Tag Archives | Art

DIGITAL ADDICTION | Imitate Modern Gallery

RHK1Having just returned to London from painting his largest architectural scale installation to date, the exterior of a massive 5 story, 10k square foot food bank in Lower Silesia – Poland, RSH announces the release his limited edition print DIGITAL ADDICTION via London’s Imitate Modern Gallery.“Digital Addiction” is a powerful abstract metaform built from composite layers of paintings/3D modelling/html5 panorama/and collage to create an extraordinary print of light and depth that thematically considers society’s 21st century addiction to digital imagery and its continual manipulation.

A 5 colour silk screened, 3 colour ways print in an edition of 33 each on 400 gsm heavy Bristol paper with metallic ink overlays in each of copper, gold, and silver editions. The print image is 24×24 inches on a 32×32 inch sized paper.

“At all levels, ultimately graffiti is an act of cultural insurgency. It is a rebellion; against the norm, against society at large, against corporations, against the city or “government.” Graffiti is the act of changing the visual environment in the public space.
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Pursuing Justice Through Filmmaking, Why we Create Beauty, Hot Dog Related Altercations

Via Midwest Real

Filmmakers Spencer Chumbley and Erik Ljung have shot for organizations like VICE and Al Jazeera. I caught up with the guys just before they debuted their film, The Death of Cory Stingley a the Milwaukee Film Festival. 

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Humans make things, we always have. But, we don’t just make, we create beauty. We pay attention to symmetry, form and detail. Why is that? Darwinian theory says it’s simply a form of “peacocking.” More specifically, our creative predispositions are merely “fitness signals.” For example, if you write a novel, create a moving peace of art, or compose a great song, it’s just a uniquely human way of showing off your intellect in hopes of attracting a mate, like a peacock with it’s innately douchey bouquet of feathers.

I fucking hate this idea.  

But, let’s be fair. It’s totally undeniable that ego and social elevation are often intertwined with creative accomplishments.Read the rest

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Sulawesi Cave Paintings Offer New Conclusions About Origins of Art

Cave paintings in Sulawesi, Indonesia, have been estimated to be at least 39,900 years old, changing ideas about creative art being exclusively European, reports BBC News (note to Graham Hancock fans: how does this affect Graham’s hypothesis in Supernatural?):

Scientists have identified some of the earliest cave paintings produced by humans.

Sulawesi cave painting with Dr Maxime Aubert (Photo: Dr. Aubert).

Sulawesi cave painting with Dr Maxime Aubert (Photo: Dr. Aubert).

Until now, paintings this old had been confirmed in caves only in Western Europe.

Researchers tell the journal Nature that the Indonesian discovery transforms ideas about how humans first developed the ability to produce art.

Early artists made them by carefully blowing paint around hands that were pressed tightly against the cave walls and ceilings. The oldest is at least 40,000 years old.

There are also human figures, and pictures of wild hoofed animals that are found only on the island. Dr Maxime Aubert, of Griffith University in Queensland, Australia, who dated the paintings found in Maros in Southern Sulawesi, explained that one of them (shown immediately below) was probably the earliest of its type.

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I:MAGE 2014 – Traveling with Unfamiliar Spirits

Between October 21st 2014 – November 2nd 2014 Fulgur Esoterica will host I:MAGE 2014 Traveling with Unfamiliar Spirits, a two weeks long festival dedicated to the relationship between contemporary artists and spirit entities. The festival comprises of a group exhibition (artists include Mark Titchner, Agostino Arrivabene, Shannon Taggart and Jesse Bransford), a one day academic conference at the Warburg Institute, the publication of three volumes exploring art and the occult (cinema, visual and performance art are all covered from both an academic and a practitioner standpoint) and a series of events.

