Tag Archives | Art

Is there a Self in Selfies?

Agnes Martin's Gabriel Still

What is the significance of taking a selfie? Philosopher Alexander García Düttmann explores the potential of the selfie as both a feature of the culture industry and as a creative act in the work of Walt Whitman and Agnes Martin.


Alexander García Düttmann at Four by Three Magazine:

The answer is probably: no, it is unlikely that there is a self in selfies. As one gives this answer, well aware that perhaps no one cares for the kind of self one is denying to the image called selfie, a faint echo makes itself heard, the echo of an aphorism Adorno coined in the 1940s. It reads: “In many people it is already an impertinence to say ‘I’.”[1]

But does it matter? Must one appeal to some deeper, or more authentic, sense of selfhood, to an I that escapes the selfie’s eye, and ridicule an expression that refers more to an act than to an entity, to the act of stretching out one’s arms, of using a prosthesis with a small and handy camera attached to its extremity and of catching a digital glimpse of oneself, a glimpse contained in, and forming on the surface of, the artifact’s screen, an image immediately available to viewing?… Read the rest

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Alessia Iannetti – Penetrated by a Nocturnal Mysticism

all

Photography by Eleonora Grasso

Artist’s Statement:

Alessia Iannetti was born in Carrara (Italy) in 1985 and graduated at the Academy of Fine Arts where she had the opportunity to study with the famous Artist and Professor Omar Galliani from whom she inherited the complex graphite on board technique as “Estigmate” of the most fascinating contemporary illustration, with its cinematographic views and close ups made of blacks and whites and infinite variations of gray, that give back to the monochrome and the drawing the excellence of intensity.
 As a reply to modern conceptual language, no more so deeply contemporary, Alessia Iannetti, already placed between the most interesting artists from New Pop and New Surrealism international scene, offers a high cultured Art, which is aware of its figurative turn and proudly follows the ironical and surrealistic aspects of Neoclassicism movement.

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Which Life Form Dominates Earth?

Springtails can be smaller than a pinhead (Credit: Sinclair Stammers / NPL)

Springtails can be smaller than a pinhead (Credit: Sinclair Stammers / NPL)

Nic Fleming Via BBC:

We humans tend to assume we rule the Earth. With our advanced tool making, language, problem solving and social skills, and our top predator status, we like to think of ourselves as the dominant life form on the planet.

But are we?

There are organisms that are significantly more numerous, cover more of the Earth’s surface and make up more of its living biomass than us. We are certainly having major impacts in most corners of the globe and on its other inhabitants.

But are there are other living things that are quietly having greater, more significant influences? Who or what is really in charge?

If world domination is a numbers game, few can compare with tiny six-legged, shrimp-like springtails, or Collembola. Ranging from 0.25-10mm in length, there are typically around 10,000 per square metre of soil, rising to as many as 200,000 per square metre in some places.

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The Good, The Bad and The Robot: Experts Are Trying to Make Machines Be “Moral”

I, Robot coverCoby McDonald Via California Magazine:

Good vs. bad. Right vs. wrong. Human beings begin to learn the difference before we learn to speak—and thankfully so. We owe much of our success as a species to our capacity for moral reasoning. It’s the glue that holds human social groups together, the key to our fraught but effective ability to cooperate. We are (most believe) the lone moral agents on planet Earth—but this may not last. The day may come soon when we are forced to share this status with a new kind of being, one whose intelligence is of our own design.

Robots are coming, that much is sure. They are coming to our streets as self-driving cars, to our military as automated drones, to our homes as elder-care robots—and that’s just to name a few on the horizon (Ten million households already enjoy cleaner floors thanks to a relatively dumb little robot called the Roomba).

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Death Is The Road To Awe: The Art of Joseph McVetty.

Visions Of The Reverend Mother, 35''x46'' Latex paint, gouache, and pencil on paper.

Visions Of The Reverend Mother, 35”x46” Latex paint, gouache, and pencil on paper.

Joseph McVetty is an artist and illustrator living and working in Portland, Oregon. The masked participants of these drawings are acting out communal rituals involving new age occult signifiers such as crystals, chakras, energy fields, levitation, and conjuring. Each drawing aims to evoke the feelings associated with the cultish, drop-out supernaturalism, and homespun magic.

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Disinformation featured artist: Mu Pan and Humanity’s Fundamental Need for Narrative

spider_woman

Spider Woman。2015. 30″ x 44″Acrylic on paper.

