Tag Archives | Alan Moore

Betrayal, Freedom and Justice: Forces of Order, Why V Embraced Anarchy (excerpts from Alan Moore and David LLoyd’s ‘V for Vendetta’)

via chycho

V_for_vendettax

Without a doubt, if you were to ask any comic book aficionado to put together a top five comic book creators list, Alan Moore would be in every list. Some even consider him to be the greatest comic book writer of all time.

“When waiting for a train at London’s Victoria Station in 1984, Gaiman noticed a copy of Swamp Thing written by Alan Moore, and carefully read it. Moore’s fresh and vigorous approach to comics had such an impact on Gaiman that he would later write; ‘that was the final straw, what was left of my resistance crumbled. I proceeded to make regular and frequent visits to London’s Forbidden Planet shop to buy comics’.” – Neil Gaiman: Journalism, early writings, and literary influences

Neil Gaiman – 3 books that have changed my life

Alan Moore has touched many hearts, and his creation that has influenced more people than any other is his masterpiece ‘V for Vendetta’, which he co-created with David LLoyd.… Read the rest

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Grant Morrison – Perdurabo

PIC: pinguin (CC)

PIC: pinguin (CC)

The ruthlessly eloquent condemnation of Grant Morrison, unleashed by Alan Moore earlier this year, still seems to be ringing through the mediasphere. Dangerous Minds sums it all up quite succinctly with “Alan Moore really hates Grant Morrison’s guts.”

One of the more enchanting rhetorical spells Moore casts against his fellow scribe, taken from Pádraig Ó Méalóid’s interview, is when he refers to Morrison’s “herpes-like persistence.” Which he intends as an insult, one would assume, but unfolds as an illuminating insight into what makes Morrison’s work resonate.

Persistence! Through all manner of obstacle and difficulty. It reminds me very much of Aleister Crowley’s magical motto: “Perdurabo” a latin word which is generally translated as “I will endure to the end.”

I for one would like to express my sincere gratitude for Grant Morrison’s herpes-like persistence, long may it endure!

Alan Moore, of course, still totally rules, and I very much look forward to his participation in Daisy Eris Campbell’s dramatic adaptation of Robert Anton Wilson’s Cosmic Trigger.Read the rest

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Guy Fawkes Day: Why ‘V for Vendetta’ is More Important Than Ever

Rabid Fish (CC)

Rabid Fish (CC)

Did you remember, remember the Fifth of November, disinfonauts? Well just in case you forgot, that means it’s Guy Fawkes Day. Michael Shammas tells us why Guy Fawkes and its modern day movie iteration V for Vendetta is more important than ever, at PolicyMic:

Warning: major spoilers below

Every Nov. 5 for the past few years, I’ve sat back with a few friends to watch V for Vendetta. While ostensibly we did this to commemorate Guy Fawkes Day, which marks the anniversary of British revolutionary Guy Fawkes’s attempt to blow up the Parliament in 1605, we really did it because everyone else was doing it, and we were bored.

But this Nov. 5, I expect I’ll be a bit more alert when I watch V. Why? Because the movie’s lessons are more important now than ever before.

Originally a graphic novel by Alan MooreV for Vendetta is set in a dystopian England where a revolutionary wearing a Guy Fawkes mask sets out to destroy a fascist party called Norsefire by convincing citizens to stand up and rule themselves.

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KALI-YUGA: An Interview with Graphic Novelist Benton Rooks

I digitally “sat down” on my flight from LA to interview Benton Rooks, an old friend and author of the exciting new indie graphic novel, KALI-YUGA:
kaliyuga01

“KALI-YUGA is an epic dark fantasy/sci-fi graphic novel trilogy concerning the fate of the heroic, time traveling wizard named Abaraiis, who is born as a 500 year old man.”

As the name suggests, Benton’s artistic directions implicitly explore esoteric and mythological dimensions of our time. I wanted to hear more about how these ideas played into the creation of KALI-YUGA.

Here is our conversation.

Note! My readers should also see Benton’s Kickstarter campaign for KALI-YUGA. If the spirit so moves you, consider donating a little something to support this fantastic indie art project:

KALI-YUGA: Issue 1

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JJ: How do you situate yourself, as an artist, in a hyper-mediated, rampantly technologized time? From the looks of it, KALI-YUGA explores both mythology and some epic-sized science fiction.Read the rest

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Superman is a Rocker: Robert Pollard and the Third Mind

PenetratingAbout six months ago, I spontaneously started contemplating the nature of using the cut up technique popularized by William S. Burroughs and Brion Gysin to tap into what they referred to as the “third mind”. This automatic introspection occurred while I was perusing through the incredibly brilliant re-assembled art books of Robert Pollard. Anyone who knows me knows that I’ve been a Guided By Voices nut for quite some time, but I’ve never honestly written about this particular obsession or where it stemmed from before, and so I had an idea of combining these two things into one utterly bizarre piece of music writing.

