2012

Man, I always thought this would happen to Jupiter in 2010. Claire Connelly had a different sci-fi film in mind, as she writes on News.com.au: It’s the ultimate experience for Star Wars…


Having produced a feature-length documentary film and edited a book on the topic, I thought I’d interviewed or researched most of the important public figures who have something interesting or informative to…


NASA has named 2012 the ‘most absurd science fiction film of all time,’ but what would you expect from the Hollywood director known as “the master of disaster”? For a ‘definitive guide…



The fearmongers wishing for something, anything, to happen in 2012 have seized on the next peak in the cyclical activity experienced by our sun. AFP reports that an upswing starts next year,…








Or maybe it’s already happened.  LiveScience reports: It’s a good news/bad news situation for believers in the 2012 Mayan apocalypse. The good news is that the Mayan “Long Count” calendar may not…


One of the most likely ‘Earth Apocalypse’ scenarios among the many bandied about by 2012 alarmists is that a “Near Earth Object” — as asteroids, meteors and other space junk that might…


2012: Time for Change presents an optimistic alternative to apocalyptic doom and gloom. Directed by Emmy Award nominee João Amorim, the film follows my quest for a new paradigm that integrates the archaic wisdom of tribal cultures with the scientific method. As conscious agents of evolution, we can redesign post-industrial society on ecological principles to make a world that works for all. Rather than breakdown and barbarism, 2012 heralds the birth of a regenerative planetary culture where collaboration replaces competition, where exploration of psyche and spirit becomes the new cutting edge, replacing the sterile materialism that has pushed our world to the brink. The film features Sting, Ellen Page, David Lynch, Gilberto Gil, and many other artists and visionaries.

The film opens in New York this weekend. Apologies if you don’t live in the area – we will soon offer video on demand and DVDs for sale. You can also work with us to organize a screening where you live…





The LA Times profiles Christopher Nyerges, founder of the School of Self-Reliance and an expert on how to survive on food he finds in the urban wild:

Nyerges, who has been teaching for more than 30 years, says that it isn’t uncommon for hard-core survivalists to take his class, as well as people with end-of-the-world-related fears. “There have been individuals who have been seriously upset about things over the years. During Y2K they were petrified; now I get a lot of that with the 2012 baloney,” he says, referring to what some believe is the Mayan calendar’s end date.

“I tell people that society is not going to change, only the individual can change and that’s the source of calm that comes from true self-reliance,” he continues. “I’m convinced I will never go hungry, I’ll never be homeless, I’ll never be broke…


Well that’s what astrologer-cum-stockpicker Arch Crawford claims anyway, reported by Peter Brimelow at MarketWatch: Crawford predicts “ALL HELL BREAKS LOOSE”–beginning, as a matter of fact, on Monday July 26, 2010. …the opening…



Why don’t humans ever learn from their mistakes of the past? Is it ‘different this time’? The New York Times reports from Guatemala on the re-deforestation of the homeland of the Maya:…


This unique dialogue brings together two leading counterculture thinkers, Daniel Pinchbeck author of 2012: The Return of Quetzalcoatl, Toward 2012: Perspectives on the Next Age, and Breaking Open the Head, and Graham Hancock author of Fingerprints of the Gods, Supernatural and most recently the fantasy adventure novel Entangled. Pinchbeck and Hancock discuss the implications of the Mayan Calendar “end-times” date 2012 which Hancock first drew to the attention of his readers in Fingerprints of the Gods published in 1995.

Hancock’s evidence for a great lost civilisation wiped out in a global cataclysm 12,500 years ago is explored in depth…




Author’s note:  What follows is a (perhaps) pessimistic rumination on 2012.  It is the first of two essays, the second intending toward optimism. There are these rumors—perhaps you have heard them—rumors of…


2012 Time For a ChangeIn the first episode of Evolver the Podcast we have conversations with both Daniel Pinchbeck and Joao Amorim on their upcoming collaborative effort 2012 Time For a Change.

Daniel Pinchbeck has written two books (Breaking Open the Head, 2012 Return of Quetzalcoatl) and helped start both Reality Sandwich (the leading online magazine in consciousness culture) and Evolver.net. Evolver has now started to focus on building an actual social movement to produce real change in the world.

Joao Amorim has done a number of short animation films, such as the award winning short Don’t Get Charged Up. He also worked as the animation director on Chicago 10. 2012 Time For a Change is his first venture as director of a full length feature film.