Tag Archives | Anthony Bourdain

Anthony Bourdain Meets the Beats

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Celebrity chef and author Anthony Bourdain recently premiered his new show on CNN. The title of Parts Unknown references both the remote locations the show focuses on as well as the odd bits of fruits, veggies and animals that make their way into the more exotic dishes Bourdain spotlights. The title also has a hint of ominousness to it and it’s these dark overtones that tell you Bourdain is really on to something, here.

Fans of No Reservations will find plenty to like here, but fans of particular episodes of Bourdain’s former, famous Travel Channel show will be especially pleased. For me, No Reservations was at its best when the places were gritty and the stories Bourdain uncovered were dark and deeply human – episodes from Columbia, Laos and Lebanon all leap to mind.

The first handful of episodes from Parts Unknown are packed with Bourdain at his edgy best: He recalls the destructiveness of the L.A.… Read the rest

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Would You Eat Another Person?

Photo: WNYC (CC)

Forget about the “yes if I was starving to death after a plane crash” answer. How about if it was part of a Brooklyn food festival? If you’re Anthony Bourdain, “Yes, yes, I fucking would.” (Apparently he’d like to deep fry Dick Cheney’s head, fuck him up the ass and then cook him. Each to his own, I guess.) Dana Goodyear reports on modern cannibalism for The New Yorker:

Probably the most scandalous assertion of Upton Sinclair’s fictional exposé of Packingtown was that the careless, virtually unregulated, factory-style processing of meat that was the norm at the turn of the century was making unwitting cannibals of the American public. Men working in the steam rooms, he wrote, would fall into open vats in the floor

“and when they were fished out, there was never enough of them left to be worth exhibiting—sometimes they would be overlooked for days, till all but the bones of them had gone out to the world as Durham’s Pure Leaf Lard!”

Cannibalism—whether unintentional, deliberate (as with the Donner Party, the Uruguayan rugby team, and scores of sailors in extremis) or plain murderous (the recent incident in Florida)—represents the most troubling extreme of our omnivorous condition.

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