Tag Archives | Art

Synchromusicology Pt. I : Synchromusicology, Chromotherapy, Synesthesia, and the Aural Current of Electric Audiomancy

First of a five part series by SoundlessdawnEzra Sandzer-Bell

Synchromusicology, Chromotherapy, Synesthesia, and the Aural Current of Electric Audiomancy

Via Youtube:

The rank of Magus is reserved for an elite class of philosophers and metaphysicians who hold the keys to divine knowledge. Mundane, consumer-oriented culture of postmodern Earth has cast down these noble spiritual teachers in the name of hyper-rational materialism. Ancient wisdom is lost amidst the rise of flashy exoteric performance, forcing the magus outward into the exoteric categories of stage (MAG)icians and stage (MUS)icians.

Clues as to the tangible content of a lost musical knowledge are scattered throughout encyclopedias and books on tonal harmony.

Synchromusicologists are a new branch of independent researchers who gather data on the Hidden Origins of Western Music and the power of sympathetic geometry to generate love and to heal wounds. This video offers you the first tastes of what is to come from this school of thought.… Read the rest

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Abraxas: International Art Journal for Esoteric Studies

Abraxas is a high-quality printed journal of esoteric art and culture, published twice a year, specializing in esoteric art and culture. Abraxas is a meeting point among academics, practitioners and curious readers. Abraxas publishes pieces that are clearly presented yet rigorous in quality, so that written scholarship can reach across specialisms and enchant and engage the non-specialist. The art we present is an eclectic mix of contemporary and ancient esoteric visuals presented in the form of interviews, features and critical essays. Abraxas aims to share and publicise the most up-to-date developments in magic and esotericism on all fronts, in research, practice and art. More information on the study of Western Esotericism by Prof. Wouter Hanegraff: http://www.esoteric.msu.edu/Hanegraaff.html

“Contributions for Abraxas #5 include an interview by Pam Grossman with Greek artist, Panos Tsagaris; an analysis of Aby Warburg’s Mnemosyne Atlas by Silvia Urbini, a visual interpretation of the Dionysian mysteries by Arrington de Dionyso; a substantial essay from Shasha Chaitow on the grandfather of esoteric art, Joséphin Péladan; an introduction to the art of Michael Bertiaux by Ariock Van de Voorde; reminiscences by Caroline Wise of her friend Olivia Robertson (1917-2013), and much more.”


An outline of two of the articles you’ll find in issue no.5:

A Brief History of the Use of Spirits in European Occultism
Stephanie Spoto images © Getty Research Centre (Journal double page spread)

Description: This article challenges contemporary ideas about occultism which are perpetuated by the media and which place occult philosophy and ritual as separate from Christianity or else entirely opposed to it.… Read the rest

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Writing Is a Risky, Humiliating Endeavor

A Stipula fountain pen lying on a written piece of paper. By Antonio Litterio via Wikimedia Commons.

A Stipula fountain pen lying on a written piece of paper. By Antonio Litterio via Wikimedia Commons.

I follow the New York Times Opinionator on my Feedly account and this popped up the other day. I thought some of you artist/writer types might find it interesting.

via The New York Times (Please follow the link to read the entire piece):

This essay was born when my ex-wife unfriended me on Facebook. She was angry over my last novel, though to my mind, the resemblances to her and me were superficial. The story — which involves kidnapping, murder, private eyes — was clearly not “about” us. I was shocked and saddened — I’d hoped she would like the book — but this was not the first time I’d had this sort of experience.

My mom had more or less taken ownership of the “Mom” in my first novel, who shared a few of her characteristics, like red hair and a habit of sending notes — but who had some key differences too, like being dead.

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18th Century Mexican Statue of Christ Found to Have Human Teeth

In a new discovery, an 18th Century Mexican statue of Christ is found to have human teeth.

via CNet:

It used to be common for western churches to hold onto human remains: bits of teeth and bone and hair and skin purported to be saintly relics, sometimes holy treasures kept and revered — and sometimes the objects of the fraudulent relic trade.

A new discovery in Mexico, however, is a first for human remains in a church: a statue of Christ has been discovered to have teeth — not teeth carved from animal bone or horn — but actual human teeth.

The 18th century Lord of Patience statue in the parish of San Bartolo Cuautlalpan — known for its gruesome blood and open wounds — was about to undergo restoration at the National School of Restoration, Conservation and Museology. In preparation for the restoration, the team X-rayed the statue, to find eight adult human teeth adorning its mouth.

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Art From the Caddisfly

Gorgeous.

via This Is Colossal:

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Right now, in almost every river in the world, some 12,000 different species of caddisfly larvae wriggle and crawl through sediment, twigs, and rocks in an attempt to build temporary aquatic cocoons. To do this, the small, slow-moving creatures excrete silk from salivary glands near their mouths which they use like mortar to stick together almost every available material into a cozy tube. A few weeks later a fully developed caddisfly emerges and almost immediately flies away.

