Tag Archives | Adventure

For Science: Man will live alone on iceberg until it melts

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via Oddity Central:

In a bid to get people to take climate change more seriously, Italian adventurer Alex Bellini is going to live on an iceberg until it melts. He plans to take on the challenge in the spring of 2015, on an iceberg in Greenland. He expects that he’ll have to live there alone for at least eight to twelve months.

Alex, who is now based in the UK, plans to live inside a survival capsule while on the iceberg. “Survival capsules are sort of floating Kevlar saucers, four meters in diameter, which are used as lifeboats on oil platforms,” he explained. “I will live in the capsule on the iceberg until it melts – which generally happens within eight months – or up to a maximum of one year.”

“Then, I’ll go adrift in the Atlantic Ocean, inside my capsule again, until I wash ashore.” He plans to carry 300 kilos of dehydrated food and electronic equipment along with him.

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Terence McKenna: Butterfly Hunter

Klea_McKenna_ButterflyHunter-1

PIC: Klea McKenna (C) -click to see more images and learn about the book.

This month we remember the late, great Terence McKenna. The author, lecturer, scientist and philosopher was the heir apparent to Timothy Leary, bringing more lucidity, humor and insight to spreading the gospel of the psychedelic experience than anyone has been able to muster since we lost McKenna to brain cancer in April, 2000.

While it’s always nice to recall our heroes in an online post, I mention McKenna to point to the remembrance created by his daughter. Klea McKenna’s The Butterfly Hunter is a gorgeous photography volume that documents her dad’s butterfly collection as she explains in the introduction of her book:

For four years, beginning in 1969, my father lived out an unlikely fantasy: he became a butterfly collector. (We use the term collector but that is just a euphemism for hunter.) Butterfly hunting is a conflicted activity, a desire for beauty and a small act of violence, both justified by science.

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Into Haiti’s Zombie Underground

Screen Shot 2013-11-03 at 9.52.03 AMWriter Mischa Berlinski traveled to Haiti in search of zombies. Epic Magazine has the story.

Via Epic:

About a month after I arrived in Jérémie, a rumor swept through town that a deadly zombie was on the loose. This zombie, it was said, could kill by touch alone. The story had enough authority that schools closed. The head of the local secret society responsible for the management of the zombie population was asked to investigate. Later that week, Monsieur Roswald Val, having conducted a presumably thorough inquiry, made an announcement on Radio Lambi: There was nothing to fear; all his zombies were accounted for.

Shortly after that incident, I started taking Creole lessons from a motorcycle-taxi driver named Lucner Delzor. Delzor was married with four children, but he kept a mistress on the other side of town. He told me that he had never so much as drunk a glass of water at his mistress’s house for fear she might lace his food with love powder.

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Explorer Rory Nugent on The DisinfoCast with Matt Staggs

Rory Nugent | The DisinfoCast with Matt Staggs: Episode 13

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It's Lucky Episode 13 for The DisinfoCast, and to bring a little perspective to what it means to have "bad luck," adventurer and writer Rory Nugent opens up the show with his true account of being lost at sea for five days with nothing but a couple of candy bars and his own urine to drink. After an experience like that no one would have blamed Nugent if he never left his home again, but instead he took off for India in search for a rare pink-headed duck and then to the Congo to find Mokele-Mbembe, the legendary last dinosaur. After you're done with the show, visit Rory and learn more about his books (The Search for the Pink Headed Dinosaur, Drums Along the Congo, Down at the Docks) at www.rorynugent.com.
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Theme Park Offers Experience Of An Illegal Border Crossing

The undisputed highlight of Parque EcoAlberto, a nature and water park located in formerly sleepy El Alberto, Mexico, is an immersive experience called the "Caminata Nocturna" simulating the clandestine crossing of the U.S. border. The grueling adventure lasts up to eight hours and involves a journey through "mud, tunnels, canyons, poisonous plants, snakes, and spiders", with actors appearing as "coyote" human traffickers and U.S. border patrol agents. EcoAlberto has been accused of belittling the deadly perils faced by actual migrants, but perhaps deserve credit for offering a window into this world:
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Vice’s Hamilton Morris Interviewed on Hallucinogenic Fish

Shiny FishVia Technoccult:

In 2006 two men cooked and ate a fish which they had caught in the Western Mediterranean. Minutes after ingesting the fish frightening visual and auditory hallucinations began to overcome them. These intense visions lasted 36 hours. The fish they had caught was a Sarpa Salpa. A species of Sea Bream which is commonly found off the coast of South Africa and Malta and can induce icthyoallyeinotoxism, a condition also known as hallucinogenic fish poisoning.

I recently learned that Vice columnist Hamilton Morris is assembling a team to capture and analyze a live sample of Sarpa Salpa. Morris is a writer and filmmaker and expert in anything psychoactive. In his column for Vice, Hamilton’s Pharmacopeia, he mixes his subjective experiences with insights into pharmacology, neurology and chemistry. In one column he traveled to the Amazonian jungle to have the secretions of a “shamanic” frog burnt into his arm.

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Cryptotourism: On The Trail Of A 40-Foot Anaconda

A common anaconda. Photo: he (CC)

A common (non-giant) anaconda. Photo: he (CC)

Joshua Foer of Slate.com reports:

PACAYA SAMIRIA, Peru—Of all the crazy mythical creatures that starry-eyed monster hunters have gone in search of—the Yeti, Sasquatch, Nessie, the chupacabra—South America’s giant anaconda would seem to be the least implausible. None of the Amazon’s early explorers dared emerge from the forest without a harrowing tale of a face-to-face encounter with a humongous snake. In the 19th and early 20th centuries, it was practically a requirement of the jungle adventure genre. English explorer Percy Fawcett (of Lost City of Z fame) reportedly shot a 62-foot anaconda in 1907 while on a surveying mission in western Brazil. Cândido Rondon, who led Teddy Roosevelt’s famous journey down the River of Doubt, claimed to have measured a 38-footer “in the flesh.” In 1933, a 100-foot serpent was said to have been machine-gunned by officials from the Brazil-Colombia Boundary Commission. According to witnesses, four men together couldn’t lift its head.

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