Core Finding: Earth’s Frozen Center Formed a Billion Years Ago

"Jordens inre-numbers" by Original Mats Halldin Vectorization: Chabacano - . Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Commons.

Jordens inre-numbers” by Original Mats Halldin Vectorization: Chabacano – . Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Commons.

New research found that Earth’s inner core of solid iron “formed between 1 billion and 1.5 billion years ago.”

Tia Ghose via Live Science:

What’s more, the new findings suggest that Earth’s magnetic field, which is powered by the swirling flow of liquid iron surrounding the inner core, could continue going strong for quite a while, said study co-author Andy Biggin, a paleomagnetism researcher at the University of Liverpool in England. (Paleomagnetism is the study of the record of the Earth’s magnetic field in rocks, sediment or archaeological materials.)

“The theoretical model which best fits our data indicates that the core is losing heat more slowly than at any point in the last 4.5 billion years and that this flow of energy should keep the Earth’s magnetic field going for another billion years or more,” Biggin said in a statement.

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Egypt: What’s in a Name?

When Shakespeare wrote Romeo and Juliet, he pondered on the violent feud between the noble families of the Capulets and Montagues and their obsession with their names. This prompted the English bard to ask the rhetorical question: “What’s in a name?” He then gave his reply by saying, “That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet.”1 To an ancient Egyptian, however, such a concept would have been completely alien. A thing had to be called by its correct allocated name and no other, for it was only the correct name and its proper utterance that made vocal the soul of the object or person so named. Names became talismans, magical devices imbued with an invisible, immaterial, and immeasurable energy that, when correctly dispatched, would force the mind to unleash the most potent of emotions and the deepest of thoughts.2 An Egyptian would not, therefore, have hesitated to reply to Shakespeare’s question with the words “to lose my name is to lose my soul.Read the rest

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Explosions Rock Turkish Peace Rally; Police Block Ambulances Trying to Help Victims

Via Common Dreams:

Twin explosions outside Ankara’s main train station on Saturday morning killed at least 86 people and wounded up to 190 in an attack targeting a peace rally in Turkey’s capital city.

The peace rally and march was organized by unions, NGO’s and  the pro-Kurdish Peoples’ Democratic Party (HDP)  to protest against the conflict between the state and the Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK) in southeast Turkey.

A video caught the moment the first bomb went off.

A line of men and women were holding hands and singing as people milled in the background waving banners with anti-violence slogans, when the huge blast rocked the crowd.

Hundreds of protesters then clashed with police after officers blocked off a road keeping ambulances from aiding victims of this morning’s bombing.

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The Rothschilds sank the Titanic to set up the Federal Reserve

There’s a conspiracy theory doing the rounds that the Rothschilds sank the Titanic to set up the Federal Reserve, reports Business Insider Australia:

There’s a conspiracy theory that links the Rothschilds, the sinking of the Titanic, and the creation of the Federal Reserve.

On Friday I stumbled across a tweet sent in reply to a prominent finance parody account on Twitter. It featured the black-and-white image of three men and the Titanic.

Source: Twitter

Source: Twitter


The text on the photos named Benjamin Guggenheim, Isa Strauss (actual name Isador Straus), and David Astor as three wealthy men who died on the Titanic. So far, so correct. The men were all real and all wealthy.

Below each name it says “opposed new Federal Reserve Bank.” The Titanic’s sinking happened in 1912, and the opening of the Federal Reserve happened in 1913. Was the hint that their opposition to the Fed and their deaths were somehow linked?

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Quentin Tarantino Stars in Odd Japanese Commercial for Dog-Shaped Speakers (2009)

Well… I don’t really know what I expected.

Apparently this commercial features one of Japan’s most popular Ad Family, The Whites:

The father is a human in a dog’s body (for reasons “you’re too young to understand,” he once barked at his daughter), the son is a black American, and their maid is an alien incarnation of Tommy Lee Jones.

h/t Obscure Media on Reddit (by far the best subreddit).

