Archive | Mystery

The Octopus Tree of Oregon

Alicia Mueller (CC BY 2.0)

Alicia Mueller (CC BY 2.0)

The Octopus Tree, a Sitka Spruce, is located on the Oregon coast, only a few hundred feet from the Cape Meares Lighthouse. The tree is suspected to be between 250 – 300 years old.

How the Spruce came to be shaped like an octopus is unknown, but there are two popular theories. Some suspect that it was used formed by Native Americans to hold canoes and the dead. Others think it was just formed by extreme weather.

The sign posted in front of the tree reads:

The Forces that shaped this unique Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis) have been debated for many years. Whether natural events or possible Native Americans were the cause remains a mystery.

The tree measures more than 46 feed in circumference and has no central trunk. Instead, limbs extend horizontally from the base as much as 16 feet before turning upward. It is 105 feet tall and is estimated to be 250 to 300 years old.

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Talking Acid, Feminism, and UFOs with Visionary Director Phil Mucci (Plus Torche’s Annihilation Affair Video Debut)

torche_stills11One thing I’m constantly trying to relay about next level communication is that it doesn’t happen with words, but rather through means of subjectively projected telepathic metaphor. In the vast majority of UFO contactee reports, one encounters similar stories about blackened psionic eyes that peer directly into the soul. Eyes that can project and receive pure information. Metaphorically of course, I’d argue that we’re unconsciously engaging in this pursuit with our increasingly art-centric lifestyles. Theses days, half of our experiences involve movies, video games, albums, celebrity sex fantasies, and cutesy kitten GIFS. The reason I’m mentioning this, for probably the bajillionth time, has to do with this interview I just did with the visionary music video director Phil Mucci (who’s films other films you can check out here, or read my top 5 list of here). I honestly knew very little about Phil when I stumbled on his work last fall, but through watching his subversive psychedelic shorts, I realized that I knew far more about him than I initially thought.… Read the rest

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“How to Build a Universe That Doesn’t Fall Apart Two Days Later” by Philip K. Dick, 1978

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Philip k dick drawing” by Pete Welsch from Washington, DC, USA – Philip K Dick. Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons.

 

Via Deoxy.org

by Philip K. Dick 1978

First, before I begin to bore you with the usual sort of things science fiction writers say in speeches, let me bring you official greetings from Disneyland. I consider myself a spokesperson for Disneyland because I live just a few miles from it—and, as if that were not enough, I once had the honor of being interviewed there by Paris TV.

For several weeks after the interview, I was really ill and confined to bed. I think it was the whirling teacups that did it. Elizabeth Antebi, who was the producer of the film, wanted to have me whirling around in one of the giant teacups while discussing the rise of fascism with Norman Spinrad… an old friend of mine who writes excellent science fiction.… Read the rest

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Unraveling the Internet’s oldest and weirdest mystery

Photo via NASA/Wikipedia (PD) | Xpicto/Wikipedia (CC-BY-SA-2.5)

Photo via NASA/Wikipedia (PD) | Xpicto/Wikipedia (CC-BY-SA-2.5)

Via Kevin Morris at The Kernel:

Spam. It’s the Internet’s most resilient parasite. Millions of messages pollute the Web’s pipes every day. Grow a monster penis. Lose 20 pounds. Help out an African prince. You know the drill.

A lot of it is garbled junk, sentences that read like a computer ingested the Oxford English Dictionary and vomited it back out. The results are bizarre and often unintentionally hilarious, a favorite subject of forwarded emails or, in the age of Twitter, cult celebrity. Spam account @Horse_ebooks boasts 192,000 followers, thanks entirely to the seemingly accidental and absurdist poetry of its tweets.

But back in 1996, users of the proto-Web community Usenet got spammed with messages that reached an almost transcendent level of bizarre—a weirdness so precise it implied the influence of a very human intelligence. “Markovian Parallax Denigrate,” read the title of each post, followed by a mountain of seemingly meaningless word spew:

jitterbugging McKinley Abe break Newtonian inferring caw update Cohen
air collaborate rue sportswriting rococo invocate tousle shadflower
Debby Stirling pathogenesis escritoire adventitious novo ITT most
chairperson Dwight Hertzog different pinpoint dunk McKinley pendant
firelight Uranus episodic medicine ditty craggy flogging variac
brotherhood Webb impromptu file countenance inheritance cohesion
refrigerate morphine napkin inland Janeiro nameable yearbook hark

According to later accounts, hundreds of these messages flooded Usenet discussion groups on Aug.

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It’s a sci-fi trope, but are “beings of pure energy” really possible?

“Beings of pure energy” are oft-used tropes in sci-fi. They have no physical bodies, tend to be “enlightened,” and transcend time and space. But, is this transcendent state possible? Xaq Rzetelny at Ars Technica investigates:

If you’ve experienced science fiction in any of its many forms, chances are you’ve encountered “energy beings.” Unlike the other aliens in sci-fi, they have no ‘physical’ bodies but rather exist as beings of pure energy. They’re usually able to flit about the Universe at will and often demonstrate great abilities befitting their advanced, ultra-evolved state.

They are also typically portrayed as more powerful, more enlightened, and possessing a deeper understanding of the universe. It’s almost a given in most science fiction that sufficiently advanced civilizations will eventually develop this way. Converting themselves into beings of pure energy seems like the ultimate stage in the development of any civilization. It’s a ubiquitous trope—as if “pure energy” is our own mass cultural idea of humankind’s far future.

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Cruz Won’t Say How Much Wife Makes at Goldman Sachs

Zaid Jilani Via Alternet:

Why Did Ted Cruz Refuse to Disclose How Much His Wife—a VP at Goldman Sachs—Makes?

Texas Republican Senator Ted Cruz has announced his intention to run for the presidency. He is widely expected to tap into the Tea Party base of the Republican party and posit himself as anti-establishment – in this case, an establishment that is too weak-kneed and too willing to compromise with the Democrats.

But a curious statement on Cruz’s financial disclosure shows that he may not be so opposed to the establishment he rails against. See, Cruz’s wife is a vice president at Goldman Sachs, the megabank so close to the powers in Washington that it is often jokingly referred to as “Government Sachs.” Because spousal income is shared, it is required for Members of Congress to list their spouse’s employement if it gives them over $1,000. They are not required to list the exact income their spouse receives, but they are certainly allowed to if they are willing to be that transparent.

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9-Foot ‘Butcher Crocodile’ Likely Ruled Before Dinosaurs

A life reconstruction of the giant crocodile ancestor (Carnufex carolinensis) that lived some 231 million years ago in what is now North Carolina. Credit: Copyright Jorge Gonzales. Open access

A life reconstruction of the giant crocodile ancestor (Carnufex carolinensis) that lived some 231 million years ago in what is now North Carolina.
Credit: Copyright Jorge Gonzales. Open access

Bad. Ass.

Jeanna Bryner via Live Science:

A 9-foot-tall beast with bladelike teeth once stalked the warm and wet environs of what is now North Carolina some 230 million years ago, before dinosaurs came onto the scene there, scientists have found.

Now called Carnufex carolinensis, the crocodile ancestor likely walked on its hind legs, preying on armored reptiles and early mammal relatives in its ecosystem, the researchers say.

They named it Carnufex, meaning “butcher” in Latin, because of its long skull, which resembles a knife, and its bladelike teeth, which it likely used to slice flesh off the bones of prey, said lead study author Lindsay Zanno, of NC State University and the NC Museum of Natural Sciences. “‘Butcher’ seemed a very appropriate way to get that into the minds of people,” Zanno told Live Science in an interview.

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Live Dodo or Hoax?

This is probably a hoax (actually I’m about 99% sure it is). But I always get a kick out of hearing about the newest cryptozoology findings.

This film was allegedly shot in Costa Rica. It appears to capture a bird very similar in appearance to a Dodo. Unfortunately, the filmmakers should have done their research. Dodo birds never lived on Costa Rica, they were endemic to the Mauritius island. A bit of an oversight, eh?

h/t Unexplained Mysteries.

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