Storyboard Artist Marty Cooper uses a combination of traditional animation techniques and his iPhone to create this series of charming cartoons (which you will watch because you’re not super cereal all the…

This brief interruption is brought to you by hyperspace. Via The Nexian: Cosmic Egg is an incredible new animation project by DMT-Nexus member Matt Reed. You can check out more of Matt’s…

Disinfonaut artist KREET-N’s explosively animated digital art mixes trippy images of death, sex, drugs and politics, carpet-bombing the frontal lobe into submission. Check his gallery out here. (NSFW) (Thanks, KREET-N!)  

A lost cartoon classic via Vimeo:

In 1968, an underground, anti-war short film was produced by Lee Savage and Milton Glaser called Mickey Mouse in Vietnam. Mickey Mouse (unofficially) starred in a one minute animation that depicted the Disney icon travelling to Vietnam in a boat, entering the country, and being immediately shot in the head. The film was shown to associates of the creators in 1970 and onward. It is rumoured (though unconfirmed) that Disney tried to destroy every copy that they could get in their possession.

Until recently, the only known copies available for public viewing were one owned by the Sarajevo Film Festival, and one included on the Film-makers’ Coop’s 38 minute, 16mm collection reel. The only pieces of hard evidence of the short’s existence available online were a few screenshots (all but one found in a 1998 French book entitled ‘Bon Anniversaire, Mickey!’).


In 2010, Londoner Gemma Atkinson was restrained, handcuffed, and threatened with arrest for an “act of terror” after using her phone to film police as they engaged in a random stop-and-frisk of her boyfriend. She launched a legal battle, and, with the money from a settlement, produced the following short film about her experience and how to resist police abuse of power:

Ah the majesty of nature. Take a few minutes to enjoy this and witness the hidden architecture of creation unfolding into manifest life in this incredible animated short film, “Nature by Numbers”.

Wondering how to make your life a bit more weird? Gilliam explains how to produce strange and wondrous things from household materials on the 1970s how-to series the Do-It-Yourself Animation Show. The rare television show which flips the tables by encouraging engagement, not passive consumption, of media, it was created and curated by British cartooning legend Bob Godfrey, who died this past week. Cartoon Brew explains:

The Do-It-Yourself Animation Show, which made animation accessible to the masses by taking the mystery out of the production process, was vastly influential and inspired an entire generation of kids in England, including Nick Park, who created Wallace & Gromit, and Richard Bazley, an animator on Pocahontas, Hercules, and The Iron Giant.

There’s already something endearingly cartoon-like about Ancient Aliens star Giorgio Tsoukalos: his hair alone has launched a thousand memes, to say nothing of some of his Cosmic Love God fashion sense and compulsive quotability. (To his great credit, Giorgio is very much aware of his internet-fame and has a wonderful attitude about it. When I met him two separate kids approached and asked if he “was the guy from the memes.” Giorgio responded with a friendly smile and struck this pose long enough for each of them to snap a photo.)

Well, anyway, now Tsoukalos isn’t just cartoon-like, thanks to the efforts of one animator. Check out this (admittedly creepy) animated take on Giorgio. (It seems to be a one-off effort, but I wouldn’t mind seeing a Tsoukalos & Pals cartoon in my local television listings….)

BREER1-obit-articleLargeHis style was followed by everyone from Monty Python to MTV, but for sheer optical pleasure, Robert Breer’s short avant-garde animations can’t be beaten. The New York Times eulogizes:

Robert Breer, an animator whose use of novel techniques opened up a new language for film, died on Aug. 11 at his home in Tucson. He was 84. Mr. Breer, a painter by training, early on saw the potential for breaking with the narrative sequences and anthropomorphic forms that defined the medium [of animation].

Viewers were bombarded with wiggling lines, letters, abstract shapes and live-action images that jumped and flashed, zoomed and receded. “He was a seminal figure in the new American cinema and the American avant-garde beginning in the 1950s and continuing right up to the present,” said Andrew Lampert of the Anthology Film Archives in Manhattan.

io9 and CONELRAD Adjacent detail a broadcast of the Ed Sullivan Show that “scared the hell out of kids” when a short animation was aired on 27 May 1956. Peter and Joan Foldes’ cartoon, A Short Vision, depicts a nuclear apocalypse, showing the faces of men and animals melting off, the audience off guard when Sullivan shared no warning but this introduction:

“Just last week you read about the H-bomb being dropped. Now two great English writers, two very imaginative writers – I’m gonna tell you if you have youngsters in the living room tell them not to be alarmed at this ‘cause it’s a fantasy, the whole thing is animated – but two English writers, Joan and Peter Foldes, wrote a thing which they called ‘A Short Vision’ in which they wondered what might happen to the animal population of the world if an H-bomb were dropped. It’s produced by George K. Arthur and I’d like you to see it. It is grim, but I think we can all stand it to realize that in war there is no winner.”