Tag Archives | Anorexia

Secret Society Connecting Through the Internet Feeds Eating Disorders

'Anorexia nervosa' by Dr Mohamed Osman, Physician & Artist

'Anorexia nervosa' by Dr Mohamed Osman, Physician & Artist

ScienceDaily reports:

University of Cincinnati communication researchers are reporting on a new type of social support group as social networks grow on the Web. This emerging Online Negative Enabling Support Group (ONESG) surrounding the pro-anorexia movement is reported in the current issue of the journal, New Media & Society.

Members of this society embrace anorexia as a choice rather than acknowledging it as an illness. The ONESG pro-anorexia movement reflects four themes and uses several communication strategies to encourage anorexics to embrace their harmful and dangerous impulses, writes lead author Stephen M. Haas, a UC associate professor of communication. The themes are:

  • Staying “true” to the anorexia movement — Forums and blogs invite members to discuss eating, binging and exercising, an “online confessional” of sorts where members can confess their guilt if they feel they have eaten too much or have not exercised enough to stay inline with the movement.
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February 4: The Death Day Of Karen Carpenter

Joseph Allen writes about Karen’s hunger for affection at RockStarMartyr.net:

2-2 KC Superstar still

From Todd Haynes' "Superstar" (1987)

I’ve been listening to The Carpenters for three days straight. Does that make me a pansy? Of course not. These are sentimental love songs from a woman to a man—well, from Karen to me—and that’s miles from the pink-zone. Karen’s motherly voice pours suburban melancholy into my open wounds. I dare any road-hardened man to sit by himself—with a fifth of whiskey and a loaded gun—and listen to “Solitaire” as many times as I have. You’ll never make it out alive.

Karen Carpenter’s biography is as heart-wrenching as her wistful tenor. Her musical virtuosity was matched only by her willingness to be a victim to her controlling family, her conniving husband, and ultimately, to her own maniacal vanity, for which she starved herself to death. Randy Schmidt’s new book, Little Girl Blue: The Life of Karen Carpenter, weaves first-hand accounts of Karen’s futile quest to become a grown woman, which ended in her childhood home on February 4, 1983, at age 32.… Read the rest

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