Tag Archives | Alan Watts

Alan Watts

Alan_Wattsdisinformation author (Create Your Own Religion: A How-To Book without Instructions) and all-round badass academic Daniele Bolelli has written a primer on Alan Watts for Datsusara:

Those who can’t resist the urge to take popular heroes down a notch will tell you that Alan Watts was an alcoholic and was addicted to nicotine. They will tell you that he was a victim of his own excesses. They will tell you that he sometimes mischaracterized Buddhism and Taoism, and turned them into hippie fantasies. In saying this, they wouldn’t be entirely wrong, but at the same time they would be completely missing the point. Nobody says Alan Watts was a saint. Watts himself never claimed it, nor would he have been interested in it. What he craved was an intense life, not a perfect one. And those who can’t appreciate his philosophical genius, just because the good man had some issues, miss out on the contributions of one of the most brilliant and influential minds of the 20th century.

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Alan Watts Talks About The Upanishads

Many times in past comments here I have mentioned the Upanishads.  Today one of my Disinfonaut friends, Matt Prather, sent me this.  I hadn’t “seen” Matt here since February or so, but his reappearance was the end(?) of a chain of synchronicity filled events.  As I watched this film this morning, and thought about all this, I realized I should post it.

Alan Watts – Way Beyond Seeking

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Introducing Alan Watts?

It's unlikely this will be an introduction for most Disnfonaughts but as the community grows it's worth welcoming newcomers with a few of the basics. Trust me when I say he'll be useful to you if you're unaware of his work[1]. Open Culture has highlighted the arrival of the complete 1959 series of television shows which helped to make his name in the US. If you're familliar with his work you'll have skipped this, prepared yourself a good fat tasty portion of Zen and already be watching the master weave some 'classic' spells. Open culture writes:
The British-born interpreter and popularizer of East Asian Buddhist thought generated most of his media in the San Francisco of the 1950s and 1960s, and his televised lectures, produced for local public station KQED, must have offered many a San Franciscan their very first glimpse of Zen. Now that episodes of his series Eastern Wisdom and Modern Life have made it to YouTube (season one, season two), you can see for yourself that Watts’ then-cutting-edge delivery of this ancient wisdom remains entertaining, informative, and striking in its clarity. Begin with the introductory episode above, “Man and Nature,” in which Watts calmly lays out his observations of the ill effects of Westerners’ having grown to distrust their human instincts. FULL STORY HERE.
[1] Early rumours surrounding The Discordian Holy text "Principia Discordia" placed him as its author. This speaks to the clout he had in the US spiritual counter culture. Nick Margerrison
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