Aging

Charlie The Smoking ChimpVia Reuters:

JOHANNESBURG — A chimpanzee once hooked on smoking by visitors offering it cigarettes has died at a South African zoo at the relatively advanced age of 52, officials said on Wednesday.
“He appears to have died of old age,” said municipal spokesman Qondile Khedama. An autopsy will be conducted to determine the exact cause of death.

“Charlie the smoking chimp” used to put two fingers to his mouth to mimic smoking and reach out with his other hand to bum cigarette butts from visitors at Bloemfontein Zoo. But when videos of him puffing away circulated globally a few years ago, zoo officials moved to cut off the supply of smokes.

The nickname stuck even though the cigarette habit faded.

The life expectancy for chimps in the wild is about 15 years and only 7 percent of wild chimps live past 40, a Harvard University report published in 2007 said.


There has always been an interest in remaining young: immortality in myths, the fountain of youth, plastic surgery. People have continued to search for a means of stopping the aging process to…


German neuroscientists have made a breakthrough in “age-related cognitive decline” which often begins in your late 40s (especially declarative memory – the ability to recall facts and experiences)!

Their new study identifies a genetic “switch” for the cluster of learning and memory genes which cause memory impairment in aging mice. By injecting an enzyme, the team “flipped” the switch to its on position for older mice, giving them the memory and learning performance they’d enjoyed when they were young.