To say that I have a family history of mental illness would be an understatement: I’ve got a long, storied family history of men putting shotguns in their mouths and pulling the…

For me, the accusations of government conspiracy that a certain loudmouthed radio host promoted immediately following the Aurora massacre did more to rubbish any conspiracy theory that he and his followers espouse…

[disinfo ed.’s note: this was first published on April 21, 2009. We have republished it in the midst of the current debate regarding mass murder, gun control, conspiracies and more regarding the Aurora, Colorado shooting incident, in the hope that it can provide some perspective.]

Russ Kick writes in Everything You Know Is Wrong: The mass shooting at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colorado still stands as the most infamous school shooting in US history. It remains seared into the public psyche as the archetypal school shooting.

Despite the controversies it triggered (provoking arguments about guns, Marilyn Manson, bullying, and parental responsibility, among many other topics) and the subsequent incidents and near-incidents it inspired, many unanswered questions swirl around the events of April 20, 1999.

Read and/or download this article on Scribd.

The bodies in Aurora, Colorado weren’t even cold before the inevitable conspiracy theories began to propagate in the bacterial petri dish that is the internet. While most people are content to let the investigation into the Dark Knight Rises murder spree evolve under the auspices of local and federal law enforcement, there exists a fringe for whom no amount of physical distance from, or baseless conjecture about, a national tragedy is too far to not support unlikely theories of United Nations false-flag attacks and other tinfoil cap speculations.

The current conspiracy du jour is that James Holmes’ attack on a packed audience watching a midnight screening of The Dark Knight Rises was in actuality an atrocity planned in advance by elements within the federal government and/or the United Nations. Those advocating this claim are pointing to several shaky bits of “evidence” that are in actuality nothing of the sort. This isn’t surprising, though: it costs practically nothing to make baseless accusations under the guise of “just asking questions”, and there’s much to be gained by doing so in terms of attention and notoriety. (Just ask Glenn Beck.)