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The joys of collecting thousands of vintage sleazy books

Collecting Paperbacks Fanzine

For those of you who remember the eighties, you may have had that one friend who partook in the hobby of paperback collecting. The goal was to make a collection of one copy of every book produced by a certain publisher. Some enthusiasts still partake in this hobby.

Lance Casebeer and Bob Speray in 1984 started a collection that stood out in the book collection community. The goal was to get one copy of every book published by Greenleaf Classics. Greenleaf published under many different imprints over the years, including Adult Books, Ember Library and the reputable Corinth’s. Amassing an archive of all these books has proved challenging for these two enthusiasts. They focus on books published from 1959 through 1975, though Greenleaf continued to produce sleazy books many years after that. When you search their gallery you’re bound to come across some rather peculiar titles — The Last Orgy; Sex and the Single Gay Girl; Doubled in Lust; The Demon Dyke; and thousands more.… Read the rest

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NYMZA Aeros – Charles Dellschau and The Secret Airships of the 1850’s

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Charles A.A. Dellschau (1830 – 1923), untitled watercolor on paper c. 1898 – 1900 approx. 8 x 10 inches.

 

NYMZA Aeros – Charles Dellschau and The Secret Airships of the 1850’s

by Jimmy Ward & Pete Navarro
Posted on 15 May 2015 by Olav Phillips

Have you heard of Schultz’ Hydrowhir Auto, also known as the “Cripel Wagon”? If not, perhaps you have heard or read somewhere about Peter Mennis’ “Aero Goosey”? How about Schoetler’s “Aero Dora”, which was built in 1858 and was destroyed in a fire which consumed the town of Columbia, California that same year? Chances are you never heard or read about any of the above or the many other “Aeros’, or aircraft that were designed and actually built and flown
by members of the Sonora Aero Club around the middle of the last century in California.

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Not voting: Why Buckminster Fuller said this is important to our success

"BuckminsterFuller1" by en:User:Edgy01 (Dan Lindsay) - Own work. Licensed under CC BY 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons.

BuckminsterFuller1” by en:User:Edgy01 (Dan Lindsay) – Own work. Licensed under CC BY 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons.

L. Steven Sieden via Examiner.com:

When asked if he voted, Buckminster Fuller adamantly replied,

“Of course I don’t vote. I’m completely apolitical.”

For most of his life Fuller championed a world that works for everyone and the fact that political leaders can never achieve such a vision. He felt that voting only encouraged politicians and others to believe that they were in power and capable of making the changes we so desperately need. He correctly predicted the growing cultural trend of people not voting, and that trend continues to provide many people with great as we move toward an age of true democracy. His often quoted statement about politicians is even more relevant today, than it was decades ago when he first made it.

“Political leaders look out only fort heir own side.

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Snowden Digital Surveillance Archive

snowdenarchive

via Snowden Archive:

This archive is a collection of all documents leaked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden that have subsequently been published by news media.

Our aim in creating this archive is to provide a tool that would facilitate citizen, researcher and journalist access to these important documents. Indexes, document descriptions, links to original documents and to related news stories, a glossary and comprehensive search features are all designed to enable a better understanding of state surveillance programs within the wider context of surveillance by the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA) along with its partners in the Five Eyes countries – U.K., Canada, Australia and New Zealand.

Our hope is that this resource will contribute to greater awareness of the broad scope, intimate reach and profound implications of the global surveillance infrastructures and practices that Edward Snowden’s historic document leak reveals.

The Snowden Archive is the result of a research collaboration between Canadian Journalists for Free Expression (CJFE) and the Politics of Surveillance Project at the Faculty of Information at the University of Toronto.

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Human Biocomputer

Via Wikipedia.org:

The term human biocomputer, coined by John C. Lilly, refers to the “hardware” of the human anatomy. This would include the brain, internal organs, and other human organ systems such as cardiovascular, digestive, endocrine, immune, integumentary, lymphatic, muscular, nervous, reproductive, respiratory, skeletal, and urinary systems. The biocomputer has stored program properties, and self-metaprogramming properties, with limits determinable and to be determined.


The functional organization of the human biocomputer is:

Level – parts

11. Above and in biocomputer: unknown
10. Beyond metaprogramming: supra-species-metaprograms
9. To be metaprogrammed: supra-self-metaprograms
8. To metaprogram: self-metaprogram – awareness
7. To program sets of programs: metaprograms – metaprogram storage
6. Detailed instructions: programs – program storage
5. Details of instructions: subroutines – subroutine storage
4. Signs of activity: biochemical activity – neural activity – glial activity – vascular activity
3.

