Tag Archives | anthopology

5,000-Year-Old, Giant Elk-Shaped Structure Discovered In Russia

Ancient stone strangeness via NBC News:

A huge geoglyph in the shape of an elk or deer discovered in Russia may predate Peru’s famous Nazca Lines by thousands of years. The style of stone-working called lithic chipping used on one artifact dates it to the Neolithic and Eneolithic (sixth to third millennia B.C.).

The animal-shaped stone structure, located near Lake Zjuratkul in the Ural Mountains, north of Kazakhstan, has an elongated muzzle, four legs and two antlers. The animal stretches for about 900 feet at its farthest points (northwest to southeast), the researchers estimate, equivalent to two American football fields.

Fieldwork carried out this past summer has shed more light on the glyph’s composition and date, suggesting it may be the product of a “megalithic culture,” researchers say. A man named Alexander Shestakov first discovered the glyphs using satellite images. He alerted researchers, who sent out a hydroplane and paraglider to survey the giant structure.

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‘Cursing Stone’ Found On Isle Of Canna

450px-Cursing_Stone,_Carlisle_-_geograph.org.uk_-_916217Would you test the powers of the cursing stone? The first ever uncovered in Scotland, it supposedly can cast a spell when it is rotated while the proper prayer is spoken. BBC reports:

A stone discovered by chance in an old graveyard on the Isle of Canna is Scotland’s first known example of a bullaun “cursing stone”, experts have revealed. Dating from about 800 AD, the stones are associated with early Christian crosses – of which there is one on the isle.

It was later found to fit exactly into a large rectangular stone with a worn hole which was located at the base of the Canna cross. Traditionally, the pilgrim would recite a prayer while turning the stone clockwise, wearing a depression or hole in the stone underneath.

Katherine Forsyth, an expert in the history and culture of early Celtic-speaking peoples, based at the University of Glasgow, described it as an “amazing find”.

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