Tag Archives | Arts

Music Video: ‘Fight For Everyone’

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to have omnipotent powers of creation, and to do it all through touch screen abilities?

‘Fight For Everyone’ Music Promo from Persistent Peril on Vimeo.

‘Fight For Everyone’ music promo for The Leisure Society.

A hand creates life on a little bluey-greeny planet, only things don’t quite go as planned. Miniature animated destruction ensues.

Read the rest

Continue Reading

Music Video: Elk Grass

The natural/ethereal beauty of this music video, matched with the hauntingly mellow music bring about ideas of making it through a shamanic ordeal or something like that.

Elk Grass from awesome and modest on Vimeo.

Music video for the song Elk Grass by Pete Van Leeuwen. Featuring the backup vocal stylings of Suzanna Choffel. Produced and engineered by Tim Edgar.

Directed by Awesome + modest.

 

Read the rest

Continue Reading

Documentary: Speak of the Devil (1995)

This is a documentary on Anton LaVey and the Church of Satan

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aA5_Xk5nr4E

“Yeah, well, I’m crazy, but I’m not stupid, hopefully. And I think we’re all a bit crazy if we do anything that’s deviant. I’ve studied a great deal on deviance and aberrant behavior. Most of the interesting people I’ve ever met have been deviant in one form or another.”

Read the rest

Continue Reading

Don’t Move: Short Film

DON’T MOVE – Short Horror from BloodyCuts.co.uk on Vimeo.

Set on one fateful night, six friends gather for their monthly ‘games night’… and accidentally unleash a demonic force that might tear them – and their friendships – to pieces.

‘Don’t Move’ is the 8th slice in Bloody Cuts‘ anthology of short horror films, made by a team of UK film-makers on low budgets. Directed by Anthony Melton, written by David Scullion, produced by Ben Franklin and with cinematography by Jonny Franklin, it stars Rachel Bright and Jake Hendriks alongside Kate Braithwaite, Beth Cooper, Ian Whyte, Calvin Dean and Martin Skipper.

Read the rest

Continue Reading

What ‘Hair’ Can Teach Us About Current Social Justice Struggles

Agnieszka Karoluk writes at Diatribe Media:

I was about 11 or 12 years old and my father was so excited to finally let me watch his favorite movie, Hair (based off the 1968 Broadway musical of the same title). The opening scene shows a young man from farmland Oklahoma saying goodbye to his father as he gets on a bus to New York City. What follows is a psychedelic story of rebellion, love, loss, sex, drugs and every human emotion you can imagine all packed into a musical frenzy of hippies and yuppies, military men and hustlers.

For those of you who have never seen it, the young Oklahoman travels to New York City because he was chosen in the draft and needed to report to the U.S. Army base. On his first day in the city, he meets a group of hippies: Wolf, Hud, Janie and Berger. Along with these four, Claude Bukowski gets into all sorts of mischief and mishaps including a few drug-induced adventures and dreams, falling in love with a daughter of a high-society man and a few ethical dilemmas.

Read the rest
Continue Reading