BBC



Perhaps reflecting the zeitgeist, the BBC has been searching for a song to broadcast should the end of the world, or apocalypse, be upon us: Earlier this month we covered the revelation that Ted Turner,…


Continuing our string of spooky October posts, this month we celebrate the birthday of filmmaker Ed Wood who was born on October 10, 1924. Wood passed away prematurely at the age of 54…


Here in America, there’s whole political ideologies consisting of crackpots and media pundits whose bread and butter is wingnuttery. via Slate In very welcome news, BBC journalists have been told to stop…





The Kernel recalls a particularly strange episode in British broadcasting history: An evening when an “alien” named “Vrillon” took over the airwaves: Via The Kernel: As Andrew Gardner read out news of…


In the wake of the NSA/Snowden revelations, and the general sense of paranoia that has taken grip of the news cycle and the internet, a few pundits have assumed the roles of…


The walking, talking antithesis of mainstream news programming, or the perfect addition to it? Following a dramatic appearance on CNN earlier this year, this past weekend Alex Jones was featured on the BBC One’s Sunday Politics show for the ostensible purpose of discussing the Bilderberg Conference. Perhaps not completely surprisingly, things took a turn towards the chaotic, with the show fading out with Jones shouting at viewers to “wake up” as host Andrew Neil makes “looney tunes” gestures at the camera:












Spaghetti HarvestGood to discover that the BBC has a much better sense of humor than American news networks, even in 1957. Via Wikipedia:

The spaghetti tree hoax is a famous 3-minute hoax report broadcast on April Fools’ Day 1957 by the BBC current affairs program Panorama. It told a tale of a family in southern Switzerland harvesting spaghetti from the fictitious spaghetti tree, broadcast at a time when this Italian dish was not widely eaten in the UK and some Britons were unaware spaghetti is a pasta made from wheat flour and water.

Hundreds of viewers phoned into the BBC, either to say the story was not true, or wondering about it, with some even asking how to grow their own spaghetti trees. Decades later CNN called this broadcast “the biggest hoax that any reputable news establishment ever pulled.”