Book Publishing

Personally I like to go back to my books and find the text still there, but apparently books whose text disappears in two months are a hit. Louise Goddard reports for The Verge:

Ad agency Draftcb has won gold at the Cannes PR Lions for an innovative publishing concept, using disappearing ink to print books that gradually fade away over the course of two months. Dubbed “The Book That Can’t Wait,” the format — an intriguing one in a world increasingly dominated by Kindles and Nooks — is being pioneered by independent Argentinian publishing house Eterna Cadencia, which is using it to promote new authors. As the promo video (below) points out, “if people don’t read their first books, they’ll never make it to a second.”

The specially-developed ink used in the books works via a chemical process, starting to disappear…

The book publishing world was thoroughly excited at the prospect of the Pentagon buying up entire print runs of books they wanted to suppress when it was revealed that Anthony Shaffer’s book…

Thanks to Isaac Hils for this. As publishers, this story definitely appeals to us at disinformation: Authors with books the Pentagon wants to stop, take note! From the Guardian:

It’s every author’s dream – to write a book that’s so sensationally popular it’s impossible to find a copy in the shops, even as it keeps climbing up the bestseller lists.

And so it is for Anthony Shaffer, thanks to the Pentagon’s desire to buy up all 10,000 copies of the first printing of his new book, Operation Dark Heart: Spycraft and Special Ops on the Frontlines of Afghanistan — and The Path to Victory. And then pulp them.

The US defence department is scrambling to dispose of what threatens to be a highly embarrassing expose by the former intelligence officer of secret operations in Afghanistan and Pakistan, and of how the US military top brass missed the opportunity to win the war against the Taliban.

The department of defence is in talks with St Martin’s Press to purchase the entire first print run on the grounds of national security…

Dan who? James Patterson is king when it comes to making money from writing books (although I’m not sure he actually writes that much himself — a New York Times Magazine profile earlier this year says “with the help of his stable of co-authors, he published nine original hardcover books in 2009 and will publish at least nine more in 2010,” implying that most of the work is done by the co-authors). From Forbes:

Publishers are feeling the heat, with hardcover sales weak and the rise of e-books promising to upend their business models. But the world’s 10 top-earning authors are making out just fine, earning a combined $270 million over the 12 months to June 1.

James Patterson’s $70 million in earnings vaults him to No. 1 on our list, up from second place two years ago. The prolific thriller writer’s latest deal, signed last fall, involves penning a carpal tunnel-risking 17 books by the end of 2012 for an estimated $100 million.

Patterson’s literary empire includes television, comic book and gaming deals. His foreign sales alone bring in well over $10 million a year…

A book editor at Houghton Mifflin argues ebook advertising is “coming soon to a book near you.” Report in the Wall Street Journal: Amazon has filed a patent for advertisements on the…

Rhonda Byrne’s The Secret, originally released as a film, became a book publishing phenomenon in 2006, with 19 million copies printed in 46 languages, not to mention disinformation‘s own Beyond The Secret, in which Alexandra Bruce dissected the teachings of Byrne and her fellow “life coaches” that comprised the so-called “Secret.”

For reasons unknown (to us and the rest of the general public, anyway), Rhonda won’t be promoting the sequel, The Power. Could it be that she really can’t think of a way to tell interviewers what’s different in this book from the fluff in the previous one? Her publishers have resorted to advertising on TV with the promo below — it goes on sale at midnight tonight…

When photographed by your web cam, a book’s image appears to update in a real-time, as rotating its cover toggles between the company’s feeds on Flickr, Twitter, Vimeo, and their blog. (Tilting and left-right motions provide scrolling.)

The trick is performed using embedded Flash content. and it’s an example of both “fluid interfaces” and augmented reality. (This article provides video of the cover in action, along with other examples of augmented reality…)

Augmented Reality. from Moving Brands on Vimeo.