Tag Archives | Art

Writer and Musician Michael Garfield Discusses Consciousness, Psychedelics, Technology and More on Midwest Real

Via Midwest Real

michaelgarfield.net - more reviews


Michael Garfield can only be described as a polymath. At times, exchanging words with him feels kind of like speaking to a library with a mouth. I’m not really sure how he does it (I promise, I’m not just glad-handing).

Aside from being well-read and spoken, Michael is also something of a serial creative. He’s writer with credits on sites like Big Think and Reality Sandwich, he paints and makes music.

For more on Michael, head to his site.

Photo: Reid Godshaw

For dozens more podcasts like this, head to midwestreal.netDig the show? Stop on by our iTunes channel to review and subscribe.

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Law Enforcement called to defuse tensions at “Magica Sexualis” Art Exhibit in Brooklyn


Gallery Security deals with NYPD who were called to diffuse tensions at reception for “Magica Sexualis” exhibition at Stephen Romano Gallery in Brooklyn.


The NYPD was called to assist with an unruly situation Thursday night at an opening reception of sexually provocative occult artworks at the infamous Stephen Romano Gallery in Brooklyn, NY.

The exhibition entitled “Magica Sexualis” features artworks in various media by international artists, living and dead, including Barry William Hale, Nyahzul, William Mortensen, Steven Bradshaw, Ellen Stagg, Jel Ena, Matthew Dutton, Colin Christian, Steven Baines, Lizz Lopez, Michaelanthony Mandrake and many others. 

There was a warning sign on the door which read: 


The reception was also attended by notable celebrities in the occult world, including the high priest of the Church of Satan with several followers, as well as a former Australian super model  (who has nude photographs in the exhibit), several prominent celebrities who work in the adult entertainment industry, and many other artists whose subject matter is derived from the dark side.Read the rest

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Artificial Killing Machine – Visualizing U.S. military drone strikes

When individuals are represented purely as statistical data, they are stripped of their humanity and our connection to them is severed. Through the act of play and the force of imagination, this project aims to reconnect that which has been lost.

Challenging drone strikes and their dehumanization of victims, Jonathan Fletcher Moore and Fabio Piparo created Artificial Killing Machine, “an autonomous mechanical installation that uses the public database on U.S. military drone strikes to visualise deaths of individuals that would otherwise be represented purely as statistical data.”

Filip Visnjic profiles the installation at Creative Applications:

When a drone strike occurs, the machine activates, and fires a children’s toy cap gun for every death that results. The raw information used by the installation is then printed. The materialised data is allowed to accumulate in perpetuity or until the life cycle of either the database or machine ends. A single chair is placed beneath the installation inviting the viewers to sit in the chair and experience the imagined existential risk.

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Newly Digitized ‘Phenakistoscope’ Animations


Richard Balzer is an early optical device collector, with collections ranging “from camera obscuras and praxinoscopes to anamorphic mirrors and zoetropes.” He’s also amassed quite an interesting collection of phenakistoscopes, early animation devices “that used the persistence of vision principle to create an illusion of motion.”

Balzer and his assistant, Brian Duffy, have digitized these morbidly surreal animation relics.

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The 25 Most Important Zombie Movies Ever Made

dawn of the dead main 25

Jim Vorel via Paste Magazine:

From the living dead to the walking dead to the typing dead, zombies have completely and utterly suffused 21st century culture. And that’s a pretty weird phenomena, when you think about it.

It’s not like this was always the case. Go back to the ’80s, and to wax poetic about George Romero-esque zombie films would have been the hallmark of a nerdy, acne-ridden high school student in a John Hughes movie. The idea that a TV show like The Walking Dead could be one-upping Sunday Night football in TV ratings? That would seem patently impossible.

Yes, zombies have come a long way, as has our appreciation for them. We live in a society that has become profoundly geekier in the last 15 years, and adopted the once secretive and insular totems of geek culture as its own. But it’s not just us who has evolved, it’s the zombies themselves—the creatures, their films and the people who made them.

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Martin Wittfooth’s Offering

Martin Wittfooth "Mothers Milk" 2015

Martin Wittfooth “Mothers Milk” 2015

Martin Wittfooth’s Offering

In Wittfooth’s allegorical narratives, animals roam a dystopian world void of human life with the remnants of industrialized society in a state of devastation. Fires rage and oceans surge but despite the destruction, his creatures radiate and evoke a sentiment of oneness. Where they exist life flourishes and the animals in this sense are the life-givers.

The works in Offering explore the theme of shamanism and its current revitalization around the world. Wittfooth delves into the notion that the rediscovery of shamanistic practices, such as reaching an altered state of consciousness, is peeling away our egos and materialistic obsessions and encouraging a connection with nature and to each other.

The artist explains, “The great challenges of our time primarily stem from the repression, predetermined delineation of consciousness and the myriad of other ways by which our materialistic culture has lost its connection with the natural world…The reemergence of shamanism appears to be having a great impact on consciousness around the globe by severing individuals’ attachments to the ego-driven, ideology-based, monotheistic modality that has shaped so much of the human enterprise over the past millennia.Read the rest

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Jel Ena: Through the Gates of Anhedonia by Decadence Darling

Jel Ena "Sanctum Infernum", 2015

Jel Ena “Sanctum Infernum”, 2015

Jel Ena “Sanctum Infernum”
October 29 – December 15
Stephen Romano Gallery, Brooklyn NY


Jel Ena: Through the Gates of Anhedonia  by Decadence Darling

Death is an unknown pleasure. Pleasure is not the addition of something we are without, it is the realization of something that is within. It is through “death” that we awaken this inherent pleasure. When we seek pleasure, small or large, we examine ourselves accordingly. We take inventory, observe patterns, evaluate and assess strengths and weaknesses. Through all of this we judge ourselves. We determine how much of this information we accept or reject. In other words, seeking pleasure is a process of positive acceptance and negative rejection. But what if those things we are adverse to are a part of who we truly are? To dispose of them would make us incomplete. Perhaps in this pursuit of Self we deny our fullness and the thing we wished we were is an empty object full of pain.… Read the rest

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House of Wax: Anatomical, Pathological, and Ethnographic Waxworks from Castan’s Panopticum, Berlin, 1869-1922

 “Lolita” Wax Figure

“Lolita” Wax Figure


On view:
October 23, 2015 – February 15, 2016
424 Third Ave, in Brooklyn, at the corner of 7th Street.

Curated by Ryan Matthew Cohn of TV’s “Oddities” and staged in conjunction with Alamo Drafthouse with introductory text by Dr. Peter M. McIsaac, Professor of German and Museum Studies at The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

House of Wax will exhibit a selection of  waxworks once shown as part of Castan’s Berlin-based Panopticum (1869-1922). The full collection, never before exhibited in the US, will later be installed at the forthcoming Alamo Drafthouse in Downtown Brooklyn.

Panoptica were popular throughout Europe from the 18th through the early 20th century. Like the dime museums and popular anatomical museums of the US, these largely forgotten spaces fall somewhere between aristocratic cabinets of curiosity and today’s ideas of museums.… Read the rest

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