Tag Archives | Andrew Auernheimer

“I’m Going To Prison For Arithmetic” Andrew Auernheimer aka Weev

Before entering the New Jersey courthouse to face his sentencing on March 18, 2013, Andrew Auernheimer (Weev) gave a short speech to the press and to his friends. Auernheimer was sentenced to 41 months in prison followed by three years supervised release. Auernheimer revealed a security flaw in AT&T's iPad user database, allowing him to scrape the data from 114,000 iPad users. The information was later on given to a journalist. In January 2011, the FBI did an investigation and filed a criminal complaint. Auernheimer was convicted on conspiracy to access a computer without authorization (18 U.S.C. § 1030(a)(2)(C), part of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act of 1986) and fraud in connection with personal information (18 U.S.C. § 1028(a)(7)). Find out more about Andrew Auernheimr: http://freeweev.info/ Via WeAreChange
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Interview with Andrew “Weev” Auernheimer: Charged for Exposing A Corporate Mistake

Luke Rudkowski got a chance to meet and interview well known hacker, Andrew Auernheimer, also known by his pseudonym, Weev. Weev was recently convicted for two felonies and currently is free on bail until sentencing, The court convicted him in one count of identity fraud and one count of conspiracy to access a computer without authorization. In this interview Weez explains what lead to these charges and how he is dealing with the situation. Via WeAreChange
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“Weev” Auernheimer on Free Speech versus Exploitation

Photo Courtesy: Wikipedia

Via The Internet Chronicle

Andrew Auernheimer, an American gray hat hacker better known as “weev,” tells The Internet Chronicle that his indictment in a New Jersey district court over a June 2010 AT&T data breach is at its root an important free speech issue. Speaking to Chronicle.su’s Gray Phone, Mr. Auernheimer, a 27-year-old associate of Goatse Security, claims he made certain AT&T was aware of the breach in time to patch it, he never sought financial gain from what was in effect the the extraction of 114,000 iPad users’ email addresses, and that he never personally possessed more customer data than enough to communicate that the breach was bona fide. While prosecutors imply Mr. Auernheimer’s actions and statements may constitute computer fraud and foreknowledge of possible insider trading, he and his fellow Goatse Security associates saw themselves as merely tarnishing a company’s reputation due to its own reckless mishandling of customer data.

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