Tag Archives | Art

Op-Ed: When it comes to comics, let’s put literary criticism back on the shelf

Tim McFarlane/Flickr, CC BY-NC-SA

Tim McFarlane/Flickr, CC BY-NC-SA

This article was originally published on The Conversation.
Read the original article.

By David Sweeney, Glasgow School of Art

For the second year running, the Edinburgh International Book Festival returns with Stripped 2014; a strand dedicated exclusively to comics and graphic novels. It has even commissioned its own graphic novel – a dystopian vision of Scotland’s future called IDP:2043 – as a centrepiece. But this absorption of comic books into a culturally highbrow setting should not go unquestioned.

A few years ago I attended a public interview featuring David Simon, creator of the critically acclaimed HBO television series The Wire. Simon’s questioner, a seemingly beleaguered broadsheet journalist, started off by comparing the series to “a novel”; Simon seemed puzzled by the comparison and asked the journalist to elaborate. The Wire was like a novel, the journalist explained, because it was a text of “high quality”.… Read the rest

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Interview: John Waters on his “exploitation films for art theaters”

Waters at Pen America/Free Expression Literature, May 2014. © Ed Lederman/PEN American Center via Wikimedia Commons

Waters at Pen America/Free Expression Literature, May 2014.
© Ed Lederman/PEN American Center via Wikimedia Commons

The Film Society of Lincoln Center in New York City is hosting a retrospective of John Waters’ films beginning this week. They are also showcasing “John Waters Presents: ‘Movies I’m Jealous I Didn’t Make‘”:

Here they are—eight extreme, astoundingly perverse, darkly funny, and, most importantly, supremely surprising films that turn me green with envy. Every day I feel inadequate thinking of these fanatically obsessive, ludicrously sexual, unfathomably criminal, melodramatically misguided cinematic gems. Why oh why can’t I make films like these—ones that jolted me out of all cinematic lethargy? Exploitation, art, horror? There’s no such thing as genre when you’ve slipped to the other side of cinema-sanity. See for yourself the movies that drove me beyond the pale of normal movie madness. Jealousy over other directors’ careers is a terrible thing to waste. — John Waters

The series includes CrashFinal DestinationBefore I ForgetKiller JoeThe MotherNight GamesOf Unknown Origin, and Thérèse.… Read the rest

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Propaganda Posters

U.S. Patriotism Poster

U.S. Patriotism Poster

One of my favorite things to collect are old propaganda posters. There’s something both chilling and comforting in the way that the systems of power have so crassly and transparently strived to manipulate us, using incredibly similar techniques for so many generations. And, of course, the illustration work is as fascinating as the history behind it.

Some associates have started a new resource for collecting together these old images, and I hope it will become a more robust database as time goes on. If Disinfonauts are interested, it’s free to edit and easy to upload images and info to propaganda.silk.co. As of writing this, so far there are only categories for US and UK WWII art, so I hope people soon add WWI, the Bolshevik Revolution, Soviet posters and anything else that is historically significant and visually stimulating. It may also become a good forum for discussing what propaganda is and how it works.… Read the rest

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Mind Blowing Art By A Man With Pineal Gland Cancer

The Nexian summarizes some of this mans incredible story:

During his time at art school, Shawn Thornton unknowingly developed cancer of the pineal gland. Curiously, as his condition progressed his art transformed into ever more complex and finely polished scenes that many find reminiscent to DMT experiences, often alluding to the mythology, symbolism, or biology surrounding the pineal gland. Here we take a quick look at his fascinating story and art.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read the rest and see more art here.

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A Brief Look at Texting and the Internet in Film

H/T Laughing Squid

Tony Zhou of Every Frame a Painting explores depictions of texting and online interactions in film.

“Is there a better way of showing a text message in a film? How about the internet? Even though we’re well into the digital age, film is still ineffective at depicting the world we live in. Maybe the solution lies not in content, but in form.”

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Synchromusicology Pt. I : Synchromusicology, Chromotherapy, Synesthesia, and the Aural Current of Electric Audiomancy

First of a five part series by SoundlessdawnEzra Sandzer-Bell

Synchromusicology, Chromotherapy, Synesthesia, and the Aural Current of Electric Audiomancy

Via Youtube:

The rank of Magus is reserved for an elite class of philosophers and metaphysicians who hold the keys to divine knowledge. Mundane, consumer-oriented culture of postmodern Earth has cast down these noble spiritual teachers in the name of hyper-rational materialism. Ancient wisdom is lost amidst the rise of flashy exoteric performance, forcing the magus outward into the exoteric categories of stage (MAG)icians and stage (MUS)icians.

