Tag Archives | Art

The Lost America of Team America


via The Atlantic:

As the geopolitical satire turns 10, it reminds of how much the world has and hasn’t changed.

To remember what the world felt like to a lot of people in the fall of 2004, look no further than the opening scene of Team America: World Police, the South Park-driven marionette action spoof/international affairs crash course/musical that was released during one of the most divisive election seasons ever.

Islamic terrorists are just about to detonate a weapon of mass destruction in Paris before an elite squad of swaggering American puppet commandos confront them. The Americans foil the terrorists’ designs, but not without also laying to fiery waste the Eiffel Tower, the Arc de Triomphe, and the Louvre.

After all the terrorists are dead (one is blasted through the window of a baguette shop) and the Parisians look around mouth-agape at their half-demolished city, one member of Team America gives his Patton speech: “Bonjour, everyone!

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God’s Lonely Programmer

Duncan Verrall (CC BY 2.0)

Duncan Verrall (CC BY 2.0)

via Vice:

In the beginning there is darkness. The screen erupts in blue, then a cascade of thick, white hexadecimal numbers and cracked language, “UnusedStk” and “AllocMem.” Black screen cedes to blue to white and a pair of scales appear, crossed by a sword, both images drawn in the jagged, bitmapped graphics of Windows 1.0-era clip-art—light grey and yellow on a background of light cyan. Blue text proclaims, “God on tap!”

This is TempleOS V2.17, the welcome screen explains, a “Public Domain Operating System” produced by Trivial Solutions of Las Vegas, Nevada. It greets the user with a riot of 16-color, scrolling, blinking text; depending on your frame of reference, it might recall ​DESQview, the ​Commodore 64, or a host of early DOS-based graphical user interfaces. In style if not in specifics, it evokes a particular era, a time when the then-new concept of “personal computing” necessarily meant programming and tinkering and breaking things.

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The Hypnotikon Psychedelic Music Festival is Happening This Weekend

hypnotikonIf you happen to be lucky enough to live in Seattle and are planning on being incredibly high or possibly tripping balls this weekend, might I recommend the second installment of the Hypnotikon psychedelic music festival? Fun fact: the origins of the sort of spiritual writing I’ve been doing on Disinfo for the last several years actually date back to pieces I was writing for musician and visual artist Aubrey Nehring’s Portable Shrines website about 5 years ago. Back then, Nehring and his friends in the utterly brilliant band, Midday Veil, were disappointed with the fact that Seattle was lagging behind other west coast cities like Portland and San Francisco in terms of any sort of cohesive psych rock scene. In an attempt to change that, they organized the two day trance freak out, Escalator Fest. Eventually Nehring (who is doing visuals for Hypnotikon) decided booking festivals wasn’t really his cup of tea, but thankfully local electronic/psych beat writer Dave Segal and his lovely/talented girlfriend Valerie Calano (DJ Veins and Explorateur respectively) seized the mantle and created Hypnotikon, which saw its first incarnation last year.… Read the rest

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Synchromusicology Pt. IV: Symphonic Sorcery, New Aeon Magic, and The Silence Between the Gnosis

“We join spokes together in a wheel,
but it is the center hole
that makes the wagon move.

We shape clay into a pot,
but it is the emptiness inside
that holds whatever we want.

We hammer wood for a house,
but it is the inner space
that makes it a home.

We work with being,
but non-being is what we use.”

– Lao Tzu

 

Via Youtube:

Synchromusicology Pt. IV: Symphonic Sorcery, New Aeon Magic, and The Silence Between the Gnosis

 

Past:

Part I

Part II

Part III

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The Art Of Punk: Crass – The Art of Dave King and Gee Vaucher

From the assaulting black and white photo-realistic paintings of protest, anarchy, and social satire, to their legendary adopted brand and two headed snake and cross symbol. We head up to the Anarchist Book Fair in San Francisco to meet up with Gee Vaucher, and founding Crass member, writer, and activist, Penny Rimbaud. We discuss the art and the lifestyle stemming from the infamous Dial House, where they have lived, worked, and created their own brand of anarchistic beauty, for more than 3 decades. We have a sit down with artist Scott Campbell, at his own New York tattoo shop, and talk about how the art of Crass, and one single t-shirt created a fork in his own road of life. Owen Thornton talks some shit. Finally we hang out with British graphic designer Dave King – the creator of the infamous snake and cross symbol, and discuss post war England, hippies, punk, graphic design, and more, that led him to the creation of the symbol made legend by Crass.

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In Gaza, Palestinians Turn Destruction into Artistic Protest

Painting by Palestinian artist Tayseer Barakat.

Painting by Palestinian artist Tayseer Barakat.

Mariam Elba writes at Waging Nonviolence:

As the Israeli war against Gaza unfolded last summer, I wrote about a particular artist who has turned pictures of Israeli bombs falling on Gaza into graphic art of people mourning the destruction below them. Now the destruction caused by the bombs is itself being turned into art. Well-known Palestinian artist Raed Issa has been displaying his damaged paintings that were buried in the remains of his home in front of the rubble of his house. He is part of a group of artists called Eltiqa in Gaza that supports artists in producing art that responds to the realities of daily life in the occupied territory.

In addition, groups of young people are practicing difficult parkour moves among the rubble that remains from last summer. While the artistic exercise routine known as parkour is not new in Palestine, what these youth are doing by practicing it among the rubble of destroyed homes and schools is showing not only incredible resilience, but also constructing a narrative of resistance and endurance.

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The Leonardo Hidden from Hitler in Case it Gave Him Magic Powers

WARNING: Viewing this Leonard da Vinci selfie may imbue you with special powers:

Leonardo da Vinci - presumed self-portrait - WGA12798.jpg
People actually believed this enough to go to great lengths to keep it away from Adolf Hitler, who was famously interested in the occult. The story from BBC News:

One of the world’s most famous self-portraits is going on rare public display in the northern Italian city of Turin. Very little is known about the 500-year-old, fragile, fading red chalk drawing of Leonardo da Vinci but some believe it has mystical powers.

There is a myth in Turin that the gaze of Leonardo da Vinci in this self-portrait is so intense that those who observe it are imbued with great strength.

Some say it was this magical power, not the cultural and economic value of the drawing, that led to it being secretly moved from Turin and taken to Rome during World War Two – heaven forbid it should ever fall into Hitler’s hands and give him more power.

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