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The Origin of Witches

Johann Heinrich Füssli 019

The Three Witches (Johann Heinrich Füssli)

“Where do witches come from?” asks Alastair Sooke at BBC Culture:

Ask any Western child to draw a witch, and the chances are that he or she will come up with something familiar: most likely a hook-nosed hag wearing a pointy hat, riding a broomstick or stirring a cauldron. But where did this image come from? The answer is more arresting and complex than you might think, as I discovered last week when I visited Witches and Wicked Bodies, a new exhibition at the British Museum in London that explores the iconography of witchcraft.

Witches have a long and elaborate history. Their forerunners appear in the Bible, in the story of King Saul consulting the so-called Witch of Endor. They also crop up in the classical era in the form of winged harpies and screech-owl-like “strixes” – frightening flying creatures that fed on the flesh of babies.

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Beautiful Paintings from a 5-Year-Old Autistic Girl

Iris Grace, an autistic 5-year-old, paints beautiful abstracts.

via irisgracepainting.com:

Paintings by Iris Grace, a 5 year old with an extraordinary talent to express herself through painting. She is Autistic and is only just starting to talk but is able to paint in a style far beyond her years. We wanted to share her art to raise awareness of her condition and inspire other families in similar situations to ours. Autism is currently affecting around 100,000 children in the UK and these numbers are rising. In the summer of 2013 Iris’s story was published Globally in 207 different countries and over 1.4 million people visited her site with now over 40 thousand following her adventures on Facebook. She has sold paintings to private art collectors here in the UK and all over the world, in Europe, America, South America and Asia.

To purchase Iris’ paintings or to look at more of her work, go here.… Read the rest

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Art Now: What is Art?

“President Leon Botstein of Bard College steps boldly into the fray to answer one of the most enduring human questions: What is art? This discussion spills over into debates about art’s value to society —- whether access to the arts is right as basic as education or health care, and whether it should be assessed and supported by government or left to the “invisible hand” of the free market. President Botstein explains why it is essential to ask these questions and offers a sturdy basis for evaluating them. He goes so far as to suggest that engaging with art can give our lives meaning and purpose.”

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The Galactic Dialogue is the Most Potent Hypersigil Head Trip Since The Invisibles and It’s Out Now!

GalacticCoverOkay, if you’re a bit suspicious of me shit talking my own book in the headline, one reader on Amazon who found it even though it wasn’t technically out yet had this to say:

“Reading the words gleamed [sic] from this hypersigil of a book will tear down the veil and hand you a pair of 4th dimensional binoculars.”

Good times, and truthfully the only reason I’m comparing it to The Invisibles in the first place has to do with me accidentally putting it out on the 20th anniversary of its release and all. Well, and the whole Occult “alien” thing. Here’s the part where I try to sell you on it with words:

It could be said that I didn’t choose the Occult, the Occult chose me. It’s a long story and you’ll have to read the book, but let’s just say that some sort of fifth dimensional weirdo showed up in my room one day and broke a primal thought sequence deep within me.… Read the rest

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Author Ray Bradbury’s Sci-Fi Art Collection Up for Auction

The cover illustration from Bradbury's acclaimed novel, Fahrenheit 451, now up for auction. Credit: Nate D. Sanders auction

The cover illustration from Bradbury’s acclaimed novel, Fahrenheit 451, now up for auction.
Credit: Nate D. Sanders auction

If only I had extra money like that lying around..

via Live Science:

Fans of the renowned American author Ray Bradbury take note: The writer’s personal collection of sci-fi memorabilia and art is now being auctioned off online.

Bradbury is best known for his 1953 dystopian masterpiece, “Fahrenheit 451,” as well as a collection of short stories about a human colony on Mars, called “The Martian Chronicles,” published in 1950. For decades, he worked in Hollywood, where his writing was adapted for television, the big screen and comic books.

Bradbury died in 2012 at the age of 91, leaving behind a huge collection of art and memorabilia inspired by space, science fiction and fantasy. Among the items up for sale are the original-concept drawings and illustrations for many of Bradbury’s novels and short stories, most of them by Joseph Mugnaini, Bradbury’s longtime collaborator.

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