Tag Archives | Ayahuasca

Preparing for Ayahuasca

VisAyaBefore taking an ayahuasca trip how can I prepare?

Go and see Avatar again in 3-D.

Millions of us saw Avatar and, in journeying on Pandora, we discovered a world that is not so distant from the aboriginal’s world: interconnections among plants, animals, the tree of souls, and so forth.

We rode the dragon, which is close to the archetypal visions offered by the plants. With no difficulty, we also entered into fully experiencing the emotions of the movie character who was asleep in his pod while his adventure was being lived by his avatar. This is just like the experience in a ceremony, where you are seated in the maloca but your mind can be on a distant voyage. What’s more, with Avatar you’re experiencing this adventure in 3-D, projected with depth, within a sensory immersion that is continually all around you in a way that’s similar to the visions in a ceremony!… Read the rest

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Ayahuasca Can Help You Communicate with Plant Spirits, and Heal Your Body and Mind

Medicine Hunter Chris Kilham with Goji Berry in China.jpg

Chris Kilham (CC)

If you needed any further persuasion that psychedelic drugs are back in vogue, this hearty endorsement by Newsweek of the foul but powerful brew known as Ayahuasca should do the trick:

Drink ayahuasca and you may see yourself being eaten by a crocodile. You may find a miraculous resolution to a crippling sadness. Or, more likely, you’ll land somewhere in between. Regardless, you will definitely throw up. Author and ethnobotanist Chris Kilham says all of these things have happened to him after drinking this psychoactive Amazonian brew.

If you haven’t heard of ayahuasca, you may soon. While once consumed mainly by natives of the Amazon basin, today, thousands visit Latin American countries every year to imbibe it, with the hopes of seeing profound visions, having religious experiences and—many claim—undergoing immense healing. Ayahuasca now has devoted followers throughout the world.

Kilham, who calls himself the “medicine hunter” and has traveled to and intermittently lived in the Amazon for more than two decades, says that he is a firm believer in the healing properties of the drink, which is made from the bark of a jungle vine called Banisteriopsis Caapi, and usually mixed with other plants like the leaves of the Justicia pectoralis or Psychotria viridis.

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The Sacred Valley: A Prototype for Psychedelic Society

Urubamba Valley, Sacred Valley of the Incas, Peru. Photo: Charles Gadbois via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 3.0)

Urubamba Valley, Sacred Valley of the Incas, Peru.
Photo: Charles Gadbois via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 3.0)

The dream of a free society where psychedelic exploration is not prohibited is coming true. Acknowledgment of the medicinal and spiritual benefits of such activity is steadily breaking through to the mainstream. It’s hard to say when this transformation will be complete but that we are headed in that direction is increasingly obvious. Those of us with direct experience of intentional psychedelic therapy have seen that the personal effects that can arise will range from the subtle to the dramatic. Gentle bursts of creativity as well as total emancipation from addiction are not at all uncommon. How these personal breakthroughs will translate into a more generalized social shift is being slowly revealed. The transformation is of course more evident in some areas than in others.

One of the more pronounced examples of this trend exists just outside of the historic city of Cusco, Peru, where a community of international seekers have settled in the area known as the Sacred Valley of the Incas.… Read the rest

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Common Themes in South American Indian Yage Experiences

Paul Hessell (CC BY 2.0)

Paul Hessell (CC BY 2.0)

Deoxy.org (via web.archive):

The existence of a hallucinatory drink made from the South American tropical forest ayahuasca or yage vine (Banisteriopsis) was perhaps first reported to the Western world by the Ecuadorian geographer, Villavicencio. He observed (1858: 372-73):

This beverage is narcotic, as one might suppose, and in a few moments it begins to produce the most rare phenomena. Its action appears to excite the nervous system; all the senses liven up and all faculties awaken; they feel vertigo and spinning in the head, then a sensation of being lifted into the air and beginning an aerial journey; the possessed begins in the first moments to see the most delicious apparitions, in conformity with his ideas and knowledge: the savages (apparently the Zaparo of eastern Ecuador) say that they see gorgeous lakes, forests covered with fruit, the prettiest birds who communicate to them the nicest and the most favorable things they want to hear, and other beautiful things relating to their savage life.

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The Beautiful Darkness of Ayahuasca

J. Davis Rorer (CC by 2.0)

J. Davis Rorer (CC by 2.0)

Last week, I ingested ayahuasca. For those who are not familiar with ayahuasca: it is a potent psychedelic/entheogen derived from a particular set of South American plants. This is my account of the experience.