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The 6 Grand Illusions That Keep Us Enslaved

Via Sigmund Fraud at Waking Times:

“In prison, illusions can offer comfort.” — Nelson Mandela.

For a magician to fool his audience his deceit must go unseen, and to this end he crafts an illusion to avert attention from reality. While the audience is entranced, the deceptive act is committed, and for the fool, reality then becomes inexplicably built upon on a lie. That is, until the fool wakes up and recognizes the truth in the fact that he has been duped.

Maintaining the suspension of disbelief in the illusion, however, is often more comforting than acknowledging the magician’s secrets.

We live in a world of illusion. So many of the concerns that occupy the mind and the tasks that fill the calendar arise from planted impulses to become someone or something that we are not. This is no accident. As we are indoctrinated into this authoritarian-corporate-consumer culture that now dominates the human race, we are trained that certain aspects of our society are untouchable truths, and that particular ways of being and behaving are preferred.

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The Revolution of Everyday Life: The Decline and Fall of Work

JD Hancock (CC BY 2.0)

JD Hancock (CC BY 2.0)

by Raoul Vaneigem at The Situationist International Text Library

The duty to produce alienates the passion for creation. Productive labour is part and parcel of the technology of law and order. The working day grows shorter as the empire of conditioning extends.In an industrial society which confuses work and productivity, the necessity of producing has always been an enemy of the desire to create. What spark of humanity, of a possible creativity, can remain alive in a being dragged out of sleep at six every morning, jolted about in suburban trains, deafened by the racket of machinery, bleached and steamed by meaningless sounds and gestures, spun dry by statistical controls, and tossed out at the end of the day into the entrance halls of railway stations, those cathedrals of departure for the hell of weekdays and the nugatory paradise of weekends, where the crowd communes in weariness and boredom?

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Dualism vs. Monism in a Nihilist Context

Hartwig HKD (CC BY-ND 2.0)

Hartwig HKD (CC BY-ND 2.0)

Via Spinoza Ray Prozak at American Nihilist Underground Society (Anus.com):

This world may be a simulation. We may be figments of the imagination of a daydreaming god. We may be pure mathematics, or data in some cosmic computer. Or we could be physical beings, or some combination of the above. However, if this world has one characteristic to rely on, it’s this: it creates the same response to the same causal impetus.

That means if you pick up a ball and hold your arm up away from your body and drop the ball, it will fall — every time. Even if a friend sneaks a hand in there to catch it, it will begin falling first. If you put a support table under your hand so the ball doesn’t drop, the effect can be observed that the instant the table is removed the ball drops.

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Read The Very First Comic Book: The Adventures of Obadiah Oldbuck

 

Obadiah Oldbuck

Via Open Culture.com

Comic books, as any enthusiast of comics books won’t hesitate to tell you, have a long and robust history, one that extends far wider and deeper than the 20th-century caped musclemen, carousing teenagers, and wisecracking animals so many associate with the medium. The scholarship on comic-book history — still a relatively young field, you understand — has more than once revised its conclusions on exactly how far back its roots go, but as of now, the earliest acknowledged comic book dates to 1837.

The Adventures of Obadiah Oldbuck, according to thecomicbooks.com’s page on early comic-book history, “was done by Switzerland’s Rudolphe Töpffer, who has been considered in Europe (and starting to become here in America) as the creator of the picture story. He created the comic strip in 1827,” going on to create comic books “that were extremely successful and reprinted in many different languages; several of them had English versions in America in 1846.

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The Octave of Energy – Robert Anton Wilson

Felipe Gabaldón (CC BY 2.0)

Felipe Gabaldón (CC BY 2.0)

Via Deoxy.org/Robert Anton Wilson

The Law of Octaves was first suggested by Pythagoras in ancient Greece. Having observed that the eight notes of the conventional Occidental musical scale were governed by definite mathematical relationships, Pythagoras proceeded to create a whole cosmology based on 8s. In this octagonal model Pythagoras made numerous mistakes, because he was generalizing from insufficient data. However, his work was the first attempt in history to unify science, mathematics, art and mysticism into one comprehensible system and as such is still influential. Leary, Crowley and Buckminster Fuller have all described themselves as modern Pythagoreans.

In China, roughly contemporary with Pythagoras, the Taoists built up a cosmology based on the interplay of yang (positive) and yin (negative), which produced the eight trigrams of the I Ching, out of which are generated the 64 hexagrams.

In India, Buddha announced, after his illumination under the Bodhi tree, the Noble Eightfold Path.

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