Big Brother






In this report, Russia Today covers the judicial review of the National Security Agency, the number of open-records request to the NSA in light of the leaks from Edward Snowden, and even…







After Rand Paul’s filibuster this last week, many people are paying a bit more attention to the idea that our government may not always be using their cool toys for our own good. RT’s Abby Martin reported on mini drones and the possible ways in which they could be used against the public.

One has to wonder if these little dandies might slip through the cracks of public awareness due to their size. Will Rand Paul get up again and passionately rail against the use of these cute lil’ fellas? Presently in military use abroad, it seems like only a matter of time before these mini-drones hit the ghettos and suburbs of America to quietly keep an eye on the malcontents. If you can imagine it, it’s probably going to be done at some point. Easy as ‘playing an Xbox’; mini drones offer a new way for those in power to keep an eye on you…through your second floor bedroom window. Nice undies!








William Binney, a former award-winning mathematician and code-breaker at the National Security Agency, talks to Russia Today regarding the virtual surveillance of the entire public:

The FBI has access to the data collected, which is basically the emails of virtually everybody in the country. All the congressional members are on the surveillance too, no one is excluded. If they become a target for whatever reason – the government can go in, the FBI, or other agencies, pull all that data collected on them over the years, and we analyze it all. So, we have to actively analyze everything they’ve done for the last 10 years at least.

That’s why they’re building Bluffdale [database facility], because they have to have more storage, because they can’t figure out what’s important, so they are just storing everything there. So, emails are going to be stored there in the future, but right now stored in different places around the country.



Via popsci.com:

Customers buying Kit-Kat bars in the United Kingdom could be unwrapping a 21st-century version of Willy Wonka’s Golden Ticket–a GPS unit the candy-maker will use to find them, apprehend them and give them a prize. Nestlé claims to be the first to market its chocolatey wares with a GPS-based promotion. The somewhat sinister-sounding “We Will Find You” campaign will place a GPS-enabled bar inside four versions of Kit-Kats. Inside the wrapper, it would look exactly like a regular Kit-Kat, according to the York Press newspaper, in the town where Nestlé is based. When the would-be snacker pulls a tab to open the wrapper, the GPS device will turn on, which will notify the company. Then a “prize team” will locate this person within 24 hours and hand him or her a check for £10,000 (about $16,000).