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Lancet Editor: ‘The case against science is straightforward: much of the scientific literature, perhaps half, may simply be untrue.’

Dr. Richard Horton, Editor in Chief, the Lancet.

Dr. Richard Horton, Editor in Chief, the Lancet.

The Lancet is one of – if the not the – most prestigious medical science journals, so when its editor-in-chief writes that “The case against science is straightforward: much of the scientific literature, perhaps half, may simply be untrue,” you know that something’s rotten in Denmark. Collective Evolution reports on Richard Horton’s pronouncement:

In the past few years more professionals have come forward to share a truth that, for many people, proves difficult to swallow. One such authority is Dr. Richard Horton, the current editor-in-chief of the Lancet – considered to be one of the most well respected peer-reviewed medical journals in the world.

Dr. Horton recently published a statement declaring that a lot of published research is in fact unreliable at best, if not completely false.

“The case against science is straightforward: much of the scientific literature, perhaps half, may simply be untrue.

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Collective Transformation Through Deep Explorations of Mind with Christopher Bache – Free Radical Media

Also listen to Free Radical Media via Itunes.

In this episode, Professor of Philosophy and Religious Studies Dr. Christopher Bache, PhD joins the Free Radical Crew to discuss the implications of healing the collective as well as the individual psyche through the use of transpersonal states of consciousness. Along the way, we converse on Buddhism, Hinduism, the religious experience, entheogens, and what the future holds for our environment and our species. We also focus heavily on Baches’ excellent and informative book, “Dark Night, Early Dawn,” a must have book for anyone studying consciousness.

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The Meteorite Sword

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“The Sword of Heaven” (The Tentetsutou)  is a katana made from the four-billion-year-old meteorite, Gibeon. The Gibeon meteorites “are the largest known shower of extra terrestrial bodies ever to land on Earth.”

It is thought that the original body that comprised the Gibeon Meteorites would have been about 4 x 4 x 1.5 m and would have fragmented shortly after entering the Earth’s atmosphere.”

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The Most Common Mental Health Problem is ‘Contagious’

via Psyblog:

Anxiety is ‘contagious’ and can be passed from parents to children and the other way, a new study finds.

The ‘catching’ nature of anxious thoughts and behaviours exists over and above the effects of genetics.

That’s the conclusion of a new study of twins conducted by researchers in the UK.

Professor Thalia Eley, who led the study, said that anxious parents should avoid passing it on to their children through their behaviour:

“Our research shows that even if you have had to cope with high levels of anxiety yourself, it is not inevitable that this will follow in your children.

There are many things that can be done at home to prevent or reduce anxiety in children and adolescents.

Whilst a natural tendency when your child is anxious is to try to protect them, it can be more helpful to support them in taking small age-appropriate risks.

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The Extended Mind and the Coupling-Constitution Fallacy

vesalius brain

This was originally published on Philosophical Disquisitions

The extended mind hypothesis (EMH) holds that the mind isn’t all in the head. While it is no doubt true that the majority of our cognitive processes are situated in our brains, this need not be the case. For example, when performing the cognitive act of remembering, I may rely entirely on the internal activation of particular neural networks, or I could rely on some external prompt or storage device to assist my internal neural network. According to some philosophers, the extension of cognitive processes into the external environment is what gives rise to the EMH. As Andy Clark puts it, we are all “natural born cyborgs” – agents whose minds are jointly constituted by biological and technological materials.

Some philosophers dispute the EMH. Two of the most vociferous critics are Fred Adams and Kenneth Aizawa. They take particular umbrage at Clark’s claim about the possibility of joint-constitution.… Read the rest

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