After first learning about caddisflies, self-taught (and self-professed amateur) artist Hubert Duprat had a thought. Had a caddisfly ever naturally encountered a fleck of gold in a river and used it to build a home? And then one step further: what if a caddisfly had only gold and other precious stones or jewels to work with?

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Trichoptères, French for the scientific name of the caddisfly, is Duprat’s answer to that question.

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Furniture That Looks and Feels Like Human Flesh

I don’t think I’ll be buying the chair and stool anytime soon, but I’d definitely be willing to try it out if ever given the opportunity.

both pieces_1

via Wired:

“Children have been one of the most interesting demographics in relation to the work,” Barker, creator of the skin series and founder of design studio 9191, told Wired.co.uk. “Without any of the hang ups we later develop, they are free to truly explore and interact with the work. Work regarding the human body is very personal and we all have a very immediate reaction to it so the reactions have reflected this.”

The skin stool and skin chair sell for £440 and £1,500 respectively. And in case there was any doubt as to whether furniture that looks, feels and smells like skin (it’s impregnated with human pheromones and aftershave) is on the consumer agenda, Barker’s MA show at Central Saint Martin’s was a sell-out last month and she’s already in talks with retailers.

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Artist Creates Stunning Sculptures From Beehives

I was looking for articles about honeybees to post on True Mind’s Facebook and Twitter accounts, and I came across the artwork of beekeeper Ren Ri. It’s stunning and I thought that the Disinfo community might be interested as well. He creates everything out of bits of beehive and beeswax.

via Alessandro De Toni Cool Hunting:

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Artist Ren Ri (who trained at Tsinghua Academy of Art and Saint Petersburg State University in Russia) creates art that is influenced by his childhood—one that occurred amongst the beautiful scenery of Wuhan’s lush vegetation. “Back then, I was spending a lot of time observing animals and plants; my passion for moulding was parallel to an interest for insect ethology,” he recalls. Thus came the inspiration for his project “Yuansu II” which is crafted from the extraordinary medium of beeswax.

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The artist’s unconventional medium is fascinating and has a life of its own—adding character and volatility to each piece of art.

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A Saga of Shrooms and Nude Modeling

Psilocybin

Psilocybin (Photo credit: Spencer Mann) (CC)

I must give it to this guy, I know from experience that tripping in public is a brave move. I can’t say I have experienced nude modeling though.

via Medium

The great thing about drugs is that they’re an instant cure for boredom. And I’ve been pretty bored lately. Rather than do something constructive, I decided to entertain myself by picking up a half ounce of shrooms and doing some nude modeling at an art studio. I figured it would be an interesting story to tell at the bar afterward with some friends. Maybe have a few drinks, a few laughs, and forget about the whole thing the next day.

 Wrong.

 It’s this kind of impulsive naivete’ that resulted in one of the more horrific and sexually confusing episodes of my life.

 I’m not entirely sure how legal this whole thing is, so I wont get into specifics, but what I can tell you is that the studio I decided on was actually a large theatre in a decent area of town that doubled as both a visual arts center as well as a ritzy cinema.

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“The Thing” – Storyboard to Film Comparison

If you haven’t figured it out through previous posts of mine, I’m fascinated by the ingenuity and brilliance of film directors and the people they work with. I’m biased, but I do think that film is by far the most challenging and rewarding of the arts. It’s one of the only art forms that can easily transcend societal barriers. The only other art I’d consider to have such an effect is music, but what’s unique about cinema is that it’s inclusive of all art forms. You will find that the fine arts, music, photography, and writing all play an integral role in the creation of a quality film.

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Still from the The Thing (1982)

Take for example, The Thing (John Carpenter, 1982). Artist Michael Ploog crafted two of the most visually stunning scenes via beautifully drawn storyboards. In the video below (thanks to Vashi Visuals), you can see the comparison between Ploog’s highly impressive drawings and the brilliant special effects and cinematography of the actual film.… Read the rest

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Communing with the Muse, Letting History be its Sexy Self and Coping with Tragedy. With Philosopher, Author and Top-Notch Human, Daniele Bolelli

Via Midwest Real
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Daniele Bolelli“Once you lose attachment to how you want things to be because you realize you don’t control anything, there’s a curiously liberating aspect of that. I’ve always been a control freak, I’ve always felt that if I try hard enough, everyone I love will be kept safe and everything will be okay. Being shown, in such brutal terms, that that’s simply not the way it works, in someways, it messed me up.  I’ve been through hell, but on another level, if you pile up so much tragedy, it either destroys you, or you just start laughing about it. Because at the end of the day, no one gets out alive.” Daniele Bolelli

When a certain type of person achieves monetary success and notoriety, one of their first moves is to cultivate some sort of bullshit persona.  I’m talking a VIP, tinted window, sunglasses on indoors set of behaviors.  What exactly is that?  I’ll tell you, it’s fear.… Read the rest

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