Artist Statement

Mu Pan, born 1976, lives in Brooklyn NY

My work is quite simply about telling stories; stories in actual history, stories in imaginative history, and stories about human nature. I strongly believe in humanity’s fundamental need for narrative in visual imagery. To tell my stories, I often utilize animal forms, anthropomorphic or otherwise, in an effort to show the viewer the folly of human beings and the boundless power of animals. I draw references from the histories of China, Japan, and the United States, all of which have had a huge influence on my upbringing. Having been born into a military family, I am fascinated by battle scenes. Many such scenes in my work point to the irrevocable mistakes humans have made in the past. I re-create the historical scenarios in my own interpretation, perhaps to lament what we can no longer make up for, or perhaps to imagine that justice can prevail, if only in my image.… Read the rest

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Against Imagination

deleuze

Does imagination create or distort our experience of the world? Oxford scholar Reidar Due turns to Spinoza, Deleuze and Kant, in order to establish imagination's relation to philosophy, the arts and science and ask: Does imagination liberate us or alienate us from reality, others and ourselves?


Reidar Due via Four by Three Magazine:

One often thinks that imagination is a good thing, that is, one thinks it is better to have imagination than not. Someone who is said to have no imagination is meant to be dull, erotically numb, politically astute etc. In this sense, to us moderns’, imagination is a placeholder for other positive values. It stands for freedom and receptivity, transcendence and innovation, excitement and inspiration. It is noteworthy that neither Ancient Greek philosophers nor Latin Medieval philosophers spent much time discussing imagination. The value of imagination is tied to the notion that truth and poetic creativity are dependent on novelty. It is against this background that Spinoza formulates a powerful critique of imagination along several axes. On the one hand, the imaginative psychological attitudes of hope and fear are ethically destructive, because they orient themselves towards that, which does not exist. On the other hand, ideas that we have about other people are often caused, not by an appreciation of them in their own right, but by an articulation of the effect that they have upon us. Hence we like and dislike people, because we imagine them, on the basis of our own vulnerable self-esteem, to be such and such, whereas they may be, in fact, very different. Finally, an intellectual grasp of reality, an adequate intellectual appropriation of nature, takes the form of conceptual or intuitive thinking, neither of which involves imagination. From Spinoza we thus get the view that imagination serves to imprison the subject within its own private thought and to bar the way towards an adequate appreciation of reality. The same perceptive is presented by the twentieth century philosopher Gilles Deleuze.

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Harmonia Macrocosmica — History’s Most Beautiful Star Maps

The Harmonia Macrocosmica is a star atlas written by Andreas Cellarius and published in 1660 by Johannes Janssonius.

The Harmonia Macrocosmica is a star atlas written by Andreas Cellarius and published in 1660 by Johannes Janssonius.

The Harmonia Macrocosmica is a star atlas written by Andreas Cellarius and published in 1660 by Johannes Janssonius.

 

The first part of the atlas contains copper plate prints depicting the world systems of Claudius Ptolemy, Nicolaus Copernicus and Tycho Brahe. At the end are star maps of the classical and Christian constellations, the latter ones as introduced by Julius Schiller in his Coelum stellatum christianum of 1627. The translations are by dr. Henry A.I. Stadhouders (Theological Institute, University of Utrecht).

In the foreword to his Chronologica, Gerard Mercator stated the intention to publish an atlas which would cover everything of the then-known cosmos, geography and history of the earth. During his life, Mercator published five volumes of his atlas, the last one being published by his son Rumold. After Mercator’s death, the Amsterdam cartographerJohannes Janssonius took over the project.… Read the rest

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Why Are White Men Touching Art?

Katie Tegtmeyer (CC by 2.0)

Katie Tegtmeyer (CC by 2.0)

Ry Molloy writes at the Huffington Post:

It’s opening night at the gallery, and the stress level is high. Directors run around trying to appease the donors, the caterers maneuver carts through the crowded floor, and the guests flood the space and pouring through the new shows.

Meanwhile I’m stationed at my post, neck on a jittery swivel as I attempt to monitor five hundred square feet of space. My job is that of a sign, reminding all: Do Not Touch.

The main objects of concern are a set of sculptures by a black male artist from LA. Sea Pigs, as they are titled, the pieces are made of reclaimed buoys hung from the ceiling and covered in layers of acrylic medium, paper and bungee cord. Though abstract sculpture may not lend itself to written description, the point stands that the room is littered with bovine-sized sculptures dangling at shoulder height and begging to be touched.

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