Tag Archives | 4th Amendment

Molested: My Unlawful Encounter With TSA

3253293070_molestedbytsa_xlargeDid you know you have every right to refuse not only the naked body scanners, but any invasive pat down of your physical body?  You do not have to consent to such violations of your natural rights (which supersede political rights).  Intrepid activist Clint Richardson recounts his molestation at the hands of the TSA and his plans to hold accountable and sue every officer who acted outside of the authority granted by law as individuals.

As I entered the line for the security and “screening” area of the Salt Lake City Airport on April 27th, 2013, I decided that it was time to stand up for my natural rights as a lawful man. I decided not to offer my willing consent that any TSA officer might presume as to my willingness or legal duty to be either irradiated in a full-body scanner or be patted down by any agent of government or its security guards (police) without first being shown probable cause or reasonable suspicion that I have committed a regulated commercial or criminal act, and to show any law that gave that officer or security guard authority to do so despite my lack of voluntary consent.

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Michigan Police Device Can Reveal Drivers’ Phone Data, Texts and Pictures

Photo: Cellebrite

Photo: Cellebrite

CNET reports:

The Michigan State Police have a handful of portable machines called “extraction devices” that have the potential to download personal information from motorists they pull over, and the ACLU would like to know more about them.

The devices, sold by a company called Cellebrite, can download text messages, photos, video, and even GPS data from most brands of cell phones. The handheld machines have various interfaces to work with different models and can even bypass security passwords and access some information.

The problem, as the ACLU sees it, is that accessing a citizen’s private phone information when there’s no probable cause could create a violation of the Constitution’s 4th Amendment, which protects us against unreasonable searches and seizures.

To that end, it’s petitioning the MSP to turn over information about its use of the devices under the Freedom of Information Act. The MSP said it’s happy to comply, that is, if the ACLU provides them with a processing fee in excess of $500,000.

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