Says FreakOutNation:

With our Global governments stomping out dissent casually, creating distractions such as their acronymic censorship laws, only to put others forth while one is placed in temporary retirement, virtually exhausting the public until they accept authoritarianism, others have stepped up the plate. Ever since Sabu’s arrest, many in opposition to Anonymous and LulzSec thought the game was over — but it’s only reinvigorated them. The following video is done with a Star Wars theme, with the addition of powerful words and visuals:

Don’t mess with “open and free internets”! Robert Andrews reports on Anonymous’ latest target for Gigaom:

God forbid anyone incur the combined wrath of both The Pirate Bay and Anonymous.

The hacking collective is claiming responsibility for levelling a successful distributed denial of service (DDOS) attack on the websites of Virgin Media.

Anonymous tweet

Virgin became the first UK ISP to block its subscribers’ access to The Pirate Bay last week, following a High Court ruling that the Bay breaches record label copyrights and should be blocked…

Here’s what happens when you proclaim yourself to be the representative of the Anonymous meme. Buzzfeed reports: Last month, the FBI raided the Dallas home of Barrett Brown, the journalist and unofficial…

AnontuneAngela Watercutter writes on WIRED:

In a move sure to attract attention from the music industry, a small group of coders claiming to be part of Anonymous is putting together a social music platform. The rather ambitious goal: Create a service that seamlessly pulls up songs streaming from all around the internet.

The project, called Anontune and still in its infancy, is designed to pull songs from third-party sources like YouTube and let anonymous users put them into playlists and share them — while keeping the service from being shut down by music industry lawsuits.

Reached by e-mail, one of the creators of Anontune told Wired the project was started by a group of anons who met online six years ago on what was then an underground hacking site. The group, mostly focused at the time on “cracking,” began discussing music, favorite artists and what they would do to fix current music business models…

“Anonymous kind of was like the strong, buff kid who had low self esteem and then all of a sudden punched somebody in the face and was like, ‘Holy Shit, I’m really strong!'”

This was just one great quote from We Are Legion: The Story of the Hacktivists, which premiered last night at Austin’s South By South West festival in a jammed Vimeo Theater.

Brian Knappenberger’s documentary is a revealing look at the culture of 4Chan and Anonymous, showing the world just how much power this loose but large group really has. In addition to Knappenberger, Internet activist and sometime Anon Gregg Housh led a fascinating Q&A session following the movie, demonstrating how the filmmakers have been able to gain the trust of, and therefore access to, many of the individuals who “are” Anonymous. This movie is going to be huge and I’m hoping to see it released generally soon. Until then, here’s the trailer:

Musically suspect Atari Teenage Riot sets a nice example. Here’s how to maintain your credibility when corporations knock on your door — accept their money and give it away to their most hated enemies. Pitchfork reports:

Alec Empire, frontman of the German electropunk group Atari Teenage Riot, has handed a large sum earned from Sony Entertainment off to FreeAnons, which is part of the pro-hacker Anonymous Solidarity Network [and] offers financial support to individuals facing legal trouble for alleged work with the Anonymous hacker group.

The money came from licensing the song “Black Flags” for use in a commercial for the PlayStation Vita console. It’s a particularly humorous move considering that Anonymous has in the past been in direct conflict with Sony.

Via Russia Today: The activist hacking group Anonymous, responsible for numerous high-profile attacks on corporations and government bodies, has now targeted the Holy See, taking down and is warning of a…

Monsanto is considered by many to be the poster child for corporate criminals so it is no surprise that hacktivists have gone after the Genetic Engineering giant. CNET reveals that AntiSec has…