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The City Where Residents Have Been Taking Mentally Ill People into Their Homes for Hundreds of Years


Lizzie Dearden writes at the Independent:

“Half of Geel is crazy, and the rest is half crazy,” runs a joke often told about the Belgian city of Geel.

On the surface, it may seem unremarkable with its pretty market square and river views, surrounded by the Antwerp countryside.

But wandering around its plazas and cafes, visitors may notice that some of the residents seem slightly “eccentric”, and with good reason.

The city is home to hundreds of mental health patients, who live not in psychiatric hospitals but with local families as part of a unique model of care dating back centuries.

Mike Jay, an author and cultural historian, has visited Geel to explore its unusual system.

Speaking to The Independent, he said the perception of “madness” as we know it does not exist.

“The people of Geel very studiously avoid all that language in a way I think is quite admirable,” Mr Jay added.

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The Case for Indigenous Peoples’ Day

CCDay– Eric Scott Pickard is an artist, activist, poet and writer. He is a Co-Founder of media collective Free Radical Media and a co-host of the Free Radical Media podcast, available via YouTube and Itunes

On 12 October of 1492, Cristobal Colon, known as Christopher Columbus, having made landfall on the island of Hispaniola, first encountered the native peoples of the Americas. Columbus was certainly not the first European to visit the Americas, and and perhaps not even the first visitor from the Old World, to visit North and South America since the closing of the land bridge in ancient times. He was, however, the man who opened the door in modern times to vast new lands, full of new plants, animals, and people, and the effect of 12 October, 1492 on the Americas cannot be understated.

The narrative in Western, and especially American history books is mostly one of vague allusions and rhetoric: a story of exploration, strangers in a strange land, a journey fraught with danger, leading to the discovery of a whole “New World”.… Read the rest

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Christian cult that predicted Wednesday’s world annihilation will study Bible for revised deadline

Last week we posted the story of Chris McCann, the evangelist Christian who published multiple articles about “Why October 7, 2015 is the Likely End of the World.” Now he’s going back to the scriptures to come up with a better date, reports the Guardian via Raw Story. Will they never learn?

The leader of a Christian group who claimed that the world would end on Wednesday has admitted his prediction was “incorrect”.

William Blake's The Day of Judgment printed in 1808 to illustrate the Robert Blair's poem "The Grave"

William Blake’s The Day of Judgment printed in 1808 to illustrate the Robert Blair’s poem “The Grave”


Chris McCann, head of the eBible fellowship, warned that the planet would be destroyed “with fire” on 7 October. This did not happen.

“Since it is now 8 October it is now obvious that we were incorrect regarding the world’s ending on the 7th,” McCann said.

McCann originally told the Guardian that by Thursday the world would be “gone forever: annihilated”.

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When Exxon’s Business Ambition Collided with Climate Change Under a Distant Sea

EXXON Gas station @ Amistad Lake National Recreation Area
Neela Banerjee & Lisa Song write at InsideClimate News:

In 1980, as Exxon Corp. set out to develop one of the world’s largest deposits of natural gas, it found itself facing an unfamiliar risk: the project would emit immense amounts of carbon dioxide, adding to the looming threat of climate change.

The problem cropped up shortly after Exxon signed a contract with the Indonesian state oil company to exploit the Natuna gas field in the South China Sea—big enough to supply the blossoming markets of Japan, Taiwan and Korea with liquefied natural gas into the 21st century.

Assessing the environmental impacts, Exxon Research and Engineering quickly identified Natuna’s greenhouse gas problem. The reservoir was contaminated with much more carbon dioxide than normal. It would have to be disposed of somehow—and simply venting it into the air could have serious consequences, Exxon’s experts warned.

Exxon’s dawning realization that carbon dioxide and the greenhouse effect posed a danger to the world collided with the company’s fossil fuel ambitions.

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