Tag Archives | Art

‘Exordium’: A Retro-Style Swords and Sorcery Animated Film


Do you have a jones for wizards, sword fighting, and cosmic visions?

This project is rotoscoped animation in the style of Ralph Bakshi’s The Lord of the Rings and Fire & Ice (though certainly a bit of Heavy Metal and He-Man made its way in, too). The live action portion of the process began filming a year ago, to the day, of this submission. The film stars Jon Tomlinson, and was co-directed by Josh Jones. It was written, co-directed, drawn by hand in Photoshop, and animated in Premiere, by Morgan Galen King. The music featured is by the incredible bands Strand of Oaks and Ice Dragon, with additional music by Jonn Ollsin of The Family Band.

http://www.gorgonaut.net/

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A Plan To Have Humans Give Birth To Dolphins And Then Eat Them

Is this what will give your life meaning? In his project I Wanna Deliver A Dolphin, designer Ai Hasegawa envisions solving food shortages, the endangered species crisis, and our urge to reproduce by having us give birth to dolphins via synthetic placentas…and then consume their meat.
The struggle to raise a child in decent conditions is becoming harder due to gross overpopulation and an increasingly strained global environment. Would a woman consider incubating and giving birth to an endangered species such as a shark, tuna or dolphin? This project imagines a point in the future, where humans will help this species by the advanced technology of synthetic biology. A ‘dolp-human placenta’ that allows a human female to deliver a dolphin is created, and thus humans can become a surrogate mother to endangered species. Furthermore, gourmets would be able to enjoy the luxury of eating a rare animal: an animal made by their own body.
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The First Ancient Human Artists Were Women

handprints

Did women invent art? National Geographic reports:

Women made most of the oldest-known cave art paintings, suggests a new analysis of ancient handprints. Most scholars had assumed these ancient artists were predominantly men, so the finding overturns decades of archaeological dogma.

Archaeologist Dean Snow analyzed hand stencils found in eight cave sites in France and Spain. Snow determined that three-quarters of the handprints were female. Women tend to have ring and index fingers of about the same length, whereas men’s ring fingers tend to be longer than their index fingers.

“People have made a lot of unwarranted assumptions about who made these things, and why,” said Snow, whose research was supported by the National Geographic Society’s Committee for Research and Exploration.

Because many of these early paintings showcase game animals, many researchers have proposed that they were made by male hunters. The new study suggests otherwise.

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KALI-YUGA: An Interview with Graphic Novelist Benton Rooks

I digitally “sat down” on my flight from LA to interview Benton Rooks, an old friend and author of the exciting new indie graphic novel, KALI-YUGA:
kaliyuga01

“KALI-YUGA is an epic dark fantasy/sci-fi graphic novel trilogy concerning the fate of the heroic, time traveling wizard named Abaraiis, who is born as a 500 year old man.”

As the name suggests, Benton’s artistic directions implicitly explore esoteric and mythological dimensions of our time. I wanted to hear more about how these ideas played into the creation of KALI-YUGA.

Here is our conversation.

Note! My readers should also see Benton’s Kickstarter campaign for KALI-YUGA. If the spirit so moves you, consider donating a little something to support this fantastic indie art project:

KALI-YUGA: Issue 1

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JJ: How do you situate yourself, as an artist, in a hyper-mediated, rampantly technologized time? From the looks of it, KALI-YUGA explores both mythology and some epic-sized science fiction.Read the rest

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Jean Perdrizet’s Metaphysical Blueprints From The Future

Art Brut / collection ABCD on the otherworldly creations of Jean Perdrizet, who designed languages, scales, and devices bridging the gap between the human world and the realms of ghosts, aliens, and astral planes:

Jean Perdrizet (1907-1975) was employed as a combat engineer in Grenoble, then at Électricité de France from 1944 to 1949. Around 1955 he became an “inventor”. He started to invent prototypes and draw plans of machines to communicate with the ghosts or aliens : an “electric ouija”, a “thermoelectronic net for the ghosts”, a “Robot cosmonaut”, “space scale”, an “imagination cursor”, a “flying pipe”. He also invented a universal language, the so-called “T language”. He sent his studies to NASA, CNRS and the Swedish Royal Academy of Sciences. His work attracted the attention of scientists but also of those who refuse the omnipotence of rationalist thought.

jean Perdrizet

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Bypassing the Rational: An Interview with Artist and Writer Sean Woodward

Baron Cemeterie

Baron Cemeterie

Sean Woodward is a visionary artist, writer, poet and musician whose work incorporates  aspects of Vodoun, Thelema and Chaos Magick, among other things. You can learn more about him and his work here.

 

Aonie Anfa: Thanks so much for the opportunity to speak with you. Your art started popping up among my friends about three months ago. It’s very compelling, visionary yet visceral. So I took a look, and found my way to a lot of great, boutique presses and publications like Scarlet Imprint. And of course, your art. Your work with Gnostic Vodoun helps bring about, in my opinion, a much needed period of new, fresh influence for the current.

Sean Woodward: As a child I inherited artistic abilities from both parents and honed a skill for portraiture landscape and pen and ink. Over the years this became dormant as I concentrated on writing and music projects with my band Gothick.… Read the rest

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Bauhaus Surrealist Prisons Of The Spanish Civil War

prisonNot that I condone mental torture, but there is something appealing about anarchists using modern art as a weapon against the fascist war machine. From the Guardian archives:

A Spanish art historian has uncovered what was alleged to be the first use of modern art as a deliberate form of torture — mind-bending prison cells were built by anarchist artists 65 years ago during the country’s bloody civil war.

Bauhaus artists, as well as the surrealist Luis Bunuel and his friend Salvador Dali, were said to be the inspiration behind a series of secret cells built in Barcelona and elsewhere.

Most were the work of an enthusiastic French anarchist, Alphonse Laurencic, who invented a form of “psychotechnic” torture, according to the research of the historian Jose Milicua.

Mr Milicua’s information came from a written account of Laurencic’s trial before a Francoist military tribunal. Laurencic, a painter, created his so-called “coloured cells” as a contribution to the fight against General Franco’s rightwing rebel forces.

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DragonCon 2013 Exclusive: The Transmedia of Tomorrow

Exclusive: DragonCon 2013 – The Transmedia of Tomorrow: The Art That Lies To Tell The Truth

01-dragonconlogoFiction and non-fiction, fact and myth, often aren’t opposites.

These lines blend a little more every day. When these things play such a crucial role in our news as well as entertainment media, and in a world where social media platforms are often at the front lines of cultural revolutions, it is increasingly necessary that these things are understood. Join us for a discussion on this topic, along with links to a variety of articles that expand upon and support the limited amount that can be discussed in a 45 minute panel.

This three person panel is a truncated transcript of the initial Dragon*Con discussion, moderated by David Metcalfe. The other two participants were transmedia artist James Curcio and Damien Williams, who you may have caught at one of many other panels at Dragon*Con this year including “How To Be a Comics Scholar,” “Devouring Selfhood: Zombies In Narrative,” “Gender, Race, and Identities in Comics,” and many others.Read the rest

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