Clues as to the tangible content of a lost musical knowledge are scattered throughout encyclopedias and books on tonal harmony.

Synchromusicologists are a new branch of independent researchers who gather data on the Hidden Origins of Western Music and the power of sympathetic geometry to generate love and to heal wounds. This video offers you the first tastes of what is to come from this school of thought.… Read the rest

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Abraxas: International Art Journal for Esoteric Studies

Abraxas is a high-quality printed journal of esoteric art and culture, published twice a year, specializing in esoteric art and culture. Abraxas is a meeting point among academics, practitioners and curious readers. Abraxas publishes pieces that are clearly presented yet rigorous in quality, so that written scholarship can reach across specialisms and enchant and engage the non-specialist. The art we present is an eclectic mix of contemporary and ancient esoteric visuals presented in the form of interviews, features and critical essays. Abraxas aims to share and publicise the most up-to-date developments in magic and esotericism on all fronts, in research, practice and art. More information on the study of Western Esotericism by Prof. Wouter Hanegraff: http://www.esoteric.msu.edu/Hanegraaff.html

“Contributions for Abraxas #5 include an interview by Pam Grossman with Greek artist, Panos Tsagaris; an analysis of Aby Warburg’s Mnemosyne Atlas by Silvia Urbini, a visual interpretation of the Dionysian mysteries by Arrington de Dionyso; a substantial essay from Shasha Chaitow on the grandfather of esoteric art, Joséphin Péladan; an introduction to the art of Michael Bertiaux by Ariock Van de Voorde; reminiscences by Caroline Wise of her friend Olivia Robertson (1917-2013), and much more.”


An outline of two of the articles you’ll find in issue no.5:

A Brief History of the Use of Spirits in European Occultism
Stephanie Spoto images © Getty Research Centre (Journal double page spread)

Description: This article challenges contemporary ideas about occultism which are perpetuated by the media and which place occult philosophy and ritual as separate from Christianity or else entirely opposed to it.… Read the rest

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Writing Is a Risky, Humiliating Endeavor

A Stipula fountain pen lying on a written piece of paper. By Antonio Litterio via Wikimedia Commons.

A Stipula fountain pen lying on a written piece of paper. By Antonio Litterio via Wikimedia Commons.

I follow the New York Times Opinionator on my Feedly account and this popped up the other day. I thought some of you artist/writer types might find it interesting.

via The New York Times (Please follow the link to read the entire piece):

This essay was born when my ex-wife unfriended me on Facebook. She was angry over my last novel, though to my mind, the resemblances to her and me were superficial. The story — which involves kidnapping, murder, private eyes — was clearly not “about” us. I was shocked and saddened — I’d hoped she would like the book — but this was not the first time I’d had this sort of experience.

My mom had more or less taken ownership of the “Mom” in my first novel, who shared a few of her characteristics, like red hair and a habit of sending notes — but who had some key differences too, like being dead.

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18th Century Mexican Statue of Christ Found to Have Human Teeth

In a new discovery, an 18th Century Mexican statue of Christ is found to have human teeth.

via CNet:

It used to be common for western churches to hold onto human remains: bits of teeth and bone and hair and skin purported to be saintly relics, sometimes holy treasures kept and revered — and sometimes the objects of the fraudulent relic trade.

A new discovery in Mexico, however, is a first for human remains in a church: a statue of Christ has been discovered to have teeth — not teeth carved from animal bone or horn — but actual human teeth.

The 18th century Lord of Patience statue in the parish of San Bartolo Cuautlalpan — known for its gruesome blood and open wounds — was about to undergo restoration at the National School of Restoration, Conservation and Museology. In preparation for the restoration, the team X-rayed the statue, to find eight adult human teeth adorning its mouth.

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Art From the Caddisfly

Gorgeous.

via This Is Colossal:

caddis-gif-2

Right now, in almost every river in the world, some 12,000 different species of caddisfly larvae wriggle and crawl through sediment, twigs, and rocks in an attempt to build temporary aquatic cocoons. To do this, the small, slow-moving creatures excrete silk from salivary glands near their mouths which they use like mortar to stick together almost every available material into a cozy tube. A few weeks later a fully developed caddisfly emerges and almost immediately flies away.

After first learning about caddisflies, self-taught (and self-professed amateur) artist Hubert Duprat had a thought. Had a caddisfly ever naturally encountered a fleck of gold in a river and used it to build a home? And then one step further: what if a caddisfly had only gold and other precious stones or jewels to work with?

drupat-9

Trichoptères, French for the scientific name of the caddisfly, is Duprat’s answer to that question.

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