Tag Archives | Art

Self-Portraits Made From Human Blood


Every 5 years, artist Marc Quinn creates a mould of his head using his blood and silicone. Each week a doctor draws a pint of blood from Quinn which he then freezes to save for his next mould. He estimates that he uses about 260 pints for each project.

via Quinn’s site:

Self is a self-portrait of the artist, but one that literally uses his body as material since the cast of Quinn’s head, immersed in frozen silicone, is created from ten pints of his own blood. In this way, the materiality of the sculpture has both a symbolic and real function. The work was made at a time when Quinn was an alcoholic and a notion of dependency – of things needing to be plugged in or connected to something to survive – is apparent since the work needs electricity to retain its frozen appearance. A further iteration made every five years, this series of sculptures presents a cumulative index of passing time and an ongoing self-portrait of the artist’s ageing and changing self.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

Time Travel & The Multiverse – Many Worlds: Many Timelines


Marie D. Jones & Larry Flaxman – New Dawn via Waking Times:

Time travel has enchanted and intrigued us since the earliest days of fiction, when authors such as H.G. Wells, Samuel Madden, Charles Dickens and Enrique Gaspar y Rimbau stretched and challenged our imaginations with images and tales of men and women who invented amazing machines and devices that could take them back in time, or forward into the future. Because of the restrictions of light speed, and the paradoxes of going back to the past without damaging the future timeline, and a host of other obstacles and challenges, we, in fact, have remained stuck in the present.

Our scientific knowledge and technological achievement has yet to catch up to the limitless dreams of our imaginations. But perhaps just because we have yet to achieve time travel in our universe, in our particular point along the cosmic arrow of time, doesn’t mean it isn’t achievable… and maybe the key is the universe itself.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

The Surprisingly Mysterious Life of Bob Ross

Bob Ross was an iconic American painter. Not for his ability to command the brush or fabulous wealth but for his mellow, mellow presence and penchant for the Afro hair style.

And, of course, the Happy Little Trees.

Not much is actually known about the man, however. Today I found Out tries to sort the murky details:


Born in Daytona Florida in 1942, Ross was the child of a carpenter (Jack) and a waitress (Ollie) who separated, married other people, separated from those new partners and then got married to each other again all before their son had hit his teens. As a child, Ross entertained himself by caring for injured animals, much to the chagrin of his parents who soon became used to coming home to find an injured alligator in their bathtub or an armadillo running around Ross’ room.

Education wise, Ross left school in the 9th grade to support himself as a carpenter with his father, during which time he lost the tip of his left index finger in an accident, an injury he later hid from viewers most of the time with his paint palette.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

Psy-Op: Executive Order Creates an Orwellian Policy of Enlightenment and Propaganda


This article originally appeared on Activist Post.

By Daisy Luther

The ink is still wet on a brand new executive order that reads like a cross between the Reich’s Ministry of Enlightenment and Propaganda and George Orwell’s Ministry of Truth.

Of course, in true propagandist form, President Obama isn’t calling it anything related to Nazi Germany or a dystopian novel.   He’s calling it “Using Behavioral Science Insights to Better Serve the American People.”

To-may-to. To-mah-to.

Whatever you want to call it, prepare to be the subject of manipulation and behavioral experiments. This is a giant, official national psy-op and they’re announcing to us that they’re doing it.

What’s a Psy-Op?

Psychological Operations or PSYOP are planned operations to convey selected information and indicators to audiences to influence their emotions, motives, objective reasoning, and ultimately the behavior of organizations, groups, and individuals. (source)

(You can learn more about the use of Psy-Ops in this US Army procedural manual.)

The beginning of the Executive Order explains:

A growing body of evidence demonstrates that behavioral science insights — research findings from fields such as behavioral economics and psychology about how people make decisions and act on them — can be used to design government policies to better serve the American people.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

20 Terrible Scientists in TV and Film


Louisa Walker via Den of Geek:

Indiana Jones is a great movie character, but a terrible scientist. Here are 19 more for your consideration…

Scientists can get a bad rap in films and TV. As Sheldon from The Big Bang Theory utters “it’s amazing how many supervillains have advanced degrees.” They are often the source of a lot of the troubles that the heroes face, either through lab accidents or a slight megalomania problem. As science is being increasingly used in films to explain strange goings-on, I thought it worth looking for the examples of scientists in films who give our job a bad name.

So, some ground rules first.

The definition of “worst” in this list can relate to simply being bad at science. However, there is an inherent understanding in the world of science that your work should be conducted to an ethical code. Science in general is geared towards helping people or improving the world, through things such as finding ways to cure diseases or developing technology to make people’s lives easier.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

The A=432 Hz Frequency: DNA Tuning and the Bastardization of Music


Brendan D. Murphy via Waking Times:

GA=440Hz: Not Quite Music to My Ears

Humankind is the largely unwitting victim of afrequency war on our consciousness that has been waged for decades, if not millennia. The goal has clearly been to keep us as gullible and subservient as possible, through multifarious means.

In modern history in particular, there has been what Dr. Len Horowitz has referred to as the strategic “militarization” of music. This happened in 1939 when the tuning of the note ‘A above Middle C’ to 440 Hz was adopted in the world of music. In 1910 an earlier push to effect the same change was met with limited success. Three decades later, the British Standards Institute (BSI) adopted the A=440Hz standard following staunch promotion by the Rockefeller-Nazi consortium—“at the precise time WWII preparations were being finalized by the petrochemical-pharmaceutical war financiers.”[i] This was the year that A=440 became the international standard.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

Infinite Lust

Another gorgeous video from animator Emanuele Kabu.

These are all places we’ve been together.

With our bodies, or with my mind.

Some I saw with my eyes closed,
And some with both our eyes, either open or closed.

They are memories of lovemaking, planning, projecting.

You were there, but maybe we were never really there.

In those places, and in my mind. In those places in my mind.

I made this video to free some space.
To move those places out of my mind.

I had to put them down.

Over four months and thousands of hours of drawing,
Here are fifteen years of sweetness and lust.

And a bit of pain.

Read the rest

Continue Reading

David Foster Wallace on Ambition

“If your fidelity to perfectionism is too high, you never do anything.” – David Foster Wallace

Interview by Leonard Lopate, WNYC: March 4, 1996

David Foster Wallace: You know, the whole thing about perfectionism. The perfectionism is very dangerous, because of course if your fidelity to perfectionism is too high, you never do anything. Because doing anything results in— It’s actually kind of tragic because it means you sacrifice how gorgeous and perfect it is in your head for what it really is. And there were a couple of years where I really struggled with that.

David Foster Wallace: I played serious tennis when I was a child. I played it enough to start to feel like it was beautiful.

Leonard Lopate: You were 17th in the United States Tennis Association Western Section when you were 14 years old…

David Foster Wallace: That sounds very impressive. That’s a regional ranking and it means that I was probably 4,000th in the nation for my age group.… Read the rest

Continue Reading