Tag Archives | Australia

Australia PM’s Adviser: Climate Change is UN Hoax to Create New World Order

Prime Minister Tony Abbott.jpg

Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott

Maurice Newman is going to get kicked out of Canberra before you can say “G’day” if he carries on exposing UN conspiracies to create the New World Order. His op-ed piece in the Australian [paywall] has gone viral, picked up here by the Guardian:

The Australian prime minister’schief business adviser has accused the United Nations of using debunked climate change science to lead a new world order – provocative claims made to coincide with a visit from the top UN climate negotiator.

Christiana Figueres, who heads the UN framework convention on climate change, touring Australia this week, urged the country to move away from heavily polluting coal production.

Under Tony Abbott’s leadership, Australia has been reluctant to engage in global climate change politics, unsuccessfully attempting to keep the issue off the agenda of the G20 leaders’ summit in Brisbane last year.

Maurice Newman, the chairman of Abbott’s business advisory council and a climate change sceptic with a history of making provocative statements, said the UN was using false models showing sustained temperature increases to end democracy and impose authoritarian rule.

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The past is not sacred: the ‘history wars’ over Anzac

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Marilyn Lake and Henry Reynolds’ What’s Wrong With Anzac? NewSouth

Peter Cochrane, University of Sydney

The Gallipoli centenary provides a unique opportunity to reflect on the many wartime legacies – human, political, economic, military – that forged independent nations from former colonies and dominions. The Conversation, in partnership with Griffith Review, has published a series of essays exploring the enduring legacies of 20th-century wars.


The term “history wars” is best known in Australia for summing up the fierce debate over the nature and extent of frontier conflict, with profound implications for the legitimacy of the British settlement and thus for national legitimacy today.

That debate, though hardly resolved, is now taking something of a back seat to a public controversy focused on Australia’s wars of the 20th century and particularly on the war of 1914–18, called the Great War until the Second World War redefined it as the First.… Read the rest

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Iconic boab trees trace journeys of ancient Aboriginal people

Legend tells that huge hollow boabs were used as prisons in north west Australia. Robyn Jay/Flickr, CC BY-SA

Legend tells that huge hollow boabs were used as prisons in north west Australia. Robyn Jay/Flickr, CC BY-SA

Haripriya Rangan, Monash University

Baobabs, the iconic bottle trees of Africa and Madagascar, have a single relative, the boab, living in the Kimberley region of northwest Australia. No one knows when and how the boab came across from Africa to Australia, or why its natural range is limited to this region.

In a study published recently in PLOS ONE, we solve one part of this mystery by showing that ancient Aboriginal peoples were responsible for spreading the boab in the Kimberley.

The boab mystery

An early hypothesis was that baobabs existed in parts of the supercontinent of Gondwana, which split up and became Africa, Madagascar and Australia more than 50 million years ago. This was not very convincing because, for one thing, peninsular India was part of that massive continental break-up, but does not have any of its own baobab species.… Read the rest

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Python Cereal: Man Finds 6ft Python In Box of Cornflakes

python-snake-cereal-2

On Tuesday in Australia (no surprises there), 22-year-old Jarred Smith found a Diamond python hiding in his open box of cornflakes.

Smith was making lunch when he happened to notice a 2m (roughly 6.5ft) long python hanging out in his cereal box. Understandably, Smith panicked, dropped his food, and ran from the kitchen. Smith’s father was also home and they called the New South Wales Wildlife Information, Rescue and Education Service.

According to The Independent, Chris McGreal, an employee of the Wildlife Rescue Service told the Daily Telegraph:

“The python was over 2m long and I couldn’t believe it was jammed into this small cereal box.

“When I got there I actually had to tear the box to get it out, that’s how tightly squeezed in it was. It’s likely it was hiding in there to feel secure.”

McGreal released the python back into the bushland, where I suspect it will begin plotting to hijack someone’s Lucky Charms box.… Read the rest

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The British-American coup that ended Australian independence

Prime minister Gough Whitlam watches ACTU president Bob Hawke drink beer from a yard glass Melbourne, Australia, 1972. Photograph: News Ltd/Newspix/REX

Prime minister Gough Whitlam watches ACTU president Bob Hawke drink beer from a yard glass Melbourne, Australia, 1972. Photograph: News Ltd/Newspix/REX

via The Guardian:

Across the media and political establishment in Australia, a silence has descended on the memory of the great, reforming prime minister Gough Whitlam. His achievements are recognised, if grudgingly, his mistakes noted in false sorrow. But a critical reason for his extraordinary political demise will, they hope, be buried with him.

Australia briefly became an independent state during the Whitlam years, 1972-75. An American commentator wrote that no country had “reversed its posture in international affairs so totally without going through a domestic revolution”. Whitlam ended his nation’s colonial servility. He abolished royal patronage, moved Australia towards the Non-Aligned Movement, supported “zones of peace” and opposed nuclear weapons testing.

Although not regarded as on the left of the Labor party, Whitlam was a maverick social democrat of principle, pride and propriety.

