Tag Archives | Bizarre

Today’s Blue Light Special: 10 Pounds of Weed

A fantastic headline courtesy of SPD Blotter:

Police seized a big package of pot earlier this week after the weed took a wrong turn on a cross-country trip and landed in the stock room at a north Seattle Kmart.

Just after noon on January 28th, Kmart employees called police to their store at 132nd and Aurora Avenue N. after a package—filled with 10 pounds of weed wrapped in garbage bags, packing peanuts, and cleaning-fluid-soaked pages from a Korean newspaper (?!?)—arrived at the store.

Delivery information on the package indicates it was originally shipped via UPS from Los Angeles to a Philadelphia address, but never made it to its intended destination in Philly.

Whoever sent the package listed the address of the Seattle Kmart on the return label…

[continues at SPD Blotter]

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Weird Science (Part 2)

Sarfatti, left, with Fred Alan Wolf in Paris, 1973 (CC)

[continues from Part 1]

Into the Pandemonium

In 1975, Sarfatti co-founded the legendary Physics-Consciousness Research Group with Esalen Institute’s Michael Murphy, funded by EST guru Werner Erhard. Murphy was investigating revelations of the USSR’s intensive parapsychological research projects, later setting up the Soviet-American Exchange Program at Esalen in the 1980s, which attracted the likes of Boris Yeltsin during his 1989 U.S. visit.

Sarfatti gave seminars at Esalen, serving as a guiding influence behind Fritjoff Capra, Gary Zukav and other proponents of the 1970s “New Physics” movement, which explored links between quantum physics and Eastern mysticism. Sarfatti brought Zukav to the Esalen Institute, where he conducted the research for his bestselling The Dancing Wu Li Masters (New York: Morrow, 1979), a book which captured worldwide attention. Sarfatti ghost-wrote major parts of the book, but a bitter feud eventuated when Zukav reneged on promised royalty payments.… Read the rest

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Weird Science

Jack Sarfatti (CC)

[disinfo ed.'s note: this original essay was first published by disinformation on January 28, 2001. Some links may have changed.]

Author’s note: This interview was originally published in 21.C magazine (4/1996, The Unafesto): 54-59. It was my entre to a covert and mysterious world.

Dr. Jack Sarfatti is one of the leaders of the New Physics movement. However, his research into E.S.P., time, future causality and his VALIS-type experience has provoked dissent in the mainstream physics community.

The Bohemian physicist . . . contributes a balanced scientific non-establishment for this expanding society. I don’t mean to disparage the work, either . . . Originality has always required a fertile expanse of fumble and mistake . . . Your wastrel life might turn out to be just what’s required to save the planet.
~ ~Herbert Gold, Bohemia: Where Art, Angst, Love and Strong Coffee Meet

Black holes, Alcubierre warp drives, traversable worm holes, and the quest for the Holy Grail of dark matter are outpacing the wildest SF fantasies in the public’s imagination.… Read the rest

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Creepy Medical Cannibalism In Europe’s Past

Res Obscura on a part of medical history which is not secret, yet never discussed, most likely because it is so gruesome:

What did the jars [in seventeenth and eighteenth century pharmacies] actually contain? Things found in herb teas sold today, like chamomile, fennel, licorice, and cardamom — alongside some utterly bizarre ones, like powdered crab’s eyes, Egyptian mummies, and human skull, or “cranium humanum.” I was struck by the degree to which they take for granted the consumption of human bodies as medicinal drugs.

Substances like human fat or powdered mummy were once so common that hundreds or perhaps even thousands of antique ceramic jars purpose-built to contain them still exist in antique shops, museums and private collections. This is no secret, but it remains more or less the domain of specialists in early modern history.

It was a relatively common sight in early modern France and Germany to witness relatives of sick people collecting blood from recently executed criminals to use in medical preparations:

For those who preferred their blood cooked, a 1679 recipe from a Franciscan apothecary describes how to make it into marmalade…[T]hese medicines may have been incidentally helpful—even though they worked by magical thinking, one more clumsy search for answers to the question of how to treat ailments at a time when even the circulation of blood was not yet understood.

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‘Mundus Subterraneus’: Arcane, Uncanny, Online

Until recently, if you wanted to leaf through Athanasius Kircher’s Mundus Subterraneus, you had to sneak into a university’s rare book collection at night, Wilbur Whateley-style.  Now the complete work, with its many bizarre and fantastic illustrations, is available at the Internet Archive—enjoy. John Glassie has an excellent piece on it at The Public Domain Review:

Just before Robert Hooke’s rightly famous microscopic observations of everything from the “Edges of Rasors” to “Vine mites” appeared in Micrographia in 1665, the insatiably curious and incredibly prolific Jesuit scholar Athanasius Kircher published what is in many ways a more spectacular work. Mundus Subterraneus (Underground World), a two-volume tome of atlas-like dimensions, was intended to lay out “before the eyes of the curious reader all that is rare, exotic, and portentous contained in the fecund womb of Nature.” There is an “idea of the earthly sphere that exists in the divine mind,” Kircher proclaimed, and in this book, one of more than thirty on almost as many subjects that he published during his lifetime, he tried to prove that he had grasped it.

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1,000-Year-Old Mass Grave Of Elongated Skulls Found In Mexico

The remains of “lucky,” high-power individuals who had their heads ritually elongated have previously been unearthed across the globe in South America, Germany, and Greece. Was the goal to mimic the look of alien overlords? Via Yahoo! News UK:

An archaeological dig near the village of Onavas, south of Sonora in Mexico has uncovered strange elongated skulls from more than a millenia ago. The burial site contained 25 individuals, 13 with elongated skulls – reminiscent of the monster from Ridley Scott’s Alien.

The ‘cranial deformation’ in the skulls is actually intentional – carried out by binding the heads of babies to produce the bizarre effect. For pre-Hispanic cultures in the area, longer skulls were a sign of social status.

‘Cranial deformation in Mesoamerican cultures was used to differentiate one social group from another and for ritual purposes,’ said Cristina Garcia Moreno, the head of the research project. South American cultures such as the Maya and Inca practiced cranial deformation – and the practice was also known in Germany and Ancient Greece.

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I Was A CIA Sex Slave

In this classic clip from DisinfoTV on DVD we meet Brice Taylor, a housewife from Woodland Hills, California who discovered she was leading a terrifying double life. Incredibly, she reveals her participation in a CIA mind control operation, dubbed Project Monarch, involving celebrities, gruesome Satanic rituals, and forced prostitution. Subscribe to Disinformation's YouTube channel: http://goo.gl/aHTcz
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South Korea’s Toilet Culture Park

Toilet in german theater munichWe all know people who never outgrew toilet humor, but in the South Korean town of Suwon there are apparently enough people obsessed with all things to do with bodily excretion that there is an entire park devoted to the topic, graphically. The Daily Mail has lots of photos in this report (video from IB Times):

…From the bronze statues of people sitting on the toilet dotted around outside, to the converted toilet-shaped house which contains an exhibition on toilets through the ages, everything here is themed after one thing.

There is even a room devoted to toilet-related art – fitting in a city which holds the annual Golden Poop art festival. It might not seem like the most attractive tourist destination, but Lee Youn-Souk, who works at the park, thinks differently.

She told the BBC: ‘We just focus on eating everyday, we sometimes overlook the importance of the toilet.

‘We already know upon waking up in the morning we should go to the toilet but people don’t want to talk about this. So we wanted to demonstrate to the public out ‘toilet culture’.

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