Tag Archives | Art

SittingNow TV – Carl Abrahamsson: Go Forth and Let Your Brain Halves Procreate

SittingNow TV Re-emerges blinking into the daylight. This, the first of three final additions to Scarlet Imprints ‘Pleasure Dome’ event a while back, heralds the dawn of a new video age for SittingNow…keep em peeled!

We return with a Magickal presentation by Occultist Carl Abrahamsson dissects the intersection between Esoteric traditions, and the arts. All hail the Mega-Golem!

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Salvation Mountain Creator Leonard Knight Dies At 82

salvation mountainThe Los Angeles Times reports the death of an eccentric visionary who assembled his own psychedelic-religious portal to another dimension out in the desert of California:
Leonard Knight, the lean New Englander who spent three decades joyously painting religious messages on a tall mound of adobe he called Salvation Mountain in the Imperial Valley desert, died Monday at age 82. His death was announced on his Salvation Mountain Facebook page by his devoted followers who have been attempting to preserve his labor of love east of the Salton Sea near the squatter village called Slab City. Until his health declined, Knight had lived in the back of his truck, sharing his space with a variety of cats without names, undeterred by the brutal desert heat or howling winds. To his amazement, Knight had become a favorite of folk art aficionados.
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The Anarchist-Marxist Sport Of The Future: Three-Sided Football

threeAmerican football it will be played in the Super Bowl is clearly a metaphor for the conquering of territory by force, a reenactment of the nation's creation. Is it time for a national sport with different theoretical meaning? Wikipedia on three-sided football:
Played on a hexagonal pitch with three teams instead of two, it was devised by the Danish Situationist Asger Jorn to explain his notion of triolectics, his refinement on the Marxian concept of dialectics, as well as to disrupt one's everyday idea of football. The game deconstructs the confrontational and bi-polar nature of conventional football as an analogy of class struggle in which the referee stands as a signifier of the state and media apparatus, posturing as a neutral arbitrator in the political process of ongoing class struggle. The first known game was organized by the London Psychogeographical Association as part of the Glasgow Anarchist Summer School.  
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Down at the Crossroads: Interview with Artist, Author and Witch Sarah Anne Lawless

Down at the Crossroads— Podcast: #039 — Sarah Anne Lawless

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039_sarah_ann_lawlessThank you for joining me Down at the Crossroads where we have the conversations that the pagan community needs to have.  Because as you know, we are, “Pagan culture for the Seasoned Pagan.”  Tonight, we meet with beloved occult artist, author, blogger, and witch Sarah Anne Lawless who is known for her artwork and her long-time running blog which can now be found at her website sarahannelawless.com.

A professional artist, writer, and witch, Sarah’s work has been published in various books, magazines, and online in The CauldronHex MagazineWitches & Pagans, WitchvoxSerpent Songs, and Hoofprints in the Wildwood. She is a carver, painter, and illustrator working in the mediums of bone, wood, ink and paint creating original artwork, talismans, and ritual tools. Sarah is an animist, initiated witch, and wortcunner with a love of otherworldly beauty, folklore, mythology, poisonous plants, wildcrafting, wild places, and bones.

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How Hunter S. Thompson and Psilocybin Influenced the Art of Ralph Steadman

ralph-steadman-fear-and-loathing-in-las-vegas-by-hunter-s-thompsonOpen Culture revisits the influence of Hunter S. Thompson on the art of Ralph Steadman.

Via Open Cuture.

Though the two men only occasionally collaborated over their long friendship, the work of Kentucky-born “gonzo” journalist Hunter S. Thompson and that of British illustrator Ralph Steadman enjoy a cultural symbiosis: Thompson’s style of writing puts you in the mind of Steadman’s style of drawing, and vice versa even more so. At this point, I have a hard time imagining any suitable visual accompaniment to the simultaneously clear- and wild-eyed sensibility of Thompsonian prose — “I hate to advocate drugs, alcohol, violence, or insanity to anyone,” he famously said, “but they’ve always worked for me” — other than the bold strokes and violent blotches with which Steadman renders visions of highly controlled madness. The clip above, from Alex Gibney’s documentary Gonzo: The Life and Work of Dr. Hunter S. Thompson, explores the origins of their aesthetic and psychological partnership.

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In A World Full Of Street Artists, Taggers And Vandals, Should Banksy Get A Free Pass?

Pic: Nola Defender

Pic: Nola Defender

Celebrated street artist Banksy’s famous painting of a girl standing under an umbrella was defaced with red spray paint over the holiday. (It is currently being restored.) The identity of the vandal or vandals is as yet unknown, and will probably remain so given the at best legally ambiguous nature of Banksy’s work. While Banksy’s paintings are appreciated by many, the defacement provokes this question: Should his work be considered sacrosanct?

By choosing public space as his canvas, he is operating in a living, competitive environment: a rich artistic biome full of taggers, street artists, sloganeers and run of the mill vandals. Defacing or modifying the work of competitors is par for the course in this Darwinian milieu. Should we, as Banksy’s audience, be any more outraged when his work is defaced than we would be when another street artist has his labor destroyed?

It can be argued that the public outcry is symptomatic of personal identification with a brand and acceptance of its commodification.… Read the rest

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Psychoactive Soundscapes: The Trippiest Albums of 2013

sacredsigilservitor2A lot of the problem with viewing the universe as being comprised of matter comes with the idea that it’s devoid of conscious experience somehow. More and more, little by little, we’re starting to wake up to the insane limitations of this philosophy. Renders people humorless if you ask me. Nothing adds up, which creates profound existential desperation resonating throughout the collective psi-grid of humanity. There is no explanation for why anything happens, so we instead focus on how things go down in obsessive detail. Not to knock this approach, as it creates order by combining with the mystical chaos of internal infinity. Too much mystic psychic sizzle and you’ll get torn to shreds, but when you look at only shared perceptual experience, you’re editing out the vast majority of reality. It’s all dark matter through those eyes. Endless blacked out pages on a declassified UFO report.

What I’ve found is that by shifting models of reality interpretation just slightly from conceiving the world as being made of matter to one comprised from conscious experience, coherent macro concepts of conjoined narratives learning lessons throughout cycles of shifting lifetimes starts to take shape (which I talk about all the time on Facebook; friend me).… Read the rest

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The Failed Smell Concert Of Sadakichi Hartmann

sadakichiMovies and music are filled with sight and sound, but when will humanity master the expressive and exploratory power of the other senses? The Believer on an ill-fated pre-Surrealist attempt to transport a theater full of people to Japan via a series of perfumes projected by fan:

In the fall of 1902, when he was around thirty-five years old, the papers announced that Mr. Sadakichi Hartmann, the eccentric art critic, would present a short performance entitled “A Trip to Japan in Sixteen Minutes.” The piece was described as a “melody in odors.”

The turn of the twentieth century saw a flurry of sense experimentation. The color organ was patented in 1895, an instrument with colored panels that lit up and changed in time to music. A few years later, one of the first electric organs, the Telharmonium, would have its debut in a specially built concert hall in New York.

The perfume concert was the featured event on a bill of a casual Sunday pop, held at the enormous entertainment complex known as the New York Theatre.

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William Blake’s Super-Trippy Illustrations For ‘Paradise Lost’

BlakeSinDeathDevilOpen Culture spotlights William Blake’s surrealistic illustrations inspired by Milton’s Paradise Lost. Blake was a fascinating character: An Outsider Artist before there was such a term. A mystic, poet and cultural radical (a 19th century advocate of “free love” among other notions), one wonders why there haven’t been a successful biographical film about this revolutionary figure.

 

 

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