatic tale of science gone wrong, a killer potato rises from a secret breeding program, intent on killing those who wronged it. Learn about… the Lenape potato!

All right, perhaps the potato wasn’t invested with a sense of revenge. After all, it was only going about its business, and defending itself against those who would destroy it. Mainly insects. All potatoes, and other plants in the same family, like tomatoes, contain different kinds of glycoalkaloids. These give them a distinctive flavor that humans sometimes enjoy, but that insects hate.

One of these glycoalkaloids is solanine. Solanine generally collects in the stems, leaves, and eyes of the potato. A little does no harm, but too much cause cramps, dizziness, nausea, and diarrhea.

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Apocalypse Pooh: One of the earliest mash-ups (Bonus: Blue Peanuts)

I’m ashamed to say that I just came across this, thanks to Slate

This is by far the most meticulously edited mash-up I’ve seen. I’m very impressed. A hauntingly surreal Winnie the Pooh.

Apocalypse Pooh:

Via the YouTube page:

This is a recently remastered version of Todd Graham’s original 1987 VCR-made remix that appropriates famous fictional animals from Disney’s animated version of Winnie the Pooh and recasts them as characters in Francis Ford Coppola’s gritty Vietnam War drama Apocalypse Now. In the new narrative, the beloved Hundred Acre Wood is transformed into a horrific war zone in which Pooh, Piglet, and the rest of the gang struggle to keep their sanity. The humorous and slightly disturbing juxtaposition was an underground viral hit at comic book conventions, and bootlegged copies were passed around and traded on VHS tape. Graham’s work, which he called telejusting, differs in some respects from that of later media jammers in that it requires viewers to at least know, if not be a fan of, the original source material.

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End of an Era: Leonard Maltin’s Movie Guides

vuhh3thjjjnlzoknw9pnFilm criticism has never garnered the level of mainstream interest that I would have liked, but with the passing of Ebert and now Maltin’s retirement of The Movie Guide, are we never to see film critics hit the mainstream again?

As a kid, I remember climbing up on the bookshelf to pull Maltin’s Movie Guide down so my parents and I could look up the movie we were watching. It was an invaluable resource that is no longer as necessary as it once was.

via io9:

Reading Robbie Gonzalez’s article about Mat Honan’s lament for the iPod Classic made me think of another entertainment colossus that was recently, and just as quietly, retired: Leonard Maltin’s Movie Guide, which is ending with the 2015 edition published just last month.

Maltin was, like his contemporary Roger Ebert, a crucial figure in making classic movies and the language of film criticism accessible to a mass audience, and like Ebert a big part of that appeal was personality.

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The Clash of the Shakespeareans

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I tried to think of a fitting Shakespearean insult that would suit this, but I came up short. I did, however, find this fun Shakespeare Insulter.

via The Guardian:

Shakespeare wasn’t immune to throwing around the odd insult, penning some of the greatest put-downs in the history of the English language.

“Thine face is not worth sunburning”; “Thou art as fat as butter”; “You are as a candle, the better part burnt out”.

But now the Bard himself is at the centre of some distinctly colourful language after academics traded blows over the publication of a Shakespearean journal.

The row erupted when one professor submitted a paper in which he cited evidence that poems and plays attributed to the “man from Stratford” were in fact written by Edward de Vere, Earl of Oxford.

The essay – intended for the Italian journal, Memoria di Shakespeare – was said to examine the case for the theory as well as “the conscious and unconscious psychological factors behind the taboo against openly discussing the authorship question”.

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How the Government and Private Elites Have Teamed Up for Decades to Astroturf America

Dean G. Acheson, U.S. Secretary of State, January 21, 1949 to January 20, 1953

Dean G. Acheson, U.S. Secretary of State, January 21, 1949 to January 20, 1953

Recently it was reported that a blue-ribbon, anti-Iran nonprofit is so well-connected that it may have been working intimately with the U.S. government behind the scenes. Journalist Glenn Greenwald wondered whether the group, United Against Nuclear Iran, is in fact a government front. That would hardly be as unusual as you’d think.

After serving as President Harry Truman’s secretary of state, Dean Acheson reminisced that 1940s organizations he had supported — the Committee to Defend America by Aiding the Allies and the Citizens’ Committee for the Marshall Plan — were “uniquely and typically American.” Many groups engage in protest, Acheson noted, but “few organize privately to support Government, and fewer still to support policies and measures not directly beneficial to themselves or their group.”

My research discloses that these organizations, far from being extraordinary, were just the most famous of dozens of elite, bipartisan “citizens committees” that have secretly collaborated with the administration of the day, whether Democratic or Republican.… Read the rest

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