Usually, the brew is prepared as a medicinal tea and is ingested in a ritualistic fashion under the (hopefully competent) guidance of a shaman or an ayahuasquero. The name ayahuasca, which roughly translates to “vine of the soul” or “vine of death,” is often consumed as a spiritual purgative, a kind of curative solution for psycho-physical maladies. It is a somewhat ancient concoction and has been considered one of the strongest hallucinogens known to man, mostly due to its extremely potent effects on the psyche as well as the spiritual depth that it evokes in those who experience it. Its potency has everything to do with its active ingredient, DMT, an organic compound natural to most living beings, which is said to play an important role in dreaming.… Read the rest

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The Ayahuasca Dialogues

If you’re concerned about the future of psychedelic medicines and ethical/sustainable sources, then please support this project by the Ethnobotanical Stewardship Council. They are making big strides and can use all our help.

From The Nexian:

With the continued rise in popularity of psychedelic plant medicines, concerns surrounding sustainable harvesting methods and safe administration by practitioners are growing. The Ethnobotanical Stewardship Council is a nonprofit organization dedicated to ensuring the sustainable and safe use of traditional plants and enriching the communities who work with them.

As we have seen in recent articles, unsustainable harvesting is a growing issue with ayahuasca, mimosa and acacia trees, iboga, peyote, and even sassafras in SE Asia. Quite antithetical to the earth-centered teachings of these plants, these harvesting methods have a devastating impact on the environment.

In order to truly heal with the planet we must not only have these experiences of higher awareness of the biosphere, but put our thoughts into action and become the stewards of nature, not its disease.… Read the rest

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The Drunken Taoist Podcast BONUS Episode 2 – Duncan Trussell Joins Us in Honor of Geoff Moxham

“Fuck pain. Fuck heartbreak. I’m still in love with life.”
– Daniele Bolleli

Danielle_Bolleli_Bruce_Lee_Mashup

Intro:

Our listener Chimmy Moxham decided to sponsor a bonus episode in memory of his father Geoff. This is a non-commercial sponsorship since there’s absolutely nothing to sell. If you’d like to check out Geoff’s website purely for knowledge’s sake, here you go.

  • A podcast made with blood
    Being too safe is going to kill you
    Duncan and his ayahuasca trip
    Duncan may return from his trip as Priscilla Trussell
    Fun: tennis with an alien praying mantis
    Playing tag with machetes
    Amber Lyon is my new favorite mood-altering drug
    Rich’s father death journey
    Duncan and the pre-stage butterflies
    Michael Jordan, Robin Williams, Joe Rogan and being cool to your audience
    Despising one’s students: a teacher’s ultimate sin

Download the podcast here

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Ayahuasca: A Strong Cup of Tea

Peruvian Ayahuasca, Photo by Sascha GrabowThe New York Times SundayStyles section’s lead cover story this weekend is about Bushwick hipsters experimenting with Ayahuasca, along with a photo collage of celebrities who have tried it, including Lindsay Lohan, Tori Amos, Penn Badgley, Devendra Banhart and Sting. What does mainstream media recognition mean for the future of the foul-tasting brew?

On a recent Friday night, a dozen seekers in loosefitting attire, most in their 20s and 30s, climbed a flight of steps of a mixed-used community space in Bushwick, Brooklyn. After arranging yoga mats and blankets on the floor, they each paid $150, listened to a Colombian shaman and his assistant welcome them in Spanish and English, signed a disclaimer, and accepted large plastic takeout-style containers for vomiting.

Then, one at a time, each got up to receive a cup of thick brownish liquid with a muddy herbal taste. It was ayahuasca (eye-uh-WAH-skuh) tea, a hallucinogenic brew from the Amazon that they hoped would open them to personal insights through optic and auditory hallucinations.

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The Ayahuasca Sessions: Elias Mamallacta

elias

Elias Mamallacta

[disinfo ed.’s note: the following is an excerpt from The Ayahuasca Sessions: Conversations with Amazonian Curanderos and Western Shamans by Rak Razam] 

An Interview with Elias Mamallacta

Elias is the son of a well-known Ecuadorian family of curanderos, the Mamallactas. Ecuadorian shamanism stresses the spirituality of the ayahuasca medicine and Elias especially chastises those who treat it as a business. Here he talks about the nature of ayahuasca, spiritual tourism, and the need to preserve indigenous knowledge and cultures and protect them from oil companies and inappropriate development. Translation by Richard Grossman.

RAK: Thank you for chatting with us, Elias. I guess I’m interested in the Ecuadorian perspective on your lineage, how you came to be a curandero, and what shamanism’s like in Ecuador.

ELIAS: In Ecuador curanderismo is very sacred, and we don’t sell it, because it’s of the mother. You have to utilize what our mother, ayahuasca, says.… Read the rest

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