Tag Archives | Ancient Civilizations

NASA Adds to Evidence of Mysterious Ancient Earthworks

So how are all the conventional historians going to explain this? The New York Times reports on NASA’s photographs revealing evidence of an ancient civilization in Kazakhstan, estimated to date back at least 8,000 years:

High in the skies over Kazakhstan, space-age technology has revealed an ancient mystery on the ground.

Photo: NASA

Photo: NASA


Satellite pictures of a remote and treeless northern steppe reveal colossal earthworks — geometric figures of squares, crosses, lines and rings the size of several football fields, recognizable only from the air and the oldest estimated at 8,000 years old.

The largest, near a Neolithic settlement, is a giant square of 101 raised mounds, its opposite corners connected by a diagonal cross, covering more terrain than the Great Pyramid of Cheops. Another is a kind of three-limbed swastika, its arms ending in zigzags bent counterclockwise.

Described last year at an archaeology conference in Istanbul as unique and previously unstudied, the earthworks, in the Turgai region of northern Kazakhstan, number at least 260 — mounds, trenches and ramparts — arrayed in five basic shapes.

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Ancient Civilization: Cracking the Indus Script

Andrew Robinson reflects on the most tantalizing of all the undeciphered scripts — that used in the civilization of the Indus valley in the third millennium BC, at Nature:

The Indus civilization flourished for half a millennium from about 2600 bc to 1900 bc. Then it mysteriously declined and vanished from view. It remained invisible for almost 4,000 years until its ruins were discovered by accident in the 1920s by British and Indian archaeologists. Following almost a century of excavation, it is today regarded as a civilization worthy of comparison with those of ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, as the beginning of Indian civilization and possibly as the origin of Hinduism.

ndus seal unicorn at Indian Museum. Photo: Royroydeb (CC)

Indus seal unicorn at Indian Museum. Photo: Royroydeb (CC)


More than a thousand Indus settlements covered at least 800,000 square kilometres of what is now Pakistan and northwestern India. It was the most extensive urban culture of its period, with a population of perhaps 1 million and a vigorous maritime export trade to the Gulf and cities such as Ur in Mesopotamia, where objects inscribed with Indus signs have been discovered.

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Britain’s Atlantis

There are some treasures of prehistoric Britain buried under the North Sea and archaeologists are planning to uncover what’s being dubbed “Britain’s Atlantis,” per the Independent:

Archaeologists are searching for the lost tribes of prehistoric Britain – at the bottom of the North Sea.

britain atlantis

In a unique and ground-breaking operation, scientists plan to search for evidence of Stone Age human activity on Britain’s very own ‘Atlantis’ – a vast prehistoric land, once located between England and southern Scandinavia, which was engulfed by rising sea levels some 7500 years ago.

The archaeologists hope to find evidence of flint tool manufacture, plant pollen and the DNA of plant and animal species used by the long-lost land’s ancient inhabitants. Due to be launched later this month, the multi-million pound project is the largest of its kind ever attempted anywhere in the world and will lead to the development by British scientists of an entire range of new scientific techniques and capabilities.

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Surfing the Liminal Aether with Bruce Damer Ph.D


Bruce Damer with Terence McKenna in 1999.

Via Midwest Real

Dr. Bruce Damer is a multi-disciplinary scientist and a (proud) woo-drenched renaissance man. He researches evolutionary biology, especially focusing on the murky questions surrounding the origin of life. Damer also designs asteroid-wrangling spacecrafts and is an expert in computer science who has spent decades researching emergent, lifelike virtual systems.


Why is it that we’re always searching for someone to tell us answers? We have an obsession with experts, scientists, teachers — gurus of all sorts. As long as I can remember, I’ve been under the impression that learning and knowledge come from some sort of external source, but what if that’s entirely backward? 

What if all of the answers are right there inside of you, somewhere within your own deepest murk just waiting to be discovered? Perhaps great men are simply skilled facilitators of knowledge and learning, while the actual evolving and growth is wholly incumbent upon the individual.Read the rest

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Ancient Settlements Grew Bigger And Denser Much Like Our Modern Cities

We can probably learn something from the fate of the large ancient settlements that failed. From Tech Times:

Modern cities with large populations and dense areas tend to be productive. Remarkably, these characteristics also appear to have been exhibited by ancient settlements. Findings of a new study revealed that ancient cities with bigger and denser settlements allowed their inhabitants to become more efficient.