Vivian, the editor of Redefine didn’t really get it, and neither did I consciously, but it was something I felt compelled to hash out nonetheless. Truth be told, I just don’t think any other writer did the band’s 2012 reunion albums justice, or had accused them of practicing a sort of unconscious witchcraft for that matter.… Read the rest

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Peter Bebergal Interviews Alan Moore on Creativity, Magic and More

2158181-alan_mooreToo Much to Dream author Peter Bebergal recently interviewed legendary comic book author and practicing magician Alan Moore for The Believer magazine. I think that disinfonauts will find it an entertaining read.

The Believer:

BLVR: Where do you think human consciousness fits into that? Is it somehow separate from it?

AM: If time is an illusion, then all movement and change are also illusions. So the only thing that gives us the illusion of movement and change and events and time is the fact that our consciousness is moving through this mass along the time axis. If you imagine it as a strip of celluloid, each of those individual cells is motionless. If they each represent a moment, they’re unchanging. They’re not going anywhere, but as the projector beam of our consciousness passes across them, it provides the illusion of movement, and narrative and cause and effect and circumstances.

BLVR: You also believe that we can change the aperture of that projector through various processes like magic, or other ways of shaping consciousness.

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Alan Moore and Psychogeography

Picture: Karen Karnak (CC)

Picture: Karen Karnak (CC)

Alan Moore interviews are always worth reading. Here he discusses psychogeography as it applies to various of his works.

via Reasons I Do Not Dance:

What exactly, in your not unlimited understanding, is Psychogeography?

In its simplest form I understand psychogeography to be a straightforward acknowledgement that we, as human beings, embed aspects of our psyche…memories, associations, myth and folklore…in the landscape that surrounds us. On a deeper level, given that we do not have direct awareness of an objective reality but, rather, only have awareness of our own perceptions, it would seem to me that psychogeography is possibly the only kind of geography that we can actually inhabit.

What books and writers ignited your interest in psychogeography?

The author that first introduced me to the subject was the person I regard as being its contemporary master, namely Iain Sinclair, with his early work Lud Heat.

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2013 – Year of the Witch (Phantasmaphile Edition) – Interview with Pam Grossman

The story of how the work of Pam Grossman and her fantastic Phantasmaphile blog came to my attention quite predictably reeks of divine witchery. Despite being a practicing Occultist for 7 years, I somehow remained completely oblivious to the fact that one of the premier Occult book conventions in the world had been going down right beneath my nose in my hometown for four years. When I finally got hip, I remembered, then forgot, then remembered again at the last minute. Unfortunately, by that point I’d accidentally scheduled some family shit on the first day of the conference that I couldn’t easily duck out of. So I only caught day 2. It started at like 10 in the morning and I had to bus down, so I actually planned on skipping the first presentation as I’d stayed up late the night before. Through the course of that night, in some secret state of deranged hypnagogia, a voice came through the ether proclaiming: “they fucked up the order.” I didn’t honestly know what this meant, but I woke up early the next morning at complete random. I was just lying there...
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Alan Moore’s New Film, ‘Jimmy’s End’ and the IS-ness of Being Who I AM

I feel like a virgin walking into a cosmological gang-bang. My world view has been destroyed to make way for a new construct.

I had a dream that I inhabited a construction supply warehouse and was picking up materials for my new cosmology. I picked up understanding, gnosis and some new pipes for a free flowing system connected to the logos. I awoke from the metaphor to realize that this dream told me that my worldview, and even who I AM, creates the landscape of my reality. “Blame it on last night’s whiskey,” I said and returned to sleep, but the same idea came again in another way: This time, I was in an art studio that my present self does not yet own. Here I made with paint and canvas my own cosmos. Where previously it was a construct, now it was a work of art.

In Alan Moore’s first film, Jimmy’s End, Jimmy visits an unexpected place in which the big show of creation happens, performed by the great “I AM”.… Read the rest

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Alan Moore Interview

Picture: Loz Pycock (CC)

Here’s an interview I did with Alan Moore a few years back:

http://thecultofnick.libsyn.com/alan-moore-interviews

I think it features the only full audio version of his demonic possession story which has gained a certain level of notoriety in occult circles because, as you’d expect, it’s really well told.

Alan Moore is the reason I first gave the world of occultism any serious attention and so I selfishly draw him into the subject in quite some detail once we’ve chatted about comics.

The podcast also features an interview, recorded on the same day, regarding Mr Moore’s dislike of film conversions of his work. It wasn’t possible to broadcast this interview in its full form so it features like this here for the first time.

I hope my fellow Disinfonaughts will forgive me such a blatant plug, I try to put up as many interesting stories as possible on here so every now and then it’s nice to push something like this.… Read the rest

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