Advertising


Buzzfeed has a collection of magazine advertising from the 1950s through 1970s run by the American Sugar Association’s PR division, Sugar Information. For decades sugar was aggressively advertised to consumers (specifically women)…



An eerie and fascinating commercial of the moment from European banking and mortgage giant Santander acknowledges how corporate messages have become a deluge pervading our lives. There is no resistance. Via Potlatch:

It is one of the most unsettling pieces of film that I’ve ever seen, reducing advertising to a set of blank and bland facts, to be recited out of the mouths of an apparently arbitrary collection of sports stars. What are the celebrities doing in other people’s houses?

The ordinary people, trying to go about their days in peace and privacy, exude a sad resignation that capitalism now drops (real? hallucinatory?) celebrities into their bathrooms and kitchens, to talk at them uninvited. Is this a warning of some kind?


How everything is co-opted: the German fashion line Blush uses Russian feminist protest icons Pussy Riot, currently sitting in prison labor camps, to sell sheer panties. Via Ads of the World:

On the first anniversary of the Pussy Riot concert in the Cathedral of Christ the Savior, the Berlin based Lingerie label blush supports the free pussy riot movement with a sexy protest march through icy Moscow (-15° C).



The most surprising commercial show during last night’s Superbowl had to be that for the “Church” of Scientology. Classified as a cult in various countries (and as a criminal organization in Belgium), one wonders why the CBS television network decided to sell one of it’s precious advertising spots to such a controversial entity when demand exceeded supply and all spots were sold well in advance of the game. Here’s the rather dull ad for those of you who didn’t watch the game or were not in a market where it aired:


If you want to understand our culture, watch our commercials. Via Salon, Michael Shaw writes:

With the West in an endless struggle in the Middle East not just for resources but mindshare, we see the Coke bottle — the symbol of globalization and American commercialism — sitting there in the hot sand, the object of desire for, first of all, a hapless Gulf prince/camel jockey. Resonating with [the looming] immigration debate, we then have a Hispanic desperado evoking the desert as if the province of thirsty Mexicans looking north.

It’s funny but not-so-funny when you consider that what America has to offer is, in fact, a mirage. What the ad people realize I’m sure is that, after more than a decade in Iraq and Afghanistan, the idea of “quenching” — no matter how much you “put down” the Arabs and Islamists — couldn’t be more ironic.







The Denmark-based multinational Danske Bank is one of the world’s largest, with assets worth about $600 billion. Its new marketing campaign, fascinating in much the same fashion as a train wreck, is based around the slogans “Occupy” and “A New Normal”:

The strategy is intended to restore trust in the Bank and ensure that we live up to our new vision of being “Recognised as the most trusted financial partner.” In order to reach that objective, we must set new standards for banking operations.




It might not quite be The Innocence of Muslims, but the Dr. Pepper advertisement shown at right has creationists all hot and bothered. Via TIME: If you’re in the mood to draw…