Tag Archives | Animation

Do-It-Yourself Animation With Terry Gilliam

Wondering how to make your life a bit more weird? Gilliam explains how to produce strange and wondrous things from household materials on the 1970s how-to series the Do-It-Yourself Animation Show. The rare television show which flips the tables by encouraging engagement, not passive consumption, of media, it was created and curated by British cartooning legend Bob Godfrey, who died this past week. Cartoon Brew explains:
The Do-It-Yourself Animation Show, which made animation accessible to the masses by taking the mystery out of the production process, was vastly influential and inspired an entire generation of kids in England, including Nick Park, who created Wallace & Gromit, and Richard Bazley, an animator on Pocahontas, Hercules, and The Iron Giant.
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Enter the Uncanny Valley with Animated Giorgio Tsoukalos

There's already something endearingly cartoon-like about Ancient Aliens star Giorgio Tsoukalos: his hair alone has launched a thousand memes, to say nothing of some of his Cosmic Love God fashion sense and compulsive quotability. (To his great credit, Giorgio is very much aware of his internet-fame and has a wonderful attitude about it. When I met him two separate kids approached and asked if he "was the guy from the memes." Giorgio responded with a friendly smile and struck this pose long enough for each of them to snap a photo.) Well, anyway, now Tsoukalos isn't just cartoon-like, thanks to the efforts of one animator. Check out this (admittedly creepy) animated take on Giorgio. (It seems to be a one-off effort, but I wouldn't mind seeing a Tsoukalos & Pals cartoon in my local television listings....)
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Experimental Animation Pioneer Robert Breer Dies

BREER1-obit-articleLargeHis style was followed by everyone from Monty Python to MTV, but for sheer optical pleasure, Robert Breer's short avant-garde animations can't be beaten. The New York Times eulogizes:
Robert Breer, an animator whose use of novel techniques opened up a new language for film, died on Aug. 11 at his home in Tucson. He was 84. Mr. Breer, a painter by training, early on saw the potential for breaking with the narrative sequences and anthropomorphic forms that defined the medium [of animation]. Viewers were bombarded with wiggling lines, letters, abstract shapes and live-action images that jumped and flashed, zoomed and receded. “He was a seminal figure in the new American cinema and the American avant-garde beginning in the 1950s and continuing right up to the present,” said Andrew Lampert of the Anthology Film Archives in Manhattan.
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