Figure 2. Maps of the Basin of Mexico. A: Location within Mexico [34]. B: Settlements dating to the Formative period (circle size is proportional to population; colors range from yellow through red to white denoting increases in elevation; gray area shows the extent of Mexico City in 1964) [35]. C: Settlements dating to the Aztec period. During the latter period settlement expanded into the shallows of the lake. Today, settlement covers the entire basin and the lake has been drained. (PLOS ONE)

Figure 2. Maps of the Basin of Mexico.
A: Location within Mexico [34]. B: Settlements dating to the Formative period (circle size is proportional to population; colors range from yellow through red to white denoting increases in elevation; gray area shows the extent of Mexico City in 1964) [35]. C: Settlements dating to the Aztec period. During the latter period settlement expanded into the shallows of the lake. Today, settlement covers the entire basin and the lake has been drained. (PLOS ONE)

For the study published in the journal PLOS ONE on Feb.

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This Is What Killed The Ancient Mayans

A new study of the Great Blue Hole in Belize suggests that the rapid decline of the Ancient Mayan civilization was drought, reports Pioneer News:

Studying the Big Blue Hole in Belize has led scientists to a theory about the end of the Mayan civilization which thrived from 300 to 700 CE.

Great Blue Hole.jpg

“It’s like a big bucket. It’s a sediment trap,” explains Rice University Earth scientist, Andre Droxler. The study co-author continues, “When you have major drought, you start to get famines and unrest.”

Discovery explains how researchers use the Big Blue Hold in Belize to determine the how a shift in climate could have so dramatically affected the Mayan civilization: “During storms or wetter periods, excess water runs off from rivers and streams, overtops the retaining walls, and is deposited in a thin layer at the top of the lagoon. From there, all the sediments from these streams settle to the bottom of the lagoon, piling on top of each other and leaving a chronological record of the historical climate.”

“There’s a tremendous amount of change going on in Guatemala,” explains Robert Oglesby, a researcher from the University of Nebraska.

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Diving Japan’s Mysterious Yonaguni Underwater Ruins With Graham Hancock

Graham Hancock and his wife Santha Faiia investigated the mysterious underwater landscape at Yonaguni, Japan in a series of over 200 dives, well documented in his book Underworld: The Mysterious Origins of Civilization. He’s now released this video:

These are the Natural or man-made? You decide. (Point of information. Sea level rose just over 120 metres — 400 feet — at the end of the last Ice Age. All the structures seen here would have been above water until about 12,000 years ago).

Thanks to the great team from Seamen’s Club, Ishigaki, who joined us on all these dives (and hundreds more!) and provided wonderful technical support. Thanks also to Kihachiro Aratake and all at Sou.Wes diving, Yonaguni.

The sites featured in the video are:
Kerama (Aka Jima): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aka_Island
Yonaguni: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yonaguni
Chatan: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chatan,_…
Aguni: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aguni,_O…

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Graham Hancock Breaks the Set on TED Censorship, Lost Civilizations & War on Consciousness

Abby Martin interviews author and philosopher, Graham Hancock, about the mysteries of ancient civilization, hidden societies from the past, censorship by TED Talks and the difficulty in getting these ideas accepted by mainstream archaeologists and historians.

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Ancient Egyptians Used Wooden Sleds to Move Pyramid Stones and Overcame Problem of Friction With a Simple But Clever Trick: Wet Sand.

Gizah Pyramids. Photo: Ricardo Liberato (CC)

Gizah Pyramids. Photo: Ricardo Liberato (CC)

The mystery of how the pyramids were built at Giza, Egypt, has fascinated generation after generation of visitors. A new study purports to reveal the simple truth of it, reports the Washington Post:

Few have traveled to the pyramids of Egypt and not wondered how an ancient civilization without modern technology could have constructed structures so large they can be viewed from space. Some have theorized they were built inside out.

On the flakier side, some say aliens did it.

Perhaps the most confounding mystery of all involves how incredibly large stones made their way to the middle of the desert without massive mechanical assistance. No camel, even the Egyptian kind, is that strong.

The truth, researchers at the University of Amsterdam announced this week in a study published in the journal Physical Review Letters, may actually be quite simple. It has long been believed that Egyptians used wooden sleds to haul the stone, but until now it hasn’t been entirely understood how they had overcome the problem of friction. 

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The Great Forgetting

Photo: JLantzy

Photo: JLantzy

Lest we forget our once and former culture … Via Deep Ecology Hub:

The Great Forgetting refers to the wealth of knowledge that our culture lost when we adopted our new civilized lifestyle. The knowledge that allowed indigenous cultures to survive, the knowledge that we had once also been tribal and the understanding that we were but one mere culture of thousands. All of this disappeared in a few short generations.

The Great Forgetting accounts for an enourmous cultural collapse as once tribal people found themselves in a new and strange mass centralized society. New beliefs, new ways of life rushed into this cultural vaccuum to fill the void. But without being tested by natural selection over thousands of years this new culture was evolutionarily unstable.

It is only recently that the Great Forgetting has been exposed. Understanding it holds the key to making sense of our destructive culture.

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