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Islamic State wants Australians to attack Muslims: terror expert

 

Police outside one of the Sydney homes raided earlier today, which has prompted warnings against an anti-Muslim backlash. AAP Image/Dean Lewins

Police outside one of the Sydney homes raided earlier today, which has prompted warnings against an anti-Muslim backlash. AAP Image/Dean Lewins

This article was originally published on The Conversation.
Read the original article.

By Nick O’Brien
Former head of International Counter Terrorism in Special Branch at New Scotland Yard; Associate Professor Counter Terrorism at Charles Sturt University

It’s in the interests of Islamic State for Muslims in Australia to be attacked or for their mosques to be attacked, because doing so would help divide the Australian community. But we should be very clear: the only people who win if Australia is divided are the extremists.

The new allegations of a plot to kidnap and behead Australians as a way of supporting the Islamic State didn’t surprise me, because there was a similar plot in the UK about seven years ago. In that UK case, it was a plot to kidnap, torture and behead a British Muslim soldier, film it, and put it on the internet.… Read the rest

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Bizarre ISIS Plot To Behead Random Australian Foiled

Australian Federal Police with Ian Thorpe.jpg

Australian Federal Police with Ian Thorpe by Graeme Bartlett (CC)

Is this story too strange to be true? Or just strange enough? ABC Australia reports that ISIS planned to grab a random person from a crowd in  Sydney, Australia, and behead them:

Police say a large-scale anti-terrorism raid in Sydney this morning has foiled a plot to “commit violent acts” in Australia, including a plan to behead a member of the public.

More than 800 officers launched the raids as part of Operation Appleby in suburbs across Sydney’s west and north-west, with a further 70 police involved in raids on properties in Brisbane’s south.

Police said 15 people had been detained in Sydney as part of the operation between NSW officers, the Australian Federal Police and ASIO.

Court documents are expected to reveal that the raids, at 25 different properties, were aimed at a cell which planned to behead a member of the public in Sydney.

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Are We Doing Enough to Learn the Truth about UFOs?

The moment of so called "explosion" of the unknown craft in Rendlesham forest area. Software used: Google SketchUp, Kerkythea, TwistedBrush, Photoscape (CC) wikimedia

The moment of so called “explosion” of the unknown craft in Rendlesham forest area. Software used: Google SketchUp, Kerkythea, TwistedBrush, Photoscape (CC) wikimedia

Well are we? Would you join a civilian unit to quickly investigate UFO sightings?

via UFO Casebook

A LEADING Australian researcher has called for the launch of a quick response team to investigate UFO sightings across Australia within hours of them being reported. The civilian unit would take on a role similar to air crash investigators, interviewing witnesses and taking samples from the scene to be tested, with findings documented and released publicly.

The concept was among a raft of proposals tabled by experts at a Victorian UFO action conference.Researcher Keith Basterfield also called for a three-day symposium to help explain one of Melbourne’s most baffling cases.

The 1966 sighting over Westall High School in Clayton South could be solved by bringing together witnesses and experts under the one roof, he said.

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It’s personal: why leaders don’t turn climate knowledge into action

By Nicola Jones via Flickr

By Nicola Jones via Flickr

This article was originally published on The Conversation.
Read the original article.

By Simon Divecha

There is an abundance of profitable business opportunity to be found in addressing sustainability issues. These stand out against the difficulties we face implementing effective change. Globally, the World Bank recently found that tackling climate change would help to grow the world’s economy by US$1.8 to 2.6 trillion a year.

Private sector investors argue for action as well. One prominent example is the Carbon Disclosure Project which represents 767 institutional investors holding US$92 trillion in assets worldwide. Its programs reward and promote companies acting on climate change.

There is detailed analysis, alongside successfully implemented examples, across nearly every industry sector showing an 80% reduction in environmental impact for each dollar of economic output. This is not, necessarily, even a case of implementing new technology. Planning and design help to deliver similar outcomes – for example, in residential developments.… Read the rest

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Spiders Grow Bigger and Multiply Faster in Urban Areas

"The largest and smallest spiders collected for the study (5 millimeters is about the length of an adult ladybug, which an orb weaver would probably eat)."  Elizabeth Lowe/University of Sydney

“The largest and smallest spiders collected for the study (5 millimeters is about the length of an adult ladybug, which an orb weaver would probably eat).” Elizabeth Lowe/University of Sydney

As much as I hate spiders, I don’t hate them as much as some of the other creepy crawlies. I will let them live as long as they don’t bother me.

via Wired:

Something about city life appears to be causing spiders to grow larger than their rural counterparts. And if that’s not enough to give you nightmares, these bigger urban spiders are also multiplying faster.

new study published today in PLOS One shows that golden orb weaver spiders living near heavily urbanized areas in Sydney, Australia tend to be bigger, better fed, and have more babies than those living in places less touched by human hands.

The study’s authors collected 222 of the creatures from parks and bushland throughout Sydney, and correlated their sizes to features of the built and natural landscape.

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