Ancient Civilizations

The 3,300-year-old Dream Book, via the British Museum: The meaning of dreams is a subject that fascinated the ancient Egyptians. This hieratic papyrus, probably dates to the early reign of Ramesses II…


Fans of lost civilizations, this one’s for you, courtesy of the Sydney Morning Herald:

Archaeologists using revolutionary airborne laser technology have discovered a lost mediaeval city that thrived on a mist-shrouded Cambodian mountain 1200 years ago.

The stunning discovery of the city, Mahendraparvata, includes temples hidden by jungle for centuries – temples that archaeologists believe have never been looted.

An instrument called Lidar strapped to a helicopter which criss-crossed a mountain north of the Angkor Wat complex provided data that matched years of ground research by archaeologists. The research revealed the city that founded the Angkor Empire in 802AD.

The University of Sydney’s archaeology research centre in Cambodia brought the Lidar instrument to Cambodia and played a key role in the discovery that is set to revolutionise archaeology across the world…


Is the breathtaking stone structure the work of a 10,000-year-old civilization, or is it somehow an illusion? Atlas Obscura explains: The Yonaguni-jima Kaitei Chikei, literally translated as “Yonaguni Island Submarine Topography,” is…












I presented this paper at the annual meeting of the European Association of Archaeologists, held in Zadar, Croatia, September 18–23, 2007, in a session called “‘Fringe’ Archaeologies: ‘The Other’ Past,” organized by archeologists Eleni Stefanou and Anna Simandiraki.

This paper is in the form of a discursive essay, so if you were expecting a neatly developed argument, intricate footnotes, and a formal bibliography, you are going to be disappointed. I will, however, touch on a number of topics related to the title of this paper. And I will give enough hints for you to track down articles and books mentioned in the essay.

First, let me establish my credentials as a “fringe” archeologist, one whose work is concerned with the development of an “other” past. Andrew O’Hehir, in “Archaeology from the Dark Side” (Salon.com, August 6, 2005), said about me, “Cremo is a singular figure on the scientific fringe. He is friendly with mainstream archaeologists and with Graham Hancock [author of Fingerprints of the Gods].” I find myself on many lists of “fringe” and “pseudo” archeologists and archeologies. Why? Since 1984, I have been researching archeology and history of archeology from a perspective derived from my studies in the Puranas, the ancient historical writings of India, which contain accounts of extreme human antiquity, inconsistent with modern evolutionary accounts of human origins. And for some reason my work has become known in academic circles as well as among the general public. Some archeologists and other scholars find this kind of thing, which they call “fringe” or “folk” archeology, threatening…


Seeking to see other millennia when you look in the mirror? Janet Stephens is a master of what she calls forensic hairdressing — shown via a series of YouTube videos, she ingeniously recreates elaborate coiffure from ancient history, including the style of Roman empress Julia Domna, the Flavian-Trajanic “circle of hair”, and the complex braiding of the priestesses known as the Vestal Virgins:

Historical hairdressing tutorials based on archaeological research and primary sources.