Tag Archives | Black Friday

Occupy-Themed Best Buy Marketing Campaign

Have you been curious how the Occupy movement would be co-opted? Occupy Best Buy combines the red-hot protest movement with Black Power fist iconography in an effort to get people pumped up about buying plasma screen TVs or whatever it is they sell at Best Buy. Definitely the worst of the occupations to spring up so far. Best Buy claims that no affiliation with the web site, though one would suspect that it’s a viral marketing effort:

occupy

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24/7 Consumerism Is Killing Us

Image Courtesy of Colorado Indymedia

Image Courtesy of Colorado Indymedia

While it’s certainly an interesting and laudable idea — trying to reclaim time and head space back from the hyper-capitalist/consumerist society — do we need to use a piece of religious dogma to do it? What’s the difference between doing what we can as a society to free ourselves from corporate mind control and creating laws that would prevent someone from picking up something as simple as a gallon of milk on a certain day?

Denise Civiletti writes at the Riverhead Local:

County Executive Steve Levy wants to force stores to shut down between noon and 5 p.m. on Thanksgiving Day and has proposed a law forcing them to close or face penalties of up to $1,500. (See story.)

I think he’s right.

There are no days off any more, and it’s making us sick as a society. I don’t mean physically ill (though there’s likely a connection there, too); I’m talking about every other kind of wellness: spiritual, emotional and — yes — even moral health and well-being.

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Tightwads and Spendthrifts: A Black Friday Tradition

Black Friday at a Walmart

Black Friday shoppers at Walmart. Photo: Dustin (CC)

From ScienceDaily:

Every year about this time, on Black Friday, the day after Thanksgiving that traditionally begins the holiday shopping season, early-morning consumers stand in long lines eager to purchase some sought after prize. From the outside, it looks as if these holiday shoppers can’t wait to plunk down their cash, but University of Michigan Marketing Professor Scott Rick says consumers often behave differently than they would ideally like to behave.

“Some consumers chronically spend more than they would like, and some consumers chronically spend less than they would like,” he says. Where an individual falls within the range of desiring to spend more or less largely determines whether he or she is a tightwad or a spendthrift, characteristics that determine quite a bit about a person’s spending habits.

Rick says anticipating the psychological pain that goes along with paying money drives some people to spend less than they would like, while not experiencing enough pain causes others to spend more.

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