Tag Archives | 40th Anniversary

40 Years of Jaws


I’ve been posting about the 35th anniversary of The Shining over the last several weeks, but I thought it might be better to wait until it was officially summertime to post about the 40th anniversary of Jaws. The summer movie as we know it today didn’t exist until Jaws devoured box offices all summer long in 1975. Along with Star Wars‘ release in 1977, the pair of films changed the entire calendar of film releasing, creating the template for the modern blockbuster and put an end to the New Hollywood movement that made both of the movies possible in the first place.

Besides the game-changing industry impact of Jaws, the story of the making of the film was nearly as treacherous, desperate and paranoia-inducing as the plot of the film. From shooting on the open ocean, to doubts about the inexperienced director, Steven Spielberg, to the malfunctioning mechanical monster, it’s a wonder the movie ever made it to the screen.… Read the rest

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Pink Floyd and Tom Stoppard Celebrate 40 Years of Dark Side

British playwright Tom Stoppard has announced that he’ll be producing a new broadcast for BBC Radio 2. Inspired by and featuring the music from the Pink Floyd classic Dark Side of the Moon, the long-simmering project will hit the airwaves this August -just in time to celebrate the 1973 release’s 40th anniversary.

Here’s what The Guardian has to say:

The play, called Dark Side, was described by Radio 2’s head of music, Jeff Smith, as a “dramatic examination of themes including conflict, greed and madness”.

The project has the blessing of Pink Floyd’s frontman, David Gilmour, who said he had read the script and found it fascinating.

Stoppard, whose plays include Arcadia and Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, is a long-time Pink Floyd fan. His 2006 play Rock’n’Roll, which also starred Sewell, featured haunting allusions to the band’s founder, the late Syd Barrett, and was described by one critic as a “deeply moving memorial to the great lost leader of British pop”.… Read the rest

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