Tag Archives | Alejandro Jodorowsky

Jodorowsky 1.0

Jodo

Nashville, TN is experiencing a Alejandro Jodorowsky renaissance this month with the Belcourt Theatre’s screenings of some of the auteur’s most important works, leading up to the local premiere of his new film, Dance of Reality.

My fellow local film writers and I all respect the master’s outlandish visuals, his passion for the surreal and his esoteric spiritual explorations, but, of course, his movies aren’t for everyone. After last week’s screening of The Holy Mountain I kept thinking about the film — I’ve watched it many times and this most recent viewing was the second time I’d seen it on the big screen. I came away wondering if I’d seen any other films that paved the way for Jodorowsky, and while early surrealist cinema certainly deserves a nod, if you want to know where Jodo’s roots really dig in, you have to look to the stage, not the screen.

Here’s what the Mutantspace site has to say about Jodorowsky’s Melodrama Sacramental performance piece from 1965…

Alejandro Jodorowsky‘s ‘Melodrama Sacramentral’ was a happening presented by his group, The Panic Movement at the Paris Festival of Free Expression in 1965.Read the rest

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Jodorowsky on Tarot and Family

A Jodorowsy LR

[disinfo ed.'s note: the following is an excerpt from The Dance of Reality: A Psychomagical Autobiography by Alejandro Jodorowsky.]

I began my Tarot reading sessions at the same time that I was writing the comic The Incal for Moebius. The more I progressed with the readings, the more I noticed that all problems have their roots in the family tree. To examine a person’s difficulties is to enter into the psychological atmosphere of his or her family. I realized that we are marked by the psychomental universe of our families. We are marked by their characteristics, but also by their insane ideas, their negative feelings, their inhibited desires, and their destructive acts. The father and mother project all their phantoms onto the expected infant. They want to see him or her do what they themselves could not experience or accomplish. Thus, we assume a personality that is not our own, but comes from one or more members of our emotional environment.… Read the rest

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Documentary Filmmaker Frank Pavich on Alejandro Jodorowsky Hallucinatory Take on ‘Dune’

PIC: Jodorowsky's Dune (C)

PIC: Jodorowsky’s Dune (C)

Visionary director Alejandro Jodorowsky’s (El Topo, The Holy Mountain) proposed treatment for Frank Herbert’s Dune is the stuff of legends: The psychedelic sci-fi freakout that could have been. It has been called “the greatest film never made,” and now documentary filmmaker Frank Pavich tells the tale in his film Jodorowsky’s Dune. He recently spoke with NPR’s Scott Simon.

Via NPR:

On the team Jodorowsky gathered for the film

He had a team of artists, which he dubbed his “spiritual warriors.” [There] was a French comic book artist named Moebius [the pseudonym of Jean Giraud] … a British sci-fi artist named Chris Foss … the Swiss surrealist H. R. Giger … and there was a gentleman named Dan O’Bannon who was going to come in and do special effects. And this team of spiritual warriors worked with Jodorowsky for a good two years in Paris.

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Alejandro Jodorowsky On Creating Your Soul Through The Tarot

Legendary surrealist filmmaker, artist, magician, and tarot card expert Alejandro Jodorowsky reveals how the tarot allows the nature of reality to unfold:
If you use the tarot to see the future, you become a conman, a charlatan. For me the tarot was something more serious. It was a deep psychological search. When you see the tarot, you see that chance exists, that synchronicity exists, everything is linked. When you deeply enter that dimension that i call the dance of reality the world dances around you and gives you what you seek. We need something to help us pass on to another dimension. The creation of an androgynous thought that leads to a superior mind. When you are linked to everyone there are no enemies.
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Jodorowsky’s Lost Film

Tusk1980 wasn’t a great year for Alejandro Jodorowsky. Having just barely survived the end of the 1970’s when the film that was to be his magnum opus — an adaptation of Frank Herbert’s classic Dune — fell apart for the final time, Jodo was anxious to get back to work. He agreed to make a children’s film.

At first, the idea of the anarchist auteur making a movie for kids might sound odd, but Tusk (Poo Lorn L’Elephant) told a tale about the shared fate of an English girl and an Indian elephant. The story had the kind of spiritual overtones that Jodo had marshaled so furiously in The Holy Mountain and the coming of age tale shared some similarities with El Topo — even the Indian locations promised exotic settings that surely inspired the director.

Alas, a classic it was not meant to be. Tusk is roundly criticized by those who’ve been able to see it — the only home release is an un-subtitled French language version on VHS.… Read the rest

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Jammin’ Jodorowsky

Alejandro Jodorowsky is one of my favorite artists of all time. One reason why I love this guy's work so much is that he does it all: writer, director, actor, mime, magician, comic book author, tarot card expert. He's completely brilliant and hilarious, and both of those traits are present in his films - which I highly recommend despite the fact that Jodo certainly isn't for everybody. Readers of this blog are no doubt familiar with Jodorowsky's Western cum vision quest El Topo, but, for me, the director reaches his cinematic summit - so far - at the top of The Holy Mountain. Without question one of the most bizarre and visually stunning films anyone will ever see, critics who dismiss the plot as a mish-mash of New Age flotsam can be forgiven for not recognizing the gold Jodorowsky hid in the excrement. Check out one of The Holy Mountain's most famous scenes (NSFW):
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Poetic Re-Evolution: Reality Sandwich Interviews Jodorowsky and Montadon

Sophie Pinchetti interviews filmmaker and artist Alejandro Jodorowsky and his wife and artist Pascale Montandon for Reality Sandwich (originally from the magazine, THE THIRD EYE):

Created by four hands, a third artist is born. The artistic communion, first drawn by Jodorowsky and then infused with colour by Montandon, levitates between fantasy, tragedy, humor and spirituality — all of which recall the essence of mysticism and symbolic theatrics in Jodorowsky’s films.
Sophie Pinchetti:  Your collaborative work seems to converge around spirituality. Where does your interest come from? 

Alejandro Jodorowsky: Spirituality is abstract. True art leads you to the discovery of your spirit. It’s not the quest, it’s the application, the practice of spirituality.

Pascale Montandon: In the same way I was simply going to say that it is a way of being in the world, a way of living. And obviously when you do an artistic work, the material of work is oneself.

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Legendary Showman Turns Shaman

Jodorowsky giving a speech on spirituality. Photo: Ana Bolívar (www.anabolivar.com)

Jodorowsky giving a speech on spirituality. Photo: Ana Bolívar (www.anabolivar.com)

Psychomagic is the newest book by the legendary surrealist filmmaker, comics author, Tarot expert and therapist, Alejandro Jodorowsky.

Psychomagic: The Transformative Power of Shamanic Psychotherapy is the brand new English translation of Jodorowsky’s poetic-action therapy techniques. The book  first appeared in Spanish in 2008.  It’s published by Inner Traditions and was released on June 18, 2010.

The book is separated into 3 sections, keeping Jodorowsky’s wide-ranging ramblings carefully collected.  Writer Gilles Farcet interacts with the author in the book’s first chapters which are written in a Q&A format.

An introductory essay by Farcet makes it clear that their “interview” consisted of his enduring an expansive, multi-layered monologue from Jodorowsky which was only later recast in the Q&A structure. The “knowing teacher vs. baffled student” feel of this section is absolutely delightful, and the disarming approach allows the deeper implications of Jodorowsky’s ideas to take the reader by surprise. In the second section, the author is matched more evenly with another interviewer – Javie Esteban.… Read the rest

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