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Study: 11% of Americans Think HTML Is an STD

This blows my mind. Back in 2014, a study from VoucherCloud which was published in the LA Times found that about 11% of people thought HTML was an STD. They also found that 23% of people thought MP3 was a Star Wars reboot.

I really hope the numbers have started to decrease.

Jessica Roy via TIME:

Had a particularly raucous night that ended with you doing the walk of shame the next morning? Uh oh, hope you don’t get HTML. Just kidding! HTML is a programming language that’s used to make websites, but according to a new study from VoucherCloudand published by the L.A. Times, 1 in every 9 Americans–or exactly 11%–think HTML is actually a sexually transmitted disease. VoucherCloud surveyed 2,392 people ages 18 or older and, according to theL.A. Times, “were given both tech and non-tech terms and were asked to choose from three possible definitions.” The results?

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AT&T Charges $40-$50 less for gigabit broadband in markets where Google Fiber exists


Yay for price gouging!

Chris Morran via The Consumerist:

If you have AT&T wireless service, your voice/data plan is going to cost you the same amount of money each month regardless of your home address. But AT&T’s broadband division isn’t taking this one-price-fits-all approach, and is continuing to sell broadband access that can range in price by $40/month, depending on where you live… and apparently whether Google Fiber is in the area.

Yesterday, the Death Star touted GigaPower availability in more than a half-dozen new GigaPower markets, including Chicago, Atlanta, Nashville, Orlando, Miami, and San Antonio.

We noticed that — rather than make a big splash about this news with one huge press release — AT&T broke down each market into its own statement. Why? One reason has to be that prices can vary so much from area to area.

In Atlanta and Nashville, GigaPower starts at $70/month for 1Gbps data speeds.

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Exposure to toxic chemicals threatening human reproduction and health

Farmall Tractor Pull 2015

University of California, San Francisco via ScienceDaily:

Dramatic increases in exposure to toxic chemicals in the last four decades are threatening human reproduction and health, according to the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO), the first global reproductive health organization to take a stand on human exposure to toxic chemicals.

The opinion was written by obstetrician-gynecologists and scientists from the major global, US, UK and Canadian reproductive health professional societies, the World Health Organization and the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF).

FIGO, which represents obstetricians from 125 countries and territories, published the opinion in the International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics on Oct. 1, 2015, just prior to its Oct. 4 to 9, 2015, world congress in Vancouver, BC, where more than 7,000 clinicians and scientists will explore global trends in women’s health issues.

“We are drowning our world in untested and unsafe chemicals, and the price we are paying in terms of our reproductive health is of serious concern,” said Gian Carlo Di Renzo, MD, PhD, Honorary Secretary of FIGO and lead author of the FIGO opinion.

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Moon Glass, A Ceramic Liquor Cup That Displays Different Phases of the Moon


Drink your liquor, change the stages of the moon!

A South Korean design company, Tale Co., Ltd., “has created the Moon Glass, a clever ceramic liquor glass that displays different phases of the moon as your drink from it. The glasses are available to purchase in sets of two small or large cups from their website.”

via Laughing Squid.

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Demanding Medicare-for-All, Medical Students Rise Up Nationwide

The United States is the only industrialized nation in the world that does not guarantee universal health care. Medical students say that must change. (Poster detail: Students For A National Health Program (SNaHP))

The United States is the only industrialized nation in the world that does not guarantee universal health care. Medical students say that must change. (Poster detail: Students For A National Health Program (SNaHP))

Taking a stand for the future of their profession and the healthcare needs of the nation, medical students across the U.S. are holding rallies and demonstrations on Thursday demanding the creation of a non-profit, publicly financed, single-payer system—a solution, they say, that is long overdue.

Led by the Students for a National Health Program (SNaHP), the student arm of Physicians for a National Health Program (PNHP), and working in coalition with numerous other groups—including the American Medical Student Association, WhiteCoats4BlackLives, the Latino Medical Student Association, Universities Allied for Essential Medicine, California Health Professional Student Alliance, and Pre-Health Dreamers—the future doctors and their supporters are holding teach-ins, rallies, and candlelight vigils at dozens of med school campuses and public venues throughout the day and evening as they call attention to “the millions of people in the U.S.… Read the rest

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‘Citizen Kane’ to ‘Call of Duty’: The rise of video games in universities


Dead Bug Creek, Ashley Pinnick’s final project

Jessica Conditt via engadget:

Picture an art school. Visualize the hallways of a university dedicated to the arts, the classrooms lined with paint tubes, charcoal sticks and nude models. Imagine the galleries where outgoing seniors present their final projects. Consider the thick-framed glasses that sit atop students’ noses as they sketch, sculpt, write and design the things that lurk in their wildest daydreams. Now picture a creation so strange that the school’s professors aren’t sure how to critique it from an artistic angle, let alone how to assign it a grade.

In Pasadena, California, Art Center College of Design graduate Ashley Pinnick faced this problem in her last semester, with her final project: a video game.

Specifically, Pinnick’s project was a quirky exploration game for Oculus’ VR headset called Dead Bug Creek. It was wildly different from her peers’ creations in the Illustration degree program, but not because it was more experimental or nonsensical: It was the only video game on display because Art Center didn’t have a technical video game development program.

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Breakfast of Gentrifiers at the Cereal Killer Café

cerealIf you want to protest against inequality and the (lack of) affordability of housing as relentless waves of gentrification price residents out of traditional working class neighborhoods, naturally you’d want to attack the post-modern breakfast haunt of the invading hipsters, right? From Citylab:

London’s gentrification debate has taken a bizarre turn in the past week. On Saturday night, demonstrators staging an impromptu anti-displacement protest in heavily gentrified East London cut loose and attacked a local landmark, daubing it with paint. Curiously, their chosen target wasn’t a new skyscraper or luxury apartment development. It was a café. One that specializes in selling cereal.

The choice of the Cereal Killer Café as target might seem odd, but the protest has clearly struck a chord. The U.K. media has been debating it furiously all week, while as a Londoner my Facebook and Twitter feeds have been so dominated by the story I’ve honestly been a little reluctant to go near my computer.

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Reckless Kelly, Dawes, Banned Book Week, the Pope and Kim Davis

From the Indie Bohemians:

Ron Placone talks about the Pope and Kim Davis, Banned Book Week, and more!

Angie Dorin rocks a Monkey Minute and Krish Mohan a FFON.

We’ve got multiple guests this week! First, we’ve got an interview from Sarah Cambridge from WMTS with Dawes, live from Pilgrimage Fest in Franklin, TN! Later, Ron interviews Cody from Reckless Kelly. Ron and Cody talk the band’s last album, Idaho, and speaking out against war in the Country music world.

If the above player doesn’t